Shortening chain saw chain

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Kestas

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I have a replacement chain for my 16" Montgomery Wards chain saw that has stretched beyond the adjustment limit. I haven't used it much (only one resharpening) and it should still have lots of life left in it. I have a feeling the shop sold me a chain that is slightly too long. According to my measurements, I could easily remove two links and use it further. How can I safely remove two links and put the chain back in service?
 
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a stretched chain will destroy your drive sprocket/clutch and shortening the chain might also mess up the cutter spacing and stagger. If it were me I'd just take it to the saw shop and have them shorten it.
 
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chains don't stretch, they wear in pivot points from lack of oiling check that auto oiler, it's plugged buckers will wear the teeth out before the chain joints wear out. lots of oil
 
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 Originally Posted By: Steelhead
chains don't stretch, they wear in pivot points from lack of oiling
true, but it is just syntax wear at pivot points = longer distance between pivot points = longer chain = "stretched chain"
 

Kestas

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Thanks for the tip. I'll have to take this unit apart and clean the oiler. I'll still check to see how much slop there is in the stretch direction of the chain. Then off to the pro shop for chain work and a spare.
 
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Find a clean surface like a piece of cardboard and run the saw WFO with the blade a couple of inches from the surface. In less than a minute you should see some oil on the surface that's been thrown off the chain. No oil = plugged chain oiler.
 

Kestas

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The pro shop took out a link and said the chain was too long to begin with. I pointed out that I bought the chain at their shop. Anyhow, I read in the owners manual that up to three links can be removed from the chain before it gets tough on the sprocket. I noticed some visible wear on the sprocket. At what point do you replace the sprocket? I've also taken the chain saw apart and made sure the oiler system was clean as a whistle. The problem should disappear.
 
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 Originally Posted By: tom slick
a stretched chain will destroy your drive sprocket/clutch and shortening the chain might also mess up the cutter spacing and stagger. If it were me I'd just take it to the saw shop and have them shorten it.
Mebbe so, but the clutch and sprocket of my 30yr old Stihl are original. Whatever wear they have hasn't affected the saw's performance. I used a punch and removed a link on a set of chains and ran them until there were no teeth left on them.
 
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Just run into this problem chain too long with little wear, culprit was the oil ports on blade clogged. I am in serious hunt to find the right tool for re-linking (shortening chains). I even tried Princess Auto, House of Tools and Peavey Mart, Home Depot etc here in Canada, cant find one. I bought a new chain from Husqvarna dealer which he made from bulk chain spool and he shorten my other chain for free but I would prefer independant maintenance at home. Where can one get the right chain link tool, anyone know? Cyprs
 
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Wow, they sell everything in chainsaw equipt, for price of independance in buying the tool I will go to the dealership, I would rarely use it, thought there were cheaper, thanks Doitmyself, I bookmarked the site, Cyprs
 
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As a 40+ year chain saw user I must say that in the first place never run a chainsaw with a loose chain. The chain can jump off of the bar, go whipping around, and cause serious personal injury or death. I've always been VERY careful about this, and yet, two years ago I negligently ran a saw without first checking the chain slack. The chain jumped the bar track, and almost cut my gut open. The chain runs with a LOT of torque and, usually, speed. You need to check the slack each time you use the saw. It often needs adjustment. If you don't know how to properly and safely remove links, have a professional do it, or get a new, shorter chain. And always check and adjust for slack before using the saw. A chain saw is one of the most dangerous pieces of equipment that a person can use. MANY things can go wrong if you are not properly trained in its use. No one should operate one without training by someone who really knows how to use one and teach others to use one. Also, constantly check the groove all the way around the bar (that the chain runs in). It can get clogged up with sawdust to the point that the chain does not seat all the way down in the track and will jump off of the track.
 
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