schaeffer oil

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quote:
Originally posted by Airborne Ranger: Is schaeffer or whatever how you spell it, is that stuff ash based or paraffin???
According to the MSDS, their blend is made from a mixture of old cigar ashes and discarded candles, so I guess it's both ash and paraffin based. [stretch]
 

oilpan49

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hmmmmmm I'm not real fond of paraffin based oils, but I see alot of ppl on here like to use it and say they have great results??? Also seems like alot of ppl here on there like Mobil1, maybe I should pick some up. Tks guys [Big Grin] [Dual] AR
 
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Which Schaeffer oil are you referring to? The 7000series...the one that gets the most attention here is a synthetic blend (30%group IV PAO with group II petroleum basestock). I assume you're not confusing paraffin basestock with wax...it doesn't contain any. They have a full dino oil that is all group II. They also have a full synthetic PAO oil as well. All three share a high quality anti-wear additive package so all should give excellent engine protection. The blend and the full PAO would be more suited to longer drains and higher performance/high shear engine conditions. I'm currently looking into the all PAO oil for my turbo car that tends to shear oils down in viscosity. [ December 01, 2002, 01:22 AM: Message edited by: mormit ]
 

driven2services

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Depending on the part of the world the oil well is located in, crude oil will be paraffinic base or asphaltic base, or a combination of the two. http://www.state.ar.us/agc/petroleu.htm Paraffinic based crude oils make the best lube oil. All the wax is removed during the refining process (either totally removed or totally converted to other products). http://www.boucherandjones.com/hydrocracking.htm I don't know what crude oils were used to produce the base oils for Schaeffer or anybody else, and it doesn't matter to me. The refining and blending process results in very good oils from all brands. Schaeffer is one of the best of the best. Ken
 

oilpan49

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I read that oils that contain paraffin in them can gunk up engines if not kept clean enough. Oils such as Pennzoil I know contains paraffin but it's not like the wax paraffin!!!???? Neat trick I learned is what is going on inside your engine with a paraffin based oil is this. Take an ordinary piece of string and dip it into hot candle wax, keep doing that over and over and look at the string everytime you dip into the wax. I've done that before and about after 4 or 5 times it got pretty thick on there. Mormit, you say paraffin based oils don't have wax in them, if not then wax, then what!? Yes I am talking about the 7000series. Also, I was told by an engineer I met at a family gathering here recently, that synthetic oil is not really synthetic oil, it is still dino oil but a more higher quality, what gives???? There is alot of questions in the world of oil [Bang Head] LOL Tks again guys [Dual] AR
 
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8,937
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quote:
Originally posted by Airborne Ranger: I read that oils that contain paraffin in them can gunk up engines if not kept clean enough. Oils such as Pennzoil I know contains paraffin but it's not like the wax paraffin!!!????
Bingo! Don't confuse "paraffin" with "wax;" they are not the same thing when it comes to motor oil. In the research I've done, I've never run across a motor oil that was not "paraffin based." Fully saturated parraffin molecules (which is essentially what synthetic PAO is) is the ideal base for a motor oil.
 
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Airborne, I think you are making the same mistake I used to. There is a world of difference between a high quality "paraffin base stock" and a low quality oil which has a lot of free floating paraffins (wax) in it. Any of the newer oils like SJ or SL (Group II or II+) could not have free-floating paraffins in it. They would never pass the SAE tests. I know Quaker State and perhaps Pennzoil had a terrible reputation of gunking up motors with a waxy-like substance ... but that was decades ago and both current oils bear no similarities to those ancient formulations. Other folks on this board more familiar with petroleum chemsitry can correct me where I may have strayed. [Wink] --- Bror Jace
 

driven2services

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Ranger-- Forget about wax, paraffin, hand-dipped candles, and all the rest of that stuff. None of it applies to motor oil today nor in the past. The small amount of wax remaining in oil is completely controlled by an additive in the finished oil called a pour point depresant; in any case, it's only a concern at very cold temperatures. Forty years ago I heard about Pennzoil causing engine sludge, and I couldn't find any actual cases of this sludge then, either. Read the link I posted above about Petro-Canada base oils. The info here applies to most base oils. An additive package is then blended into the base stock to make the finished lubricant. Here's more info: http://www.lubrizol.com/LubeTheory/base.htm http://www.lubrizol.com/LubeTheory/prop.htm (Note that that the additives discussed here are the additive package added by the oil company, NOT some snake oil you mix in yourself.) Yes, some so-called full synthetic motor oils are very highly refined petroleum. They're made from material called Group III base oil. They do a good job, but true synthetic oils made from Group IV and Group V base stocks are better. Ken [ December 01, 2002, 08:14 PM: Message edited by: Ken ]
 

Al

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Airborne: Just stick with us here and if you are interested you'll get your questions answered. You will find that lots of things you heard (from "Engineers" or "Mechanics") may be wrong. And yea-forget the wax thing. And as was mentioned "True Syns" (Mobil1, Redline, Amsoil,Shaeffers Moly Pure Syn) are different then "pretend syns" (Castrol Syntech). Just as important are the addivive packages.
 

oilpan49

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Tks guys, I really want to make my ranger last and get the most from it. Now that the paraffin battle is settled [Big Grin] My 93 Ranger is due for an oil change, it's got 79Kmiles on it and was wondering would it be too late to switch to synthetic. I know the previous before me took good care of it and didn't use synthetic oil. Is it too late to make the switch or just stick with something like schaeffer dino oil 10w30????? Tks again guys, [Happy] [Coffee] AR
 

Patman

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Guelph, Ontario
quote:
Originally posted by Airborne Ranger: Also, I was told by an engineer I met at a family gathering here recently, that synthetic oil is not really synthetic oil, it is still dino oil but a more higher quality, what gives????
That would be oils made with a group 3 base oil. They are allowed to be called synthetic, but technically speaking they are hydrocracked petroleum oil. Oils that fall under this category are oils such as Castrol Syntec, Valvoline Synpower, Pennzoil with Pennzane, and many many more. As a matter of fact, Mobil 1 really is the only true synthetic (which uses a PAO/ester base oil, not group 3) that you can find everywhere. Redline, Amsoil and Royal Purple are true synthetics, as well as a few others, but they are harder to find, you won't see them at Walmart/Kmart. Schaeffer also makes a full synthetic, but it's not talked about very often since their blended oil performs so well. Their blend is about 30% PAO/70% group 2+ and has proven itself to be able to handle 10k intervals in a lot of cases. This blend is far superior to any group 3 based so called synthetic. [ December 02, 2002, 09:34 AM: Message edited by: Patman ]
 
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quote:
Originally posted by Patman: [QUOTE]That would be oils made with a group 3 base oil. They are allowed to be called synthetic, but technically speaking they are hydrocracked petroleum oil. ... Schaeffer also makes a full synthetic, but it's not talked about very often since their blended oil performs so well. Their blend is about 30% PAO/70% group 2+ and has proven itself to be able to handle 10k intervals in a lot of cases. This blend is far superior to any group 3 based so called synthetic.
Patman, a couple of points. First, hydrocracking alone won't produce a Group III base oil. Group III's are produced by either hydrocracking/hydroisomerization/hydrofinishing (Chevron UCBO, Pennzoil PureBase, Petro-Canada HT) or hydroisomerization/hydrofinishing (Shell's XHVI). The feedstock for the former is the distilled VGO. The feedstock for the latter is slack wax. Second, unless someone has tested all the Group III synthetics against Schaeffer's blend, your statement that the blend is superior is merely an opinion. [Wink] [ December 02, 2002, 10:45 AM: Message edited by: XHVI ]
 

MolaKule

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XHVI, Are you speaking in terms of your formulated oils or base oils? The fake synthetic (Group III) base oils have no advantages over either PAO's or esters, that's chemical and testing reality.
 
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