Stripped threads on oil pan

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3,234
Location
Richmond, VA
Last oil change I replaced the drain plug on mom's 04 Pilot. Used an AZ part that I confirmed again today was the correct thread and size. Pulling it out today it was kind of stubborn but I attributed it to being new. Went to put it back in and about the fourth pull of the socket wrench I knew something was wrong. Pulled the plug out and there was a bit of the threads on the plug...uh oh. Determined to finish the oil change since mom needed the car ASAP I ran up to AAP and bought another plug and forced it in. Last couple turns were tough, but she aint coming out again. Guess a new oil pan is in order....or maybe a mityvac? Glad I used PU, for once in my life I am going to resist the temptation to change oil at 5k. Also did the oil change on my Vue, easy as could be. PU and a cartridge Puro classic. The computer said I had 50% left on the OCI, but I had just turned 7k on the oil and picked up this car in January from a guy that didn't change the oil enough so I am not going to stretch out OCI's.
 

Barkleymut

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3,234
Location
Richmond, VA
And oh yeah BTW, I curse a LOT when changing the oil in the Pilot. Stupid Honda people made the oil cap near impossible to remove, put it too far down (Need a funnel), made the drain so that when you remove the plug it always hits something and splatters everywhere, and half the time I cut my forearm while removing the oil filter. My wife told her today she better buy a Ford next time or she doesn't get free oil changes while visiting the grandkids :p
 
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15,882
Location
NE,Ohio
it requires dropping the subframe and exhaust(IIRC) and possibly an alignment. I'd just get an oversize drain plug, or an oversize with piggyback drainplug(probably better idea). it should be a M14 X 1.50? edit: http://www.oreillyauto.com/site/c/detail...8&ppt=C0142 ? does S.O. mean single oversize ( saw standard, S.O., double oversize and triple oversize as options on some of these.
 
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Barkleymut

Thread starter
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3,234
Location
Richmond, VA
Thanks for the idea, I glanced at the oil pan today and knew it wouldn't be easy.... hope the plug I jammed in there today comes out. Yeah it was a M14
 
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Messages
17,501
Location
Clovis, CA
"Last oil change I replaced the drain plug on mom's 04 Pilot." Why was the first drain plug changed? You skipped over that part of the story.
 
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35,706
Location
NY
Years ago I had a beater with a stripped oil pan. They made a plug that looked like a nipple, that came with a tool [plastic] that you pushed into the center of the nipple, turned it slightly and removed the nipple to drain the oil. When you were finished you pushed the nipple back in with the tool, turned the tool and removed it for a perfect seal! I probably got 5 years out of it, before the car got destroyed. I'd check and see if that still exists.
 
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2,331
Location
Middle of Iowa
I had a Saturn Vue with the Honda 3.5L and had a quickie lube place strip out the plug in the cast AL pan. Next time around I just JB welded a Fumoto valve in place - never had another problem, and oil changes were even easier.
 

Barkleymut

Thread starter
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3,234
Location
Richmond, VA
Originally Posted By: Merkava_4
"Last oil change I replaced the drain plug on mom's 04 Pilot." Why was the first drain plug changed? You skipped over that part of the story.
the head on the old bolt was starting to round off a bit
 
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789
Location
Lynchburg, VA, USA
I would shy away from continuing to use a traditional plug. Every time your remove it now some of the thread will come with it and eventually you will not be able to get a seal. I had this happen to me on an aluminum pan on a Jetta. I'm with riff1006, I would Loctite a Fumoto valve in place. Problem solved... and a lot cheaper than a new pan.
 
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6,170
Location
North Coast
Originally Posted By: SF0059
I would shy away from continuing to use a traditional plug. Every time your remove it now some of the thread will come with it and eventually you will not be able to get a seal. I had this happen to me on an aluminum pan on a Jetta. I'm with riff1006, I would Loctite a Fumoto valve in place. Problem solved... and a lot cheaper than a new pan.
+1
 
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12,925
Location
Northern Kentucky
JB weld plus fumoto valve now sounds like the best idea. Or JB weld plus the piggy back plug if you want to save a few bucks. The JB would probably be stronger than any loctite.
 
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2,287
Location
Canada
Originally Posted By: Barkleymut
Last oil change I replaced the drain plug on mom's 04 Pilot.
Does this vehicle have a cast-aluminum oil pan or a pressed-steel one? I'm surprised nobody has yet suggested the usual pro (and Honda-approved) solution: a Time-Sert. And, just by-the-bye, the one-and-only reason these plugs strip is that the installer has failed to torque the bolt to the correct figure each and every time. The fact that the original was "rounded off" is a vivid sign of poor-technique having been used in the past.
 

Barkleymut

Thread starter
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3,234
Location
Richmond, VA
If I had to guess I would say it is aluminum. And yes I always over tighten drain plugs, I cannot sleep well if I didn't put that bolt in super tight smile
 
Messages
25,990
Location
MA, Mittelfranken.de
Originally Posted By: Tegger
Originally Posted By: Barkleymut
Last oil change I replaced the drain plug on mom's 04 Pilot.
Does this vehicle have a cast-aluminum oil pan or a pressed-steel one? I'm surprised nobody has yet suggested the usual pro (and Honda-approved) solution: a Time-Sert. And, just by-the-bye, the one-and-only reason these plugs strip is that the installer has failed to torque the bolt to the correct figure each and every time. The fact that the original was "rounded off" is a vivid sign of poor-technique having been used in the past.
spank Don't say use a torque wrench on a drain plug here on BITOG! Its the mark of a rank amateur, there is no need, any mechanic should have the "feel" and so on. Those remarks have been repeated here again and again even though they are absolutely 100% incorrect. LOL Good call Tegger. A timesert kit for this pan cost about $130 and does require a small amount of skill to do it right. I bet the OP could have the Honda dealer do this repair for the same or less if he brings the oil, providing he hasn't used an over sized plug already. http://www.threaddoctor.com/time-sert-14...-kit-p-200.html
 
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2,287
Location
Canada
Originally Posted By: Trav
A timesert kit for this pan cost about $130
I'll bet it will be a lot cheaper than having a new pan installed!
 
Messages
25,990
Location
MA, Mittelfranken.de
No doubt about that. The dealer will have the tool if its a Honda fix so he will only pay for one timesert and what, about half an hour labor? Maybe $100.
 
Messages
5,108
Location
Columbus,Nebraska
Originally Posted By: Barkleymut
And oh yeah BTW, I curse a LOT when changing the oil in the Pilot. Stupid Honda people made the oil cap near impossible to remove, put it too far down (Need a funnel), made the drain so that when you remove the plug it always hits something and splatters everywhere, and half the time I cut my forearm while removing the oil filter. My wife told her today she better buy a Ford next time or she doesn't get free oil changes while visiting the grandkids :P
Honda engineers seem to have a well honed skill set for making oil changes just as difficult as possible. I had two Civics and an Accord, and every time I changed the oil, I used every profane curse word I knew from being around pipefitters and boiler makers many years. I had those designers changing oil on Civics and Accords the rest of their lives;drain hot oil, run the engine until the oil was about 220F and drain it again. No use of shop lifts. Jack stand only. FOREVER
 
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