Shell Rimula R6LM 10W40 safe in 3.0tdi dpf?

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46
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Netherlands
Hello, I have 20Liter of this oil in stock(ACEA E6/E7/MB.228.51) Shell Rimula tds The car is a 2006 280hp (tuned) Audi A4 quattro 3.0tdi v6 with DPF Can I use this instead of the ´´weaker´´ VW507.00 5W30 oil, wich I don´t like... Ash level rimula is 0,9, the engine burns virtualy no oil, so I don´t think the higher ash level would be a problem.
 
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1,429
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quebec canada
I would use something along the line of mobil ep 10w30 (forget the brand check the spec sheet .)if the oil is around the mobil ep 10w30 value (or better have a even higher hths for same 10 in the 100f even better)the idea being ?to have a 10 at all temperature range till 150 c or as close as possible
 
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1,450
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Alaska
I have been using a somewhat similar 228.51 oil in my 2009 BMW X5 35d, Mobil Delvac 1 LE 5W30. About 32000 mi so far, no problems. My car has DPF/SCR. The Delvac LE has the same Zn/P as the recommended LL04 oil but 1.0% ash instead of the recommended 0.6-0.8%. It also burns no oil. Perhaps one can eventually anticipate shorter DPF life due to higher ash, but since no oil is being burned it might not even happen. I switched because TBN was disappearing too quickly with the very weak C3/LL04 oil. Charlie
 
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12,321
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Colorado Springs
Originally Posted By: WBoer
Hello, I have 20Liter of this oil in stock(ACEA E6/E7/MB.228.51) Shell Rimula tds The car is a 2006 280hp (tuned) Audi A4 quattro 3.0tdi v6 with DPF Can I use this instead of the ´´weaker´´ VW507.00 5W30 oil, wich I don´t like... Ash level rimula is 0,9, the engine burns virtualy no oil, so I don´t think the higher ash level would be a problem.
Higher SAPS in Rimula will not affect DPF right now. If you plan to keep car for some time, it will. I would stick to some thicker 5W30 504.00 like M1 ESP or Shell Helix. MB229.51 is not that strict on SAPS level like VW 504.00/507.00.
 
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1,800
Location
Rijeka, EU
Since OP is without doubt car enthusiast he would be better with just removing DPF and making straight pipe with flanges on both side so he could put it back before MOT. It would only take an hour every year.
 
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2,253
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London, England
Originally Posted By: chrisri
Since OP is without doubt car enthusiast he would be better with just removing DPF and making straight pipe with flanges on both side so he could put it back before MOT. It would only take an hour every year.
Removing a DPF and getting the ecu reprogrammed to not regen has been a solution for a good few years. With your solution you would have to have the ECU reprogrammed twice a year aswell. Was looking into to it for the Jag as i do significant urban miles. However the EU is clamping down hard and in the UK they are looking at the issue as part of Construction & Use regulations which means the penalty is not minor and could invalidate your insurance cover. It is also now part of the MOT test to ensure it is present, obviously you could still gut it and leave it on, but the emissions check would make it obvious that the dpf was missing. Due to my Jag being used as a chauffeur vehicle it has bi annual MOT tests from 1yr on. It hardly registers anything on the emissions test. I currently have Mobil 1 ESP 5w30 C3 in the Jag and it seems to be running well. It is a Citreon engine and they spec 5w30 C2/C3 rather than the C1 of Jaguar. No ill effects so far despite the marginally higher Saps, much in line with the OP.
 
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Messages
1,800
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Rijeka, EU
Originally Posted By: bigjl
Originally Posted By: chrisri
Since OP is without doubt car enthusiast he would be better with just removing DPF and making straight pipe with flanges on both side so he could put it back before MOT. It would only take an hour every year.
Removing a DPF and getting the ecu reprogrammed to not regen has been a solution for a good few years. With your solution you would have to have the ECU reprogrammed twice a year aswell. Was looking into to it for the Jag as i do significant urban miles. However the EU is clamping down hard and in the UK they are looking at the issue as part of Construction & Use regulations which means the penalty is not minor and could invalidate your insurance cover. It is also now part of the MOT test to ensure it is present, obviously you could still gut it and leave it on, but the emissions check would make it obvious that the dpf was missing. Due to my Jag being used as a chauffeur vehicle it has bi annual MOT tests from 1yr on. It hardly registers anything on the emissions test. I currently have Mobil 1 ESP 5w30 C3 in the Jag and it seems to be running well. It is a Citreon engine and they spec 5w30 C2/C3 rather than the C1 of Jaguar. No ill effects so far despite the marginally higher Saps, much in line with the OP.
No,actually you don't need a remap when you remove DPF, at least on some models. I had Bravo Sport with removed DPF and car did drive fine but i only drove it like that for a few weeks. After that i did remap but only for power increase.I was worried at that time so was doing some research, i wasn't first to do so. But i have no experience with VAG cars so this is only a suggestion.
 
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1,187
Location
Australia
Originally Posted By: WBoer
Hello, I have 20Liter of this oil in stock(ACEA E6/E7/MB.228.51) Shell Rimula tds The car is a 2006 280hp (tuned) Audi A4 quattro 3.0tdi v6 with DPF Can I use this instead of the ´´weaker´´ VW507.00 5W30 oil, wich I don´t like... Ash level rimula is 0,9, the engine burns virtualy no oil, so I don´t think the higher ash level would be a problem.
Would it be OK? Maybe, but I wouldn't use HDEO in a light duty engine when it does not carry any light duty specs. Just like I'd never use a CJ-4 in a gasoline engine if it did not carry SN or A3 etc.
 
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2,253
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London, England
3l
Originally Posted By: chrisri
Originally Posted By: bigjl
Originally Posted By: chrisri
Since OP is without doubt car enthusiast he would be better with just removing DPF and making straight pipe with flanges on both side so he could put it back before MOT. It would only take an hour every year.
Removing a DPF and getting the ecu reprogrammed to not regen has been a solution for a good few years. With your solution you would have to have the ECU reprogrammed twice a year aswell. Was looking into to it for the Jag as i do significant urban miles. However the EU is clamping down hard and in the UK they are looking at the issue as part of Construction & Use regulations which means the penalty is not minor and could invalidate your insurance cover. It is also now part of the MOT test to ensure it is present, obviously you could still gut it and leave it on, but the emissions check would make it obvious that the dpf was missing. Due to my Jag being used as a chauffeur vehicle it has bi annual MOT tests from 1yr on. It hardly registers anything on the emissions test. I currently have Mobil 1 ESP 5w30 C3 in the Jag and it seems to be running well. It is a Citreon engine and they spec 5w30 C2/C3 rather than the C1 of Jaguar. No ill effects so far despite the marginally higher Saps, much in line with the OP.
No,actually you don't need a remap when you remove DPF, at least on some models. I had Bravo Sport with removed DPF and car did drive fine but i only drove it like that for a few weeks. After that i did remap but only for power increase.I was worried at that time so was doing some research, i wasn't first to do so. But i have no experience with VAG cars so this is only a suggestion.
You are not correct. A dpf needs to Regen. Wether it uses Eloys or not it still needs to Regen. The ECU triggers a Regen when the sensors sense a reductio in flow. By just removing the insides of the dpf will cause problems. The person that bought that car off you likely had some repairs to do. Dpf removal has been common in the UK since 2005 mainly due to the repeated issues on the Fiat engined Zafira and similar vehicles all fitted with a dpf. The fact the issue was more likely caused by something else and the blocked dpf was just a symptom of the actual problem. My 08 Pathfinder has never had the dpf light come on in nearly 3years of mostly urban driving in and out of London on the A13 in traffic. A dpf removal a remap was on the cards till the change in the regs. Now great care needs to be taken. But then again it does seem only the UK enforces the various dictats from the bloated EU monster.
 
Messages
1,800
Location
Rijeka, EU
Originally Posted By: bigjl
3l
Originally Posted By: chrisri
Originally Posted By: bigjl
Originally Posted By: chrisri
Since OP is without doubt car enthusiast he would be better with just removing DPF and making straight pipe with flanges on both side so he could put it back before MOT. It would only take an hour every year.
Removing a DPF and getting the ecu reprogrammed to not regen has been a solution for a good few years. With your solution you would have to have the ECU reprogrammed twice a year aswell. Was looking into to it for the Jag as i do significant urban miles. However the EU is clamping down hard and in the UK they are looking at the issue as part of Construction & Use regulations which means the penalty is not minor and could invalidate your insurance cover. It is also now part of the MOT test to ensure it is present, obviously you could still gut it and leave it on, but the emissions check would make it obvious that the dpf was missing. Due to my Jag being used as a chauffeur vehicle it has bi annual MOT tests from 1yr on. It hardly registers anything on the emissions test. I currently have Mobil 1 ESP 5w30 C3 in the Jag and it seems to be running well. It is a Citreon engine and they spec 5w30 C2/C3 rather than the C1 of Jaguar. No ill effects so far despite the marginally higher Saps, much in line with the OP.
No,actually you don't need a remap when you remove DPF, at least on some models. I had Bravo Sport with removed DPF and car did drive fine but i only drove it like that for a few weeks. After that i did remap but only for power increase.I was worried at that time so was doing some research, i wasn't first to do so. But i have no experience with VAG cars so this is only a suggestion.
You are not correct. A dpf needs to Regen. Wether it uses Eloys or not it still needs to Regen. The ECU triggers a Regen when the sensors sense a reductio in flow. By just removing the insides of the dpf will cause problems. The person that bought that car off you likely had some repairs to do. Dpf removal has been common in the UK since 2005 mainly due to the repeated issues on the Fiat engined Zafira and similar vehicles all fitted with a dpf. The fact the issue was more likely caused by something else and the blocked dpf was just a symptom of the actual problem. My 08 Pathfinder has never had the dpf light come on in nearly 3years of mostly urban driving in and out of London on the A13 in traffic. A dpf removal a remap was on the cards till the change in the regs. Now great care needs to be taken. Please elaborate. How will ECU trigger regen when sensors will never sense reduction in flow without DPF? Opels do have JTD engines but they run on bespoke electronics and this is why they are slower,worse on fuel and generally more prone to problems. But then again it does seem only the UK enforces the various dictats from the bloated EU monster.
 
Messages
1,800
Location
Rijeka, EU
Please elaborate. What will trigger ECU to start Regen when sensor will never sense increased back pressure without DPF? Opels do have JTD but they run on their own electronics and this is why they performe worse then FIATs and are more prone to problems. Cheers.
 
Messages
588
Location
Stewartstown PA
Would using an ACEA E6 oil actually decrease regenerations because of superior soot dispersants used in heavy duty oil? I know this question might show my lack of knowledge for how exactly regeneration works, but have wondered about that. I have a 2011 tdi which had dpf changed under warranty at 72000 miles because of design flaw according to VW guy. I used 507 oil exclusively before then. Since that time I still use 507 oils mainly but have so tried ACEA E6 oils like Mobil 1 Delvac le and chevron delo 5w30. I have also tried some 5w40 oils like Delvac esp. Have never had noticeable oil consumption and vehicle has 192000 on it now. Again wondered if better soot handling oil would actually benefit the exhaust system if engine is not consuming oil based on dipstick level which consistently is full. Have noticed engine is more sluggish with 5w40 compared to 5w30.
 
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1,009
Location
UK
On the contrary, an ACEA E6 oil might be expected to be more damaging to a DPF. Firstly, the capability of the oil to handle soot in the engine has no bearing on soot in the exhaust gas stream. All it means is the ability of the oil to disperse soot and mitigate its effects (thickening, abrasive wear) once it has entered the oil. ACEA E6 is a 'low SAPS' specification in the context of heavy duty engine oils. However, compared to car engine oils it is actually of a full SAPS type, hence it would be likely to block a DPF with ash more quickly. In the car world, ACEA C2 & C3 (and the associated OEM specs like VW 504/507, BMW LL-04, MB 229.31/51 etc) have a maximum ash level of 0.8 %wt (typically referred to as "mid SAPS"). ACEA C1 and C4 have a maximum ash of 0.5 %wt ("low SAPS"). The ACEA A/B specs are all higher than 0.9 % wt, with A5/B5 going up to 1.6% wt. On the other hand, ACEA E6 has a maximum ash of 1.0 %wt (so 25% more than ACEA C2/C3). This means that up to 25% more ash could be flowing down your exhaust and into the DPF (not taking into account any effects due to viscosity, volatility, engine appetite etc).
 
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