SL/CF rated oils

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37
Location
Bowmanville, Canada
I was noticing recently, that generally the synthetic oils and the "super premium" dino oils are rated SL and CF, whereas the lesser dino oils were only rated SL. I was wondering if anyone else has noticed this as well. Does this additional qualification (CF) of the oil indicate increased quality or ability to protect a gasoline engine?
 

MolaKule

Staff member
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21,688
Location
Iowegia - USA
Just off the top of my head, I believe that refers to diesel engine classifications. (Someone correct me if I'm wrong). The S prefix is for Spark Ignition engines (were now in the SJ/SL series). The C is for Compression Ignition (and industrial) engines. I do not recall what the latest rating is for diesel engines. I don't keep up with diesel engine classifications very much. Bob may have the latest classifcation charts.
 
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1,874
Location
Ocala, Florida
You are correct Molakule. Sx = use for a gas/spark engine Cx = use for a compression/diesel engine x= the version or upgrade level they are at using the alphabet. ie..sa,sb,etc.. at present the latest gas engine oil is rated as API SL, previous was API SJ The latest diesel oil is API CI, previous was API CH-4.
 
Messages
104
Location
Baton Rouge
If the better oils have both the SL & CF certifications, does this also mean that the additive package is also probably better that would give better wear and oxidation numbers and let you go longer between oil changes? Canuk, which oils are you seeing with both certifications?
 
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1,874
Location
Ocala, Florida
Schaeffers supreme 7000 # 700 15w40 has the newest api cert's CI-4/CH-4/SL. This is the newest certifications for a diesel oil/gas engines. If the oil has the SL certification, would indicate that the base oil is better than the older SJ version and with the new CI certification would also indicate a change in the base oil/detergent package as this is one area that is needed to contend with the newer egr emmissions demand being placed on the engines/oil. [ July 09, 2002, 10:31 AM: Message edited by: BOBISTHEOILGUY ]
 

Canuk

Thread starter
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37
Location
Bowmanville, Canada
Kevin in Texas: The oils I noticed that have the SL/CF certification on them were Petro-Canada Supreme and Protec Ultra from Esso. These oils are these company's top mineral oil. They have cheaper mineral oil available, but with only the SL rating. Probably you haven't heard of them in Texas. Regular oils from Pennzoil, Valvoline, Castrol, etc. only seem to have the SL rating. Maybe, you could look on your store shelves down there and notice what I've noticed?
 

Canuk

Thread starter
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37
Location
Bowmanville, Canada
Bob: To clarify. I was wondering if the CF (diesel) qualification on a gasoline oil would provide any increased benefit to a gasoline engine over that of an SL only rated oil. The oils that I'm talking about are 5w-30 and 10w-30 grades, not diesel weights (15w-40, etc).
 
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104
Location
Baton Rouge
quote:
Originally posted by Canuk: Kevin in Texas: The oils I noticed that have the SL/CF certification on them were Petro-Canada Supreme and Protec Ultra from Esso. These oils are these company's top mineral oil. They have cheaper mineral oil available, but with only the SL rating. Probably you haven't heard of them in Texas. Regular oils from Pennzoil, Valvoline, Castrol, etc. only seem to have the SL rating. Maybe, you could look on your store shelves down there and notice what I've noticed?
I should have looked before I posted my last response where you were from. From what I have read about a lot of the gasolines in Canada, especially ESSO, it contains a fair amount of sulfur in it. Hence, the reason why your motor oils also have diesel-type additive packages.
 

Canuk

Thread starter
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37
Location
Bowmanville, Canada
Kevin: So, I take it that the CF qualification provides a quality to the oil that will combat high sulfur in the fuel of both gas and diesel engines.
 
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5,336
Location
London, AR
The Official meaning of the S in SL is SERVICE and refers to oil suitable for gasoline engines, and the C in CI is for COMMERCIAL and is suitable for use in diesel engines. CI/SL are the newest ratings. The CF rating is an old rating for oil that is suitable for diesel engines, but does not have alot of foam inhibitors. I think it was the first one that required it, but not enough for modern day engines without adding foam inhibitors. This oil is good in an old VW Rabbit, Isuzu (non-turbo) ect. So a dual rated oil is good in this case. In a gas engine I don't want the CF rating because I want all the properties geared toward service for a gasoline engine. But in the case of a CI/SL I would used that in a gas turbo, or any severe service because it is 5W40 or 15W40. IMHO
 

MolaKule

Staff member
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21,688
Location
Iowegia - USA
Bot, "The Chevron "SL" isn't "CF" rated, but dino oil doesn't get any more "premium" than this stuff is. " "Resist," "Heavy Duty," "Premium." Some of these words are used for marketing hype and are so meaningless unless well defined in proper context. What do mean when you say "Premium."
 
Messages
454
Location
Cheyenne
I was referring to Canuk's original post. He said the "super premium" synthetics and dinos had both the "SL" and "CF" ratings, whereas the the oils with just an "SL" rating are somehow inferior. I don't think that's the case at all. I think the "CF" rating simply means it can be used in diesel as well as gasoline applications. I don't think "CF" rated oils offer any benefits to gasoline engines over oils which are just "SL" rated. I haven't seen the spec sheet for Pennzoil's "SL", so I don't know if it's as good, or better than the Chevron. However, I think it's safe to say that Chevron's "SL" can be considered a "premium" oil, as it is most certainly one the best dinos available. Besides, I don't know if I could ever go back using any Pennzoil motor oil after listening to all those years of the "grey film" stories.
 
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3,327
Location
Bolivia
Chevron Supreme is SL/CF "API Service Categories SL (SAE 5W-20, 5W-30, 10W-30, 10W-40, 20W-50, 30) SJ, SH1, SG1 CF-2, CF (SAE 40) Energy Conserving for API SL (SAE 5W-20, 5W-30, 10W-30)" They put it on the spec sheet, but not on the bottle. I believe it is also a Group II+ since it is the same base oil (ISOSYN) as Delo which is II+.
 
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3,649
Location
St. Charles County, Missouri
Bottgers--Think I posted before, maybe here, maybe on Edmunds. 10W30 dino oils--all PZ/QS brands including SuperTech and Wolf's Head. SuperTech is SJ (no new sheets available?). Rest are SL. Note that Mobil Drive Clean is none too good. Sorry the spreadsheet will (probably) transfer so messy: 10W30 SuperTech Pennzoil Quaker St. Wolf's Head Valvoline Mobil Exxon Schaeffers Chevron Visc. 40c 73.2 67.0 69.1 65.3 70.8 70.0 71.7 66.0 74.8 Visc 100c 11.0 10.5 10.5 10.5 10.5 10.4 10.5 11.1 10.8 Visc. Indx 140 160 139 138 135 134 132 150 135 Flash-F 410 430 410 430 421 392 408 425 453 Pour-F -29 -33 -22 -17 -33 -33 -33 -41 -36 Low Pumping-C -25 -30 -22 -30 x x x x x
 
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3,649
Location
St. Charles County, Missouri
Questions about those figures I just posted.... 1. If Mobil has a flash point of 392, isn't that almost dangerously low? 2. Can somebody explain to me the value of a high viscoscity index? (I know it's a trade off with too many v.i. improvers and that it's partially dependent on weight) but why, if Chevron is so great (and many of its stats ARE) is its V.I. so low? [Confused]
 

MolaKule

Staff member
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21,688
Location
Iowegia - USA
Questions about those figures I just posted.... 1. If Mobil has a flash point of 392, isn't that almost dangerously low? The Flash Point is the point at above which the "vapors" of the fluid would be ignited with an "open" flame. In other words, you have to get the lubricant hot enough to make it evaporate, and then only if there is "high" concentration of vapors, it might ignite at this temperature. Again, it only refers to the vapors of the fluid, not the liquid itself. 2. Can somebody explain to me the value of a high viscoscity index? (I know it's a trade off with too many v.i. improvers and that it's partially dependent on weight) but why, if Chevron is so great (and many of its stats ARE) is its V.I. so low? The viscosity index (VI) refers to how the fluid changes viscosity (ability to flow) over a specified temperature range. The greater the VI, the more stable its viscosity should be over a wide temperature range. Multigrades usually have wider VI's, whereas straight weights need only be stable over a narrow temp range, so their VI's would be small. I.E., the VI must specified in terms of its context as to whether its straight or multigrade. In general, dinos change greatly over their temp range so a lot of VII (viscosity index improver) must be added to the base oil. This applies to Group I, II, and II+ base, dino oils. Group III base, dino oils have wider or higher VI's. True Synth's (Group IV and V base oils) are more stable over wider temp ranges so they need much less, if any, VII's.
 
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14,013
Location
Retired | Wausau, WI
In the 20 years that I have worked for Pennzoil I have heard a lot of stories, but I have never heard the grey film story. That's a new one. Now a little update: For everyone that loves Chevron. Chevron makes a Group II+ base stock at their refinery in California. Pennzoil makes a Group II+ base stock at their refinery in Louisiana. Both of these use the Chevron additive package. IT'S A SMALL WORLD AND IT'S GETTING SMALLER. [Cheers!]
 

MolaKule

Staff member
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21,688
Location
Iowegia - USA
Grey Film: (A poor black and white movie). Sorry, that's a bad joke! [Big Grin] The only time I had heard about grey films was when some of the early synth's (mostly poorly formulated di-esters) would deposit a film of lead (from the tetraethyl lead octane improver) onto the inside surfaces of the engine. The lead film, however, never harmed anything nor did it ever cause any engine part to fail. Since there is no lead in non-racing engines, grey films are a thing of the past.
 

MolaKule

Staff member
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21,688
Location
Iowegia - USA
CORRECTION [Mad] "Since there is no lead in non-racing engines, grey films are a thing of the past. " [No no] SHOULD HAVE SAID: Since there is no lead in non-racing GASOLINES (or fuels), grey films are a thing of the past. [Embarrassed]
 
Messages
454
Location
Cheyenne
The "CF" rating doesn't necessarily mean that this oil is superior to those with just the "SL" rating for gasoline engine applications. It just means that it meets or exceeds the requirements needed for deisel engines. The Chevron "SL" isn't "CF" rated, but dino oil doesn't get any more "premium" than this stuff is.
 
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