soundproofing or conditioning

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I decided I didn't want much outside noise or reverberations from the metal surfaces in my Corvair, so I covered the floor with eDead sound material.
 
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Looks nice. Have you driven the car with it yet? I dynamatted my car in an effort to reduce tire noise and I did dynamat plus foam in the doors. What I found was tire noise was about the same but it did help with wind noise and outside noise in the doors. Another item it helped with was not being able to hear the stereo outside of the car. I can have it very loud inside with the windows up and you can't hear it at all. With the stock setup it was so loud outside that people on the outside could hear my phone converstaions perfectly when I had my HFL on and talking on the phone. If I had it to do again, I would only use products like e-dead and dynamat in small squares on a panel, but not the entire panel. It's not necessary as it barely blocks sound. It just stops resonances.
 
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I've thought of that for my CJ7 because it's rather noisey as is (even with hardtop on!) but also to help keep the heat out from the engine. Lots of heat comes thru the firewall and floor since its just steel and thin carpet w/o insulation.
 

widman

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That is about 28 lbs of weight. I sandwiched the firewall between two sheets of Dynamat Hoodliner. I used that on my turbo diesel 4Runner and it made a huge difference. The dynamat is much lighter. Monday I'll start on the carpeting. I put 2 or 3 coats of undercoating under the floor and 2 in the doors. I drove it out to the lake last week... about 20 miles or so. Drives very nicely, but without tags I have to watch for cops. Still working on the tags, although I'm getting closer.
 
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 Originally Posted By: widman
That is about 28 lbs of weight. I sandwiched the firewall between two sheets of Dynamat Hoodliner. I used that on my turbo diesel 4Runner and it made a huge difference. The dynamat is much lighter. Monday I'll start on the carpeting. I put 2 or 3 coats of undercoating under the floor and 2 in the doors. I drove it out to the lake last week... about 20 miles or so. Drives very nicely, but without tags I have to watch for cops. Still working on the tags, although I'm getting closer.
How much of a difference in sound did you see?
 
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 Originally Posted By: BuickGN
How much of a difference in sound did you see?
EDead is great stuff; I have used their mat type products and their liquid products in the past with great success. Dampers, such as pictured above, add mass to the object they are attached too. The object with mass loading is to lower the resonant frequency, thereby reducing the odd rattles and squeaks. These damper type products are not really intended to block or muffle road noise, though they do help. To block road noise, you’re going to want to use a product designed to convert sound waves (pressure waves) into heat. There are several fiber and foam products on the market that do this, many of them are composite materials...consisting of a foam primary layer, with a heavy vinyl backing to further block sound. These can be pretty pricey, so a decent cheap alternative is carpet pad...which is really a combination of open and closed cell foam. That said, damping products make a car feel more "solid"...and that is desirable to many people. The way I describe it, is a damper will make your car feel German and really helps on rough roads at low speeds. Noise blocking products will help with highway noise, and will muffle high speed wheel and wind noise better. That said a good deal of your ultimate success depends on what kind of car you started with. Cheaper cars typically use thinner glass....and the windows on a car are the primary conduits for noise. You’re never going to get a metro to be as quiet as a Benz, though you will improve the metro with the right products. I have a Ford Focus, and about 4 years ago I installed roughly 140sqft of damping material (all Edead), and roughly 60sqft of noise blocking material (foam pad). The end result was a rather solid economy car...much more solid feeling than any compact I have been in to date. It also has absolutely no rattles, even with a big stereo. That said there is still pronounced tire and wind noise at 80mph, less than stock, but still more than a luxury car. The limiting factor on the Focus, as I would suspect on many other cars, is the glass quality.
 
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Is there a way to permanently attach this material to the roof of a station wagon, to reduce the loud booming noise created by the large roof? Putting it on the outside would probably make it stay put, but...
 

widman

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I will never really know how much it reduced the noise, as I those who have followed my restoration will know that it had never been drivable. As noted, a lot depends on the car you start with. I my case a 49 year old car where I replaced much of the floor panels, and sound insulation was not known then. I'm sure I would see very little change if I tried doing it to my 2009 Grand Cherokee, but I'd probably see results if I put it on my 2009 Outlander, particularly the "tin" sounding doors. As for the roof, pull your headliner and stick this stuff on. There is a site I should have bookmarked where various products are tested for adherence to vertical and upside down surfaces in heat and cold. Considering everything I used had to come in my suitcase, I used fiberglass between my headliner and roof. More for heat reduction here in the sun at 6000 ft above sea level.
 
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 Originally Posted By: oilyriser
Is there a way to permanently attach this material to the roof of a station wagon, to reduce the loud booming noise created by the large roof? Putting it on the outside would probably make it stay put, but...
Edead makes a liquid version of their damping products that would easily stick to a roof. Additionally, they make an upgraded version of Edead that should stick to a roof. I have used the liquid, and almost prefer it for its ease of application. That said, it doesn't go as far for the money. Secondskinaudio.com makes probobly the best damping mat on the market (you pay for it though $$$). If I was worried about sticking something upside down (roof) in a high heat environment, this is what I would use. Dynamat Extreme is a close second (also expensive).
 
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