Stuck Spark Plugs. Any tips??

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'99 Chevy Cavalier with 170,000 miles - 2.2L OHV. Went to change the plugs, and I'm having trouble with 3 of the 4 plugs. Tried slight tightening and then loosening, multiple applications of PB Blaster over ~8 hours without luck. Other suggestions?
 
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Get engine up to temp and slowly pour in MMO until engine dies. Don't dump it in!!! It will hydro lock. Let it sit 2-3 hrs. Try it again, its worked for me a couple of times. The PB Blaster is good for soaking from the top too. GOOD LUCK!!!!!!!!
 

99Saturn

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I should have added - this car has had a leaking valve cover for quite some time. And I was doing everything stone cold.
 
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Originally Posted By: 99Saturn
I should have added - this car has had a leaking valve cover for quite some time. And I was doing everything stone cold.
Heat can make a difference, I'd try that first.
 
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It's going to take some time. Tighten plug just a smidge, then try to loosen it just a bit. leave at that position, soak overnight with pb blaster. Do same thing the next day. 1/16 tighten to 2/16 of a turn loosened if possible. slow but steady. if no luck with pb blaster, try break free gun oil with the same procedure.
 
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Nick1994

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I've had spark plugs stuck, I just got some motor oil and poured a little bit down the hole and waited 30 minutes. Came out great
 
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seriously? is this engine related? design flaw? I have never had any spark plugs having issues coming out and this is with them having 160k+ on 4 of them with iridium plugs... my experience is only with honda and toyota though, so can't speak of any other manufacturer. have owned a 96 civic that even had copper plugs, they always came out easily... never applied any anti-seize either, it says on the ngk/denso plugs that there is no need to apply any lubricant (I think I read it on the box, not 100% sure)
 
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99Saturn

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How hot should I let it get (yes I realize that's subjective, but I'm assuming not a 1 hour highway run)? My concern was changing hot and damaging the threads. I'm currently (at least by my feel) not getting any movement tightening and loosing. I can't comment on how long they've been in. They at least don't appear to be original, since they are Bosch plugs and Carquest wires.
 
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Originally Posted By: 99Saturn
'99 Chevy Cavalier with 170,000 miles - 2.2L OHV. Went to change the plugs, and I'm having trouble with 3 of the 4 plugs. Tried slight tightening and then loosening, multiple applications of PB Blaster over ~8 hours without luck. Other suggestions?
i am taking your slight tightening and loosening comment to mean you had a small movement...if so then stick with this slowly, they should come out if you are having some slight progress just going to take some time soaking. would hate to think they are completely seized. aluminum head?
 
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I would put everything back together and add a bottle of Gumout with Regane High Mileage for a full tank. Then I'd take the plug wires off the plugs and spray PB Blaster around the plugs. Leave for an hour to soak, then gently try too loosen each one. Wait another 15 mins and gently tighten, then try to loosen each one. When they each "crack" let PB Blaster work for another hour, then SLOWLY remove each one. The idea behind the Gumout is to make sure the exposed threads of the spark plugs are clear of carbon buildup, snagging them in the head.
 
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More pb blaster and some motor oil or ATF. Try giving the ratchet a whack with a rubber hammer or dead blow hammer. I had some recently that we're stuck in an escort, took a few days of pb blaster and pounding on the ratchet for them to loosen up
 
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Originally Posted By: Falken
I would put everything back together and add a bottle of Gumout with Regane High Mileage for a full tank. Then I'd take the plug wires off the plugs and spray PB Blaster around the plugs. Leave for an hour to soak, then gently try too loosen each one. Wait another 15 mins and gently tighten, then try to loosen each one. When they each "crack" let PB Blaster work for another hour, then SLOWLY remove each one. The idea behind the Gumout is to make sure the exposed threads of the spark plugs are clear of carbon buildup, snagging them in the head.
I like this idea, playing it by ear or feel as to how long to allow the soaking of penetrant...
 
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Originally Posted By: 99Saturn
'99 Chevy Cavalier with 170,000 miles - 2.2L OHV. Went to change the plugs, and I'm having trouble with 3 of the 4 plugs. Tried slight tightening and then loosening, multiple applications of PB Blaster over ~8 hours without luck. Other suggestions?
3 ft. breaker bar and a 3 lb. sledgehammer?!?! J/K! Don't break a plug off in the head!
 
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Originally Posted By: 01_celica_gt
seriously? is this engine related? design flaw? I have never had any spark plugs having issues coming out and this is with them having 160k+ on 4 of them with iridium plugs... my experience is only with honda and toyota though, so can't speak of any other manufacturer. have owned a 96 civic that even had copper plugs, they always came out easily... never applied any anti-seize either, it says on the ngk/denso plugs that there is no need to apply any lubricant (I think I read it on the box, not 100% sure)
There are a few real PITA engines for this! Old Dagenham built Ford iron head engines were notorious, when you bought one used you better make sure the plugs come out or there is a good chance your going to be pulling the head. No manufacturer is going to advocate anti seize unless there is a problem eg Ford modular TSB. There are multiple issues with it at the consumer use level. * There are multiple types of anti seize compounds, you should use the correct type for the cylinder head material. * Torque values are affected by anti seize, the amount of torque reduction must be taken into account. * Too much of it and it gets on the electrodes will short the plugs causing a misfire and possible cat damage (manufacturers must warranty the cat for a long time). Given these issues it presents a liability they just as soon not deal with. The coatings on plugs do work but its not 100%, stuck plugs can still happen. Anti seize is fine and does prevent the issue but it needs to be applied properly. A very thin film on the threads only and reduce the torque by 25% and you will never have a problem with it or stuck plugs. If someone just lathers up the plug with the cap brush and strong arm tightens the plug in then there sure can be problems. I have been using it for 42 years professionally and never had an issue of any kind with it in any engine.
 
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Originally Posted By: 01_celica_gt
seriously? is this engine related? design flaw? I have never had any spark plugs having issues coming out and this is with them having 160k+ on 4 of them with iridium plugs... my experience is only with honda and toyota though, so can't speak of any other manufacturer.
It's probably not a design flaw. When spark plugs are new, they have a thin coating of zinc (or something) on the steel threaded body. In the aluminum engine head, the zinc sacrifices itself so there will be little or no corrosion on the threads of the aluminum head. When you remove the plugs, you can frequently feel the 'snap' as the zinc layer shears off. You can see the same thing on many steel fasteners threaded into aluminum parts (e.g. the intake manifold). If you should re-install the plugs, get some anti-seize compound and use it liberally. Better yet, use anti-seize compound all the time, on new or used plugs and on any fasteners. Just recall that the torque value will be less than the 'dry' torque spec.
 
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