Sticking windows

JHZR2

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44,823
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New Jersey
The rear windows in my cars get seldom use. In fact, I've noticed that these windows actually start to stick to the rubber which they are gasketed to. It is the rubber at the top, probably because it gets hot/soft in the sun, then starts to seep on the glass. Ive tried cleaning the window tops with glass cleaner to help this, but to no avail. I suppose I need to somehow treat the top of the window, or its surrounding gaskets to prevent this. Any suggestions? Of course it would need to be something that will not run or weep when wet, and something that need only be applied very sparingly. I can imagine that Krytox, talcum powder or silicone spray may be a good idea. Not sure if anyone has noticed this, and what might be recommended. Thanks!
 
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8,367
Location
Texas
Dry lube sprayed liberally around the weatherstrip an inside the channel all around. We do this at the factory when the windows roll up/down slowly due to the new run channels being tight. Benefit of drylube over silicone sprays and others is it is not messy and won't drip all over your glass.
 
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25,045
Location
ON, Canada eh?
I would use a silicone spray on lubricant on the outside and a bit of petroleum jelly on the inside touching the window, put it on thick and let it sit for an hour or so. Then put the window up/down a few times and clean off the excess that gets on the window and you will be home free pretty much for the rest of the cars life. I touch up the outside with the silicone spray every year just before the winter season... To not get the spray on your glass, cut a piece of cardboard to size and slip it in between the glass and the rubber seal and spray, this will soak up the excess... I do it with all my new cars. \:\!
 

JHZR2

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New Jersey
Wow, fast replies... OK, clarification please: -what is dry lube? What kind/brand? Are you talking for example the liquid wrench dry lube with PTFE? -Silicone spray is applied to what? The upper fraction of a centimeter of the window? Into the actual gasket? It is awful tight, how do you ensure that it goes the right way if it is a spray?
 

JHZR2

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New Jersey
sorry, being stupid... So I suppose you roll the window all the way down, then take silicone with a little straw and spray it into the window gasket? What "bottom" section does the PJ go onto? The bottom felt at the bottom of the window, where it would smear the window all the way up, and get on your arm when you sick it out the window? I understand that it is just tiny quantities, but all the same, the application of the PJ as you describe is non-obvious. The silicone makes sense, I suppose... though applying only small quantities I would imagine to be a tough job! Thanks very much!
 
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25,045
Location
ON, Canada eh?
Yes only on the bottom felt section. It prevents the glass from sticking to it in the heat/cold. It will smear the first couple of times you put up/down, but you just wipe it off to find the happy medium of where the rubber is protected and doesn't stick, but it no longer smears the glass.
 

JHZR2

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New Jersey
 Originally Posted By: Jim 5
Gummi-pflege
We don't get the good stuff that BMW used to offer, and is available in Germany. Ive tried to take Mori's suggestion of stag tallow for the seals, and have been using SPG bullet lube, which is a combination of beeswax and stag tallow that does not go rancid. It is a stick and a bit tough to get into the gap on the window, thus why Im looking for something else. The GP that BMW sells now is quite runny. That is a good option.
 
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By Detroit
The outside compartment doors on my motorhome were sticking to their rubber gaskets. I sprayed the gaskets with silicon lubricant and they don't stick anymore.
 
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588
Location
Chicago, IL
For stuff like this, I like to use silicone grease like dielectric. I slather it on and get it good and deep into the medium, and then I polish it off. Leaves a nice finish that rarely smears, and polishing it off keeps the "mass" of the goop from slowing things down.
 
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23,591
 Originally Posted By: JHZR2
Ive tried to take Mori's suggestion of stag tallow for the seals, and have been using SPG bullet lube, which is a combination of beeswax and stag tallow that does not go rancid. It is a stick and a bit tough to get into the gap on the window, thus why Im looking for something else.
Stag tallow is for rubber gaskets on doors, trunklid, hood, sun and moonroofs, etc. It will smear window seals -- if you can even apply it there.
 
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9,427
Location
Pensacola & Vero Beach FL
It also helps if you make a point of "exercising" little-used systems from time to time. Each summer, I make a point of cranking the heat up to max to flood fresh coolant through heater core. I then hasten the "re-cooling" of the car by opening my infrequently used right-side windows. My car is also single-passenger 99% of the time. Every now and then, I run that seat all the way up and back a couple times. Regular exercise is a good thing... ;\)
 

Kestas

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The Motor City
Have you ever bought a rubber product, and noticed the white powder on it? The powder is zinc stearate, a mold release and anti-stick agent. I know it's not commonly available, though I have some and know where I can order it. I just wanted to throw in this tidbit of information.
 
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8,367
Location
Texas
[quote=JHZR2]what is dry lube? What kind/brand? Are you talking for example the liquid wrench dry lube with PTFE?quote] Yes, thay will work. It goes on all wet like silicone but without nearly the mess and drys almost instantly and leaves dry lube behind. Agsin - this is how we do it in the assembly plant on new vehicles.
 
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4,009
Location
Calgary Canada
 Originally Posted By: Kestas
Have you ever bought a rubber product, and noticed the white powder on it? The powder is zinc stearate, a mold release and anti-stick agent. I know it's not commonly available, though I have some and know where I can order it. I just wanted to throw in this tidbit of information.
Interesting. First deer tallow, now zinc with beef or cocoa tallow! Fair amount of animal fats being used here.
 
Messages
4,009
Location
Calgary Canada
 Originally Posted By: ekpolk
It also helps if you make a point of "exercising" little-used systems from time to time. Each summer, I make a point of cranking the heat up to max to flood fresh coolant through heater core. I then hasten the "re-cooling" of the car by opening my infrequently used right-side windows. My car is also single-passenger 99% of the time. Every now and then, I run that seat all the way up and back a couple times. Regular exercise is a good thing... ;\)
Good idea. Never really thought of that for my vehicles, and am going to add this to my routine. Use it or lose it.
 
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298
Location
The OC
I got a tip from a dealer to use a dry silicon. I use one from DuPont. The wet silicon makes more of a mess but works as well. The dry silicon is excellent
 
Messages
23,591
 Originally Posted By: Kestas
Have you ever bought a rubber product, and noticed the white powder on it? The powder is zinc stearate, a mold release and anti-stick agent. I know it's not commonly available, though I have some and know where I can order it. I just wanted to throw in this tidbit of information.
Silicone based mold release (for silicone and rubber molds) is commonly available at any artist, casting and mold making supply shop. Talcum (baby) powder is also a common mold release (when casting white metal, tin, lead, bismuth etc). I would advise against using mold release powder if there's a chance you will breathe it in (when you slam the door, open or close the window etc), especially if it contains things other than asbestos-free talcum powder. The baby powder version is (supposedly) lead-free, other talcum powder may be full of asbestos.
 
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