Snow vs ice tire

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Seems to me, one should not compromise on ice traction for snow. Bad snow traction means you don't get moving while bad ice traction means you go flying off into the woods when you hit black ice. Putting that aside, I seem to think snow and slush is what I need more of for my truck. What might be good for it? I'm being cheap, yes, but wondering just the same. I found some rims so I have that part taken care now. Am wondering if there are some cheap all terrains or the like for the job.
 
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This is a second set of tires for winter use? Just get the Nokian Hakkapeliitta LT2 and order them factory-studded. Problem solved. My favorite A/T options are the Goodyear Wrangler SilentArmor and Michelin LTX M/S2 and A/T2. The Cooper and General A/T options are decent too. Still, if it's for winter use only, I'd want a winter tire.
 

supton

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No studs. While I've never run studded tires I've always assumed that the noise would drive me nuts. I do an easy 90% highway driving. Edit: truck has Michelin LTX ms2 and I wasn't greatly impressed last winter. I might try weight in bed first this year but am wondering.
 
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Four sandbags over the axle in a frame made out of pressure treated 2x6 boards helped out my old Tacoma quite a bit. You can order the same Nokians without studs.
 
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Any snow tires I have used definitely had increased ice traction as well. Usually a softer compound with many sipes to allow more grip on the ice.
 
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No difference now between snow and ice tires, just marketing. 20+ years ago Bridgestone Blizzak's were revolutionary with the multicell compound and made winter tires a big business. Now everyone offers something in the WINTER tire category. Most winter tires are not that great in slush because it's really just heavy water. Look at a modern winter tire and there's not much water evacuation area, just loads of sipes. Longitudinal ribs help water but suck in snow so there's not much compromise except for changing the compound to help a bit. Michelin LTX M/S have always been good in snow for an A/S tire so maybe just add some weight. The tire has been around for more than 20 years for good reason. Since you bought extra wheels, (18" I assume?) the Bridgestone Blizzak DM-V1 is available in your size...look at the tread pattern and you don't see much void.
 
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Originally Posted By: LotI
Most winter tires are not that great in slush because it's really just heavy water...
Well, until you squish the water out of it and it turns to solid ice pretty quickly...
 
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What is snow and what is ice tire? Winter tires are made for both use. Blizzaks are advertised as winter tire, Michelin X Ice imply that they are ice tires. However, in tests Blizzaks proved to be better on ice. So, let's not confuse people. As long as tire is winter tire (M+S with snow flake on the side of the tire) tire is designed for winter conditions, which include ice.
 
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I don't know about adding weight helping black ice. Seems like it would just give you more momentum to stop. Weight would help hydroplaning and help dig through snow to pavement. But would it add enough pressure on a tire-to-ice interface to overcome the fact that you're trying to stop all that weight?
 
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Originally Posted By: eljefino
I don't know about adding weight helping black ice. Seems like it would just give you more momentum to stop. Weight would help hydroplaning and help dig through snow to pavement. But would it add enough pressure on a tire-to-ice interface to overcome the fact that you're trying to stop all that weight?
Tire to ice is what you want and big chunky treadblocks build up a layer of water to slide on. Winter tires give the water a place to go, whether it's a porous compound (Blizzak) or sipes and micro-pumps (X-Ice).
 
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Originally Posted By: LotI
Most winter tires are not that great in slush because it's really just heavy water.
slush isn't really heavy water. It's heavy snow-water mixture. Remember, if you have the same volume of slush compared to an equal volume of water only, the water only is heavier. semantics aside... this is where Nokian has been doing a lot more work lately to also focus on slush-planing, to minimize those affects in their newer winter tire designs
 
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Originally Posted By: UG_Passat
Originally Posted By: LotI
Most winter tires are not that great in slush because it's really just heavy water.
slush isn't really heavy water. It's heavy snow-water mixture. Remember, if you have the same volume of slush compared to an equal volume of water only, the water only is heavier. semantics aside... this is where Nokian has been doing a lot more work lately to also focus on slush-planing, to minimize those affects in their newer winter tire designs
Slush may be semi compressible but it does have many times the viscosity of water which makes it tricky. I found the old Neon with 155 width tires was stellar in snow and slush with any cheap snow tire. The Focus is OK with far "better" 185 width tires in deep snow and slush.
 
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Originally Posted By: IndyIan
Originally Posted By: UG_Passat
Originally Posted By: LotI
Most winter tires are not that great in slush because it's really just heavy water.
slush isn't really heavy water. It's heavy snow-water mixture. Remember, if you have the same volume of slush compared to an equal volume of water only, the water only is heavier. semantics aside... this is where Nokian has been doing a lot more work lately to also focus on slush-planing, to minimize those affects in their newer winter tire designs
Slush may be semi compressible but it does have many times the viscosity of water which makes it tricky. I found the old Neon with 155 width tires was stellar in snow and slush with any cheap snow tire. The Focus is OK with far "better" 185 width tires in deep snow and slush.
WInter tires are the best for slush. Key is that tread blocks have enough space between each other for slush evacuation. That is why I am using Blizzak's and not Michelin XiCe.
 
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255/70-18..... you have studdable winter tires from Cooper and Hankook... 275/65r18... then you have Nokian Rotiiva AT available also, if you need "All-weather" tire (as well as Hakkapeliita LT 2 & R2 SUV as dedicated snows) tirerack with those 2 sizes... no snow tires available.
 
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If the Hakka R2 SUVs come in an appropriate size for your truck, I've found my set to be a great all-around winter tire. They're good in ice and slush and do pretty well on dry, cold pavement. The shoulder lugs are also open and meaty enough to get pretty good bite in fresh snow as well (I've been plowing with the front bumper of the Jeep with no issues, and it goes just fine in 2wd up until I start dragging the axles around 8" or so). I'll have some more info on how they do on something truck sized once CT gets their first good snow, as a friend just picked up a set for his F-150 (in 275/65R18).
 
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