Synthetic Oil ??

Messages
9
Location
Toronto
Stupid question # 2. I'm presently using Castrol 20 W 50 GTX " Dino " oil. If I switch to 20 W 50 Amsoil,will I get better lubrication,Lower wear,and Lower oil pressure ?? Would lower oil pressure really matter,if you're using good synthetic ? Thanks.
 
Messages
25,045
Location
ON, Canada eh?
In my opinion yes you would... Pressure does not equal better lubrication, it's flow that does and generally lower pressure equates to better flow in most circumstances because there is less restriction. They are both really great oils, but you being in the Winter belt like me, you are better off with Amsoil IMO.
 
Messages
6,318
Location
Canton, GA
 Originally Posted By: StevieC
I use 10w30 in my Austin Mini, why do British cars need thicker oil? It doesn't burn or leak any. (Yet!)
"STEVIE-C" their tolerances are not as tight.Thats one reason,and probably more.
 
Messages
25,045
Location
ON, Canada eh?
I know why you said it... I was bugging you. I do use 10w30 for now. When I notice smoke or consumption/leak issues I will thicken it up. I'm just happy the British stuck to cars and not rockets or Nuclear missles or we might have seen quite a different world!
 
Messages
4,622
Location
Western Washington
 Originally Posted By: sierra
Stupid question # 2. I'm presently using Castrol 20 W 50 GTX " Dino " oil. If I switch to 20 W 50 Amsoil,will I get better lubrication,Lower wear,and Lower oil pressure ?? Would lower oil pressure really matter,if you're using good synthetic ? Thanks.
No, you won't get better lubrication. Synthetic oil does not lubricate better than dino oil. No, you won't get lower wear. Oil pressure should not change. The main advantages of syn over dino are better cold starting characteristics, less sludging on prone engines and longer OCIs.
 
Messages
6,388
Location
Washington St.
 Originally Posted By: StevieC
Pressure does not equal better lubrication, it's flow that does and generally lower pressure equates to better flow in most circumstances because there is less restriction.
Not so at all. Better lubrication is the result of ample quantities of better oil at the right temperature in the right places at the right time. Flow just (a) gets the oil into places the oil flows out of, and (b) carries away heat and debris. Lower pressure does not at all equate to better flow if that lower pressure is from either lower pump output, a restriction along the way, or more leakage from the bearing. Have you been reading the ramblings of that cosmetic plastic surgeon, Dr. Haas? See Dr. Haas for a nose job. Consult with a tribologist or certain engineers for lubrication information.
 
Messages
4,009
Location
Calgary Canada
Synthetic oil is not a better lubricant than dino oil except in these circumstances (generally speaking): - overheating; - long OCI's; - very cold temperatures. Check the UOA section if you don't believe me.
 
Messages
47,536
Location
Duvall WA - Pacific NW USA
Well actually you can't use UOA's to judge "wear", and if you do - you will see metal amounts in PPM over miles is less with synthetic when you get beyond 3-4-5K, under 3K about the same. You also forgot that synthetic oil excels in turbo applications and in cases where a higher viscosity is wanted at operating temps without sacrificing low temperature flow.
 
Messages
1,648
Location
Little Rock, AR
 Originally Posted By: sierra
Stupid question # 2.
Sierra, that was actually your third stupid question. But who's keeping count. :) But seriously, I think it would be so cool to drop Amsoil 20w50 into the proper app. That's gotta be some Battleship Cruiser Class oil !
 
Messages
4,450
Location
Kuwait
 Originally Posted By: StevieC
I use 10w30 in my Austin Mini, why do British cars need thicker oil? It doesn't burn or leak any. (Yet!)
According to a Technical Advisor I've spoken to from a European lubricant firm, the general assumption is the oil's used in higher revving engines for longer periods of time, over a series of short trips. Also, they're more concerned with ACEA as opposed to the API.
 
Messages
1,648
Location
Little Rock, AR
 Originally Posted By: Falcon_LS
According to a Technical Advisor I've spoken to from a European lubricant firm, the general assumption is the oil's used in higher revving engines for longer periods of time, over a series of short trips. Also, they're more concerned with ACEA as opposed to the API.
Then those Castrol 20w50 ads that ran thru the '80s and early '90s were correct - "20w50 for a high reving engine". It worked on me. I think I ran that stuff in my Subaru, my Datsun B210 (which I burned up the engine on*), my '85 Mazda GLC (sport) and my '88 Mazda 323. (* had an overheating problem. Mechanic "fixed" it. Next day I'm doing my 40 mile commute to work (listening to music, not paying attention). Feel like I hit a headwind gust, see smoke all in the rearview mirror. Sold it a few days later for $75 to the Salvage yard.)
 
Messages
4,009
Location
Calgary Canada
 Originally Posted By: Pablo
Well actually you can't use UOA's to judge "wear", and if you do - you will see metal amounts in PPM over miles is less with synthetic when you get beyond 3-4-5K, under 3K about the same. You also forgot that synthetic oil excels in turbo applications and in cases where a higher viscosity is wanted at operating temps without sacrificing low temperature flow.
Fair enough. I knew there would be add-ons, that's why I used the word "generally". The point I was trying to make is that dino oils are really good these days, and in my own opinion synthetics are needed only for unusual conditions like the ones described here. The turbo application in my mind relates to an overheating (at the turbo) condition. And I'll grant you that you can't get a 0w-40 in a dino oil.
 
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