SR-71: Power by Chevrolet, Rubber by Goodrich

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Bar none that has been my favorite jet since I first read about it. What a frigging hot rod! Black birds and warthogs!
 
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Originally Posted By: ls1mike
Interesting. I have very limited knowledge about how these engines work, but if it needs a separate engine to start, what if it suffers a casualty where the engine shuts off and it can be restarted. Is it possible?
If it had a "flame out" in flight it used the air flowing through the engine and a very reactive chemical called "TEB" to restart the engine. The F-16 is also dependant on a start cart but it uses air from the cart to start the engine, not a direct coupling. Emergency power is provided by a small generator that runs on hydrazine like a rocket engine.
The F16 does not use a cart start and does not use air to start the engine.
 
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The F16 does not use a cart start and does not use air to start the engine.
You are correct, I confused the Test cell/hush house engine testing air start kit with the actual airframe. I was backshop when I worked on them a long time ago.
Would you like contribute knowledge Of the hydraulic JFS system?
 
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Few years back took my nephew to the National Museum of the United States Air Force, @ Wright-Patterson AFB in Dayton. in the Museum Proper, the planes are of course off limits to touch. they're museum pieces. They also have a couple Hangers over on the main base, that you can visit (until they raise the funds to expand the museum itself) one with retired Presidential aircraft(Air Force 1's) you can go through, and an R&D Gallery. filled with various prototypes and "Test" craft. these, they let you get up close an even touch (at least back then). among that collection is the the sole YF-12 (Air Force Version of the CIA's A-12 oxcart, served as "prototype" for the SR-71) that still exists. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lockheed_YF-12 http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lockheed_A-12 http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lockheed_SR-71_Blackbird http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/National_Museum_of_the_United_States_Air_Force

Cant lie,the CIA gets all the cool stuff. Our cousin worked for them and I can only imagine the stories. These planes are a Modern Marvel. Thanks for sharing.
 
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And Goodrich is still a major aviation supplier, now part of Raytheon Technologies(the non-building systems business of United Technologies).
 
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