Sealed transmissions.

Joined
Jun 9, 2012
Messages
1,050
Location
Reno, NV
I bought some new fluid for the auto transmission in my 2014 Passat. I googled the method for replacement. Pain in the tush. My theory is the reason for deleting the dipstick is twofold: 1. saves the cost of manufacturing and installing the dipstick & tube. 2. Easier to transport with no escape route for the ATF. I don't think there is any benefit in this for the consumer.
 
I bought some new fluid for the auto transmission in my 2014 Passat. I googled the method for replacement. Pain in the tush. My theory is the reason for deleting the dipstick is twofold: 1. saves the cost of manufacturing and installing the dipstick & tube. 2. Easier to transport with no escape route for the ATF. I don't think there is any benefit in this for the consumer.
It's not really a PITA.

Drain and refill. Make sure fluid is at correct temperature range for proper level (with appropriate scan tool)

It self levels with the level/fill tube.
 
They figured the transmission would last the life of the car? That could be good or bad. Really, there is no access bolt?
 
it stops monkey from touching atf and saves space.

ZF and GM europe were the first to pioneer the dipstick delete while others dragged their feet with locking dipstick tool caps before eventually giving in
 
I bought some new fluid for the auto transmission in my 2014 Passat. I googled the method for replacement. Pain in the tush. My theory is the reason for deleting the dipstick is twofold: 1. saves the cost of manufacturing and installing the dipstick & tube. 2. Easier to transport with no escape route for the ATF. I don't think there is any benefit in this for the consumer.
None whatsoever, but a boon for dealers and other mechanics.
 
I bought some new fluid for the auto transmission in my 2014 Passat. I googled the method for replacement. Pain in the tush. My theory is the reason for deleting the dipstick is twofold: 1. saves the cost of manufacturing and installing the dipstick & tube. 2. Easier to transport with no escape route for the ATF. I don't think there is any benefit in this for the consumer.
Yeah, there is a benefit to consumer. Stop first VW owner you see and ask them do they know what ATF goes in?
Owners who know exactly what fluid goes in:
a. Know good indy or will take it to the dealership.
b. Can DIY.
 
The factory service manual for my Nissan Versa says you have to fill the transmission from the bottom and check the level at a specified temperature. It doesn't mention it's got a dipstick tube that has a locking cap on it but no dipstick. I recently changed the CVT fluid/filters in it. I did it at ambient temperature. I popped the locking cap off from underneath the car by putting a screwdriver in the locking device and hitting it with hammer. I removed the cartridge filter and replaced it then removed the pan to change the pan filter and clean the magnets in the pan. I caught and measured the fluid that came out and filled it from the top with the same amount of fluid at ambient temperature. Your VW may be different but I'd do some investigating to see if it has a dipstick tube.
 
It's not really a PITA.

Drain and refill. Make sure fluid is at correct temperature range for proper level (with appropriate scan tool)

It self levels with the level/fill tube.
1. Requires special tool to refill (I have one). 2. When you refill there is some uncertainty because of the fluid in the hose that doesn't go in the transmission (hose is in a U shape to refill. 3. If there was a dipstick I would drain with my extractor and refill through the tube...15 minute job, hands still clean.
 
The factory service manual for my Nissan Versa says you have to fill the transmission from the bottom and check the level at a specified temperature. It doesn't mention it's got a dipstick tube that has a locking cap on it but no dipstick. I recently changed the CVT fluid/filters in it. I did it at ambient temperature. I popped the locking cap off from underneath the car by putting a screwdriver in the locking device and hitting it with hammer. I removed the cartridge filter and replaced it then removed the pan to change the pan filter and clean the magnets in the pan. I caught and measured the fluid that came out and filled it from the top with the same amount of fluid at ambient temperature. Your VW may be different but I'd do some investigating to see if it has a dipstick tube.
No tube.
 
OK, I just thought it was worth mentioning that some manufacturers still have them but don't make mention of it. I think a lot of this is just a way to intimidate owners into bringing their car back to the dealer for service. Good luck.

The tube on my Versa is almost impossible to see without removing the coolant overflow bottle.
 
Yeah, there is a benefit to consumer. Stop first VW owner you see and ask them do they know what ATF goes in?
Owners who know exactly what fluid goes in:
a. Know good indy or will take it to the dealership.
b. Can DIY.

and even more, simply won't touch it forever.
 
I have no Transmission Dip-Stick.
Watching You-Tube videos of my engine, I see where to drain and refill.
When the time comes to do a drain & fill, I will:
1) Make sure old and new fluids are the same temperature (let sit together over night).
2) Measure what I take out and put that much back in.

Removing the Pan may be DIY or Mechanic.
 
Sealed transmissions, which aren't sealed, are stupid. That's my 2 cents.
And if they want the fluid checked at a certain temp, put it on a dash readout.
Remember when tranny dipsticks were marked with a cold and hot level??? Too easy. I still think the reason the manufacturers don't use dipsticks is because of ease of transport and savings in manufacturing and installing the tube and dipstick (When they receive the tranny from the manufacturer it's ready to go). Nothing to do with anything else.
 
1. Requires special tool to refill (I have one). 2. When you refill there is some uncertainty because of the fluid in the hose that doesn't go in the transmission (hose is in a U shape to refill. 3. If there was a dipstick I would drain with my extractor and refill through the tube...15 minute job, hands still clean.
Try using a pressure bleeder and connect the pressure bleeder and fill tube adapter with a hose. Then you don't have to worry about the limitation of gravity feeding.
 
Remember when tranny dipsticks were marked with a cold and hot level??? Too easy. I still think the reason the manufacturers don't use dipsticks is because of ease of transport and savings in manufacturing and installing the tube and dipstick (When they receive the tranny from the manufacturer it's ready to go). Nothing to do with anything else.
I service a friends '15 Altima strippie with the CVT. I got a dipstick off a previous year model, also with the CVT. Works great.
 
As I've mentioned several times, assembly wants to avoid all the fluid fills on the main line that they can, because they are messy and prone to problems. Having a transmission assembly pre-filled is a plus, and at least at GM they use quick connects that plug into the vehicle cooling system with enough fluid extra in the trans to compensate. Is this a good thing for the maintenance savvy user, no it's not. But that dipstick is never coming back.
 
I bought some new fluid for the auto transmission in my 2014 Passat. I googled the method for replacement. Pain in the tush. My theory is the reason for deleting the dipstick is twofold: 1. saves the cost of manufacturing and installing the dipstick & tube. 2. Easier to transport with no escape route for the ATF. I don't think there is any benefit in this for the consumer.
IMO it was done in order to reduce the amount of petroleum waste. Or course the units are engineered to last for well over 100k miles on factory fill. Sealed units have been used for over 20 years. Fluid related failures within 100k miles are rare.
 
I just this morning drained the old fluid and replaced it with new fluid. I weighed the old fluid in an old 5 Qt. motor oil container and replaced with 30 grams more than the old to compensate for fluid that remained in the drain pan and old 5 qt. container. The car (2014 Passat Wolfsburg) has only 51K miles on it and the fluid was black. I guess this will became an annual ritual for me. The method shown in the UTube video is to use a special adapter on the drain plug to pump in the new fluid. There is a TORX 55 plug on the transmission that can be used as a fill hole. VW claims this is some sort of a vent, but they lie. That makes a gravity feed with an old piece of clear tubing and a funnel easy and you don't need the drain plug adapter.
 
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