synthetic oil compatibility with plastic parts

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One thing I read about the downside of the synthetic oil is that it might have compatibility issues with plastic engines parts. Of course, I don't know the plastic material that my engine uses (Mazda3 2007, 2.0L I4). According to the factory manual, it uses a plastic oil strainer, and plastic cylinder head cover which I can see. Is this concern substantial? A Q/A on the M1 website did not provide answer as they stated they don't have the information.
 
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If it was really a problem I think it would be listed in your owners manual and it would definitely be all over these forums. I mean look at how much M1 [censored] there is here and we can't even prove its a problem.
 
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Some synthetic stocks can embrittle resin TC guides on chain motors - I recall reading a bit back that BMW had some issues with their VANOS setup.
 
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I've got alotta plastic/resin components in my engine (valve covers, intake, timing chain guides) and have always used synthetic oil - albeit Amsoil in that particular motor. 7 years running
 
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 Originally Posted By: SHAMUS
My understanding is that it is only PAOs that showed this problem. Trying to remember where I read this.
Never heard of this either, wonder if it has any merit?
 
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There was some seal problems 30 years ago with synt. but all seals,etc are synt compatable, and have been for many years now.
 
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"Potential stress cracking of plastic components like POM (polyoxymethylene) in the presence of PAOs (polyalphaolefins)." From Wikipedia; Disadvantages of synthetic oils.
 
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 Originally Posted By: SHAMUS
"Potential stress cracking of plastic components like POM (polyoxymethylene) in the presence of PAOs (polyalphaolefins)." From Wikipedia; Disadvantages of synthetic oils.
Interesting, i've never heard this before.
 
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Not sure how much POM is in your engine. OTOH, wiki is not exactly a credible source. People have been using PAO synthetics in engines with plastics for many years, with zero issues. I don't think this is a real concern in a formulated motor oil.
 
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 Originally Posted By: Pablo
Not sure how much POM is in your engine. OTOH, wiki is not exactly a credible source. People have been using PAO synthetics in engines with plastics for many years, with zero issues. I don't think this is a real concern in a formulated motor oil.
Come on Pablo, you dont haver any data on this issue. Not hearing about it doesnt mean the problem doesnt exist. All the guides embrittled and fell apart in my 98 M-roadster and the chain was grinding thru my front cover. Not sure of the material used by BMW in the guides.
 
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The disadvantages of synthetic motor oils include: • Potential stress cracking of plastic components like POM (polyoxymethylene) in the presence of PAOs (polyalphaolefins). Polyoxymethylene[ (POM), in the USA also commonly known under DuPont's brand name Delrin, is an engineering plastic, a polymer with the chemical formula -(-O-CH2-)n-. It is often marketed and used as a metal substitute, Delrin is a lightweight, low-friction, and wear-resistant thermoplastic with good physical and processing properties and capable of operating in temperatures in excess of 90 degrees Celsius (approx 200 degrees Fahrenheit). According to the material safety data sheet from DuPont, the material has a slight odor of formaldehyde.[1] It is also known as polyacetal, acetal resin, polytrioxane, polyformaldehyde, and paraformaldehyde; the latter term is usually restricted to the short-chained polymer. The plastic is sold under the trade names Kepital, Celcon, Hostaform and Ultraform, the last three being copolymers. Polyalphaolefin is by far the most common major synthetic base oil used in industrial and automotive lubricants. It is a synthetic hydrocarbon (SHC) that mimics the best hydrocarbon (branched) structure found in mineral oils. [b][/b]
 
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Originally Posted by Pablo
OTOH, wiki is not exactly a credible source. ...
confused no-no If I had to choose only one thing on the internet, it would be wikipedia approved
 
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True or not, i had also heard rumors about synthetic oil not being friendly with some seals ... and asked an expert and was told that if any, the DI packs should be the concern and not the base oil. Is the DI pack used in synthetics oil same as DI packs used for blends or conventional or do they have different chemicals?
 
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