Rust on my single six hammer

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What about the “discolored” Kimber... Keeping guns in their boxes and bags is about the worst thing you can do for one. Blued or bare carbon steel surfaces require maintenance and proper storage...
 

AMC

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That amount of rust looks fairly normal/common to me, especially on a Ruger. Ruger uses castings to make their parts and cast parts tend to rust easily. To remove the rust, use 000 or 0000 steel wool wetted with a good gun oil or CLP type product. Buff it out, wipe it all clean and re-oil heavily. Rust and wear issues around the forcing cone of a single action revolver is a very common complaint with all brands, including Ruger. The problem is that the forcing cone sees the most carbon, metal fouling and heat, but since the cylinder doesn't swing out easily like it does on a double action revolver, most people never clean the forcing cone. Because of this, you get mixture of carbon, lead, brass and who knows what else caked on the forcing cone. Mix even a tiny bit of moisture in there and viola, rust..... To prevent further rust issues, always clean the forcing cone well and use a product that is known to be a very good rust preventer. Most who know me, know I use and recommend Corrosion-X. It is an equally impressive lubricant and rust preventative that basically makes metal rust proof when it is treated with it. I will go out on a limb and guess you weren't wiping that gun down with Corrosion-X, were you? wink Especially on a revolver, corrosion protection is much more important than lubrication and EP/AW properties of your gun oil. A revolver does not need any type of extreme performance lubricant. They just do not create enough friction, heat or wear to need it. I would not let something like this get you down or ruin your opinion of Ruger firearms. It is a fairly common, live and learn type of thing.
 

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While not trying to hi jack this thread, I completely disagree with those results, especially the lubrication results he got. Corrosion-X and Weaponshield are the best lubricants I have ever tested and he has them as dead last.... Yeah Right! Barricade is also one of the worst lubricants I have ever tested and he found it to be the best???? On what planet? His corrosion prevention results seem closer to the results I have gotten but still pretty far off. I have never seen boeshield or breakfree do so poorly. I have never seen Tuff-Glide or Hoppes do quite that well either.....
 

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Originally Posted By: DuckRyder
What about the “discolored” Kimber... Keeping guns in their boxes and bags is about the worst thing you can do for one. Blued or bare carbon steel surfaces require maintenance and proper storage...
Not sure what you're getting at. Am I lying or something? Discoloration of stainless steel with no particular surface roughness is different notionally than a red rust bloom on blued steel. And for the second time, the mention of keeping in a bag is from 2013.
 
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Originally Posted By: AMC
While not trying to hi jack this thread, I completely disagree with those results, especially the lubrication results he got. Corrosion-X and Weaponshield are the best lubricants I have ever tested and he has them as dead last.... Yeah Right! Barricade is also one of the worst lubricants I have ever tested and he found it to be the best???? On what planet? His corrosion prevention results seem closer to the results I have gotten but still pretty far off. I have never seen boeshield or breakfree do so poorly. I have never seen Tuff-Glide or Hoppes do quite that well either.....
Disagree with the results? Are you saying he somehow changed a variable in a plot against Corrosion X? Either way, since you say you've tested them, post your data so that we could compare.
 
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The main thing in regards to rust prevention on firearms, is maintaining a low enough relative humidity in the home so that rust cannot form. This has to be managed carefully, even in desert climates. Where low outdoor humidity is all but guaranteed most of the year. A lot of people here in Arizona have evaporative cooling. Swamp coolers are probably responsible for more rusted guns out here than anything else. You should not run them when the dew point is above 55F. Yet many people do, and the result is extremely high indoor relative humidity, that can all but guarantee the formation of rust. Especially in poorly ventilated areas like closets and such, where many people store guns. If you live in the South or Midwest where humidity is most always high, purchasing a good dehumidifier can really help in preventing the formation of rust on guns. I have several humidity gauges throughout my house, as well as in my gun safes. That way I know at a glance what the moisture content of the air inside my home is at all times. It also helps to keep gun safe doors open a few hours a day when you are home, to allow for better ventilation. Another thing is, it's not so much what type of oil you use, but rather how much and how often you apply it. A guy who uses plain motor oil, but applies it every month or so, is going to have better rust protection than someone who hardly ever keeps a close eye on his weapons, but uses some highly touted rust prevention oil, that scores well when sprayed with salt water during a thunderstorm, and is then buried in the backyard for 6 months.
 
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My usual treatment for small rust spots is to oil the spot up well, let it sit for a day or two, and then polish the area with bronze wool. I much prefer bronze wool to steel wool for this application as its less likely to impact any surrounding finish. Some 4/0 steel wool can be used, though. You DO have to be careful of using steel wool on stainless steel parts, though-fine steel wool can get in the "pores" of the SS and rust.
 
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Originally Posted By: JHZR2
Originally Posted By: DuckRyder
What about the “discolored” Kimber... Keeping guns in their boxes and bags is about the worst thing you can do for one. Blued or bare carbon steel surfaces require maintenance and proper storage...
Not sure what you’re getting at.
What I am getting at is that the Kimber barrel is not stainless (at least not unless you stated the wrong model or they did not follow their own specifications on yours.) and it isn’t “discolored” it is rusted... The plug is likely also rusted and it may or may not be stainless, it isn’t unheard of for stainless firearms to have coated parts that aren’t stainless. Even if it is stainless most stainless used in firearms is not rust proof but simply resists rust better than blued carbon steel or carbon steel in the white.
Originally Posted By: JHZR2
Am I lying or something?
You should know from your prior experience with me that if that was what I was getting at, I would have just said you were lying. I’ve done it before and I have no problem doing it again should I find it to be the case.
Originally Posted By: JHZR2
Discoloration of stainless steel with no particular surface roughness is different notionally than a red rust bloom on blued steel.
Well, I guess in the same way a pregnant girl not showing is diffrent notionally from one that is showing it might be, both girls are still pregnant and both guns are still rusted. So yeah since the difference “exist only in theory” I guess “notionally” different is exactly what it is.
Originally Posted By: JHZR2
And for the second time, the mention of keeping in a bag is from 2013.
You’ve got an issue with the way you store and maintain the guns, not the guns.
 
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The most usual cause of rusting is lack of maintenance but in your case prob not.....you're very thorough from what I've read of your threads. Hammers get the least amount of care...a quick wipe with a cloth and then usually thumbed down and all that human oil is all over the hammer.....clean it up completely and keep it oiled. The chamber/barrel is showing corrosion....was it fired with black/pyroxex? Wet? I would not keep firearms in plastic and I prop revolvers with shotshells/dowels to keep most of the steel on the carpet. Do you use a desiccant? I have four in my 60" and regularly recharge them. Safes are usually in a basement and/or garage which MAY cause problems. If you have electric in your safe, a 60 watt bulb will keep it nice, warm, and dry. The hammer rust, no doubt, is from thumbs.
 
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JHZR2

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Originally Posted By: DuckRyder
Originally Posted By: JHZR2
Originally Posted By: DuckRyder
What about the “discolored” Kimber... Keeping guns in their boxes and bags is about the worst thing you can do for one. Blued or bare carbon steel surfaces require maintenance and proper storage...
Not sure what you’re getting at.
What I am getting at is that the Kimber barrel is not stainless (at least not unless you stated the wrong model or they did not follow their own specifications on yours.) and it isn’t “discolored” it is rusted... The plug is likely also rusted and it may or may not be stainless, it isn’t unheard of for stainless firearms to have coated parts that aren’t stainless. Even if it is stainless most stainless used in firearms is not rust proof but simply resists rust better than blued carbon steel or carbon steel in the white.
Originally Posted By: JHZR2
Am I lying or something?
You should know from your prior experience with me that if that was what I was getting at, I would have just said you were lying. I’ve done it before and I have no problem doing it again should I find it to be the case.
Originally Posted By: JHZR2
Discoloration of stainless steel with no particular surface roughness is different notionally than a red rust bloom on blued steel.
Well, I guess in the same way a pregnant girl not showing is diffrent notionally from one that is showing it might be, both girls are still pregnant and both guns are still rusted. So yeah since the difference “exist only in theory” I guess “notionally” different is exactly what it is.
Originally Posted By: JHZR2
And for the second time, the mention of keeping in a bag is from 2013.
You’ve got an issue with the way you store and maintain the guns, not the guns.
There are differences between discoloration and rust. Rust generally implies red iron oxide, while it is only one form of oxidation and one possible cause of a color shift. Example: https://www.surgicalinstruments.com/resources/rust-versus-stain Red oxide rust blooms, which can be seen on the forcing cone of the ruger, are fundamentally different than the non-pitted, non-raised/bloomed color shifted spots on the Kimber and Ruger's hammer. The causes may or may not be the same. Given that I have multiple other blued/steel guns in the same storage location under the same conditions that don't exhibit such things means that it is not readily clear that every situation is due to the same thing. Im not saying I'm free of guilt. But the guns are oiled and kept well (out of bags), and this is the only gun where red rust blooms have formed.
 

JHZR2

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Originally Posted By: AMC
That amount of rust looks fairly normal/common to me, especially on a Ruger. Ruger uses castings to make their parts and cast parts tend to rust easily. To remove the rust, use 000 or 0000 steel wool wetted with a good gun oil or CLP type product. Buff it out, wipe it all clean and re-oil heavily. Rust and wear issues around the forcing cone of a single action revolver is a very common complaint with all brands, including Ruger. The problem is that the forcing cone sees the most carbon, metal fouling and heat, but since the cylinder doesn't swing out easily like it does on a double action revolver, most people never clean the forcing cone. Because of this, you get mixture of carbon, lead, brass and who knows what else caked on the forcing cone. Mix even a tiny bit of moisture in there and viola, rust..... To prevent further rust issues, always clean the forcing cone well and use a product that is known to be a very good rust preventer. Most who know me, know I use and recommend Corrosion-X. It is an equally impressive lubricant and rust preventative that basically makes metal rust proof when it is treated with it. I will go out on a limb and guess you weren't wiping that gun down with Corrosion-X, were you? wink Especially on a revolver, corrosion protection is much more important than lubrication and EP/AW properties of your gun oil. A revolver does not need any type of extreme performance lubricant. They just do not create enough friction, heat or wear to need it. I would not let something like this get you down or ruin your opinion of Ruger firearms. It is a fairly common, live and learn type of thing.
. Thank you for a good reply!
 
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Originally Posted By: AMC
That amount of rust looks fairly normal/common to me, especially on a Ruger. Ruger uses castings to make their parts and cast parts tend to rust easily. I would not let something like this get you down or ruin your opinion of Ruger firearms. It is a fairly common,....
There is nothing "normal" or "common" about rust on Ruger firearms. I own literally dozens of them, and there isn't a speck of rust on ANY of them. Some date back to when they were purchased new in 1973. When I lived in the "Rust Belt", (Chicago), until 1991. If conditions exist that will cause rust on a Ruger weapon, rust can and will occur on any other make as well. The investment casting process has nothing to do with it.
 
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I remember seeing a lot of complaints about the LC9, LCP and SR1911 rugerforum. One guy posted a pic of his LCP after something like 14 days and it was covered. "never had any issue with any of his other guns." Personally, I've got two Ruger revolvers and an LCP and haven't had an issue. But I use Froglube on them. laugh
 
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JHZR2

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Originally Posted By: billt460
Originally Posted By: AMC
That amount of rust looks fairly normal/common to me, especially on a Ruger. Ruger uses castings to make their parts and cast parts tend to rust easily. I would not let something like this get you down or ruin your opinion of Ruger firearms. It is a fairly common,....
There is nothing "normal" or "common" about rust on Ruger firearms. I own literally dozens of them, and there isn't a speck of rust on ANY of them. Some date back to when they were purchased new in 1973. When I lived in the "Rust Belt", (Chicago), until 1991. If conditions exist that will cause rust on a Ruger weapon, rust can and will occur on any other make as well. The investment casting process has nothing to do with it.
I know your style of posting is very absolute, but its just not the case here. All guns are stored the same way, only this one shows red iron oxide blooming. I do not concur that the discoloration on the Kimber is necessarily the same thing. Just like extractor discoloration on HK USP guns is not rust/oxidation. The bloom of red oxide in the ruger forcing cone is unique in my collection.
 
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Just because guns are all stored the same way, does not mean they will all not rust, or will rust. The environment is simply one variable. The condition of the finish on the gun, the protection applied by the owner(oil or wax), and the condition of that protection in any spot also matter. It could simply be that the protection was lacking on that particular area of that particular gun, so corrosion occurred. And I am making a point to use the term corrosion here, not rust. I also agree that Rugers are not more prone to corrosion than another make simply due to their cast process.
 
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