S&W M&P 2.0 10mm

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Complex subject - depends on the threat, really.

There are other factors to be considered: magazine capacity, recoil, follow-up shots, shooter experience, etc.

For self-defense against a threat that is under the influence of drugs? Wearing winter clothing? Large in size? 10mm has some performance advantages.

I am a fan of the 10mm. But in my case, the disadvantages of recoil and follow up are mitigated by experience and training. Magazine capacity limitations are mitigated by the capacity of the Glock 20. But the G20 is a big gun, hard to conceal, not appropriate for many situations...
thanks,
 
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IMHO, 10mm isn't a very wise choice.
- it's too expensive to shoot in volume
- hard to manage recoil for accurate multiple rapid shots
- semi autos are not great in real wilderness as a malfunction requiring racking slide or mag change can be too slow to save life, a .44 Magnum double action revolver would be a better choice.
 
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IMHO, 10mm isn't a very wise choice.
- it's too expensive to shoot in volume - BUT you recommend .44Mag (?)
- hard to manage recoil for accurate multiple rapid shots- BUT you recommend .44Mag (?)
- semi autos are not great in real wilderness as a malfunction requiring racking slide or mag change can be too slow to save life, a .44 Magnum double action revolver would be a better choice. OK, a revolver with 5 or 6 shots, may be slightly more reliable, but a semi-auto can be darn near close in reliability. Plus, mag change? Really? Vs. 6 shots? Hmmm.......
See above.

I shoot 10mm all the time. Even now, you can find 10mm and it's about the same as 45ACP (which irritates me) - but I load 10mm myself, which I do 44Mag as well. Ether way I don't exactly see where you are coming from when you recommend 44Mag. 10mm recoil is just not near as nasty as people make it out to be. Even hot loads. Commercial 10mm is baby kittens.

Unless I'm running some homemade gun and swapping springs and things, I never have stoppages ESPECIALLY in 10mm. A good semi-auto can go to real wilderness for months and be just fine.
 
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- I never said to shoot .44Mag in volume, just that 10mm is not cheap to shoot to compare with say 9mm. That's if one shoots in volume for training or fun or both, say 300rds a session couple times a month or more.
- same here, 9mm would be easier to control
- if a primer fails in semi you would need to rack slide, if mag fails/ double feed, you need to clear the gun. With a revolver you just pull trigger again that's it in case primer fails. I'm not a revolver guy either thou had one a while back.
I'm just expressing my opinions and not looking for a fight.
 
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IMHO, 10mm isn't a very wise choice.
- it's too expensive to shoot in volume
- hard to manage recoil for accurate multiple rapid shots
- semi autos are not great in real wilderness as a malfunction requiring racking slide or mag change can be too slow to save life, a .44 Magnum double action revolver would be a better choice.

I don't think the recoil is difficult. I make follow-up shots just fine with the Glock 20.

6 shots isn't enough sometimes. I know of a guy who emptied a 15 round magazine into a bear and the last shot killed it. If he had only 6 shots he'd be bear poo right now.

And a 44 magnum revolver is just too heavy for my liking for carrying around.

The cops in Greenland carry Glock 20's and dispatch polar bears from time to time with no trouble.

My G20 also has never had any kind of FTF, FTE, jam, or anything. It goes bang every time. Granted I only have 500 or so rounds through it, but I have no reason to worry about it. I've got a Glock 19 with thousands of trouble free rounds through it, as well as a G43. None of them have ever had 1 issue. Not one. And most ammo through the 19 and 43 has been cheap bulk ammo. In bear country, I run Underwood ammo with nickel plated cases. If the tradeoff of some extraordinarily rare hiccup is to have 16 rounds on tap, then I'll take those odds any day.

And its no fight. Just fun gun talk and choices that are all valid on both sides. We're all friends here! Lol!
 
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Full house 10mm doesn't give up as much to the magnum revolver cartridges as people think and the improved shoot-ability is significant. The original 10mm loading was from Norma and sent a .40 caliber 200 grain truncated cone FMJ bullet at 1200 fps. In terms of penetration, that load could be measured in feet instead of inches and really was comparable with .41 mag. You can approximate that load with hand loads or with ones like from Buffalo Bore ammo and others.
 
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IMHO, 10mm isn't a very wise choice.
- it's too expensive to shoot in volume
- hard to manage recoil for accurate multiple rapid shots
- semi autos are not great in real wilderness as a malfunction requiring racking slide or mag change can be too slow to save life, a .44 Magnum double action revolver would be a better choice.
I’m a bit new to firearms but I trust revolvers way more than semi autos. You can see what’s happening and a jam isn’t really a thing. I can shoot 200 rounds and 1 jam or misfire makes me lose confidence. I always am thinking about it.
 
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I’m a bit new to firearms but I trust revolvers way more than semi autos. You can see what’s happening and a jam isn’t really a thing. I can shoot 200 rounds and 1 jam or misfire makes me lose confidence. I always am thinking about it.
If asked, most people would say that revolvers are more reliable than autoloaders, but revolvers aren’t 100% reliable, especially when operated by an inexperienced shooter.

And a revolver mechanism malfunction can be more difficult to clear than an autopistol jam.

For example, about 10 years ago, my brother-in-law took an interest in guns, and bought himself a Smith & Wesson .38 Special revolver as his first gun. On his first trip to the range with it, he jammed it up. I wasn’t there, but, from his description, it sounded like he might have gotten it out of time by pulling the trigger in double action mode, but failing to follow through and complete the stroke of the trigger. The range officer had to clear it for him.

Admittedly, he didn’t play with cap guns or toy guns or anything growing up, didn’t have his dad or grandpa take him to the range and teach him to shoot. But it really shook his confidence in that revolver, even though there’s nothing wrong with the gun.

I think most autoloader jams also come down to shooter error; limp-wristing, dirty, unmaintained gun, not sufficiently testing the ammo you’re running, etc.
 

ZeeOSix

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I've had malfunctions in many semi-auto firearms that were maintained and operated correctly ... and zero in any revolver using center fired ammo I've ever owned. Only "malfunction" I've ever had in any revolver is if it was rimfire ammo (ie, .22LR) and the ammo failed to fire due to crappy ammo.
 
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