recovery straps

Messages
97
Location
WI
My question is which method would be better when hooking up a recovery strap/s to a vehicle that's stuck in the ditch, mud, or snow. My question isn't the hook up to the pull vehicle, but on the vehicle that's being recovered. Hook up #1: use one strap and use a recovery point on the vehicle that's being pulled out. Hook up #2: use 2 straps. The first strap would be used on 2 recovery points and joined at the front to form a Y shape. The second strap would get joined to the first one, and that would be connected to the pull vehicle. I'm thinking this method would be better because it would distribute the weight more properly. The force is taking place on 2 sides instead of just 1 like the first method. Thoughts?
 
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35,981
Location
ME
The 2nd would be better but realistically you're lucky digging around under the bumper etc to find just one tow hook. Unless you have a jeep with 'em built into the bumpers, but then, how would you get stuck? The good samaritan towing you out would start losing patience if you're hooking up something complicated, so it would be better to have it all set up, standing on the shoulder with the hook ready for his vehicle.
 
Messages
4,434
Location
Massachusetts
I practice recovery in some form almost everytime I go out wheeling. Use method one. Recovery straps are not designed for forces like method two. A strap is designed to stretch as the recovering vehicle pulls, and then contracts, yanking the stuck vehicle out. You will need a slight running start for a good pull, anywhere from 3-6 feet. Also, do NOT use straps with hooks or attach a strap to a hitch ball! These can end up being 1 or 2 pound projectiles!
 
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4,426
Location
Southeast
My experience with a lot of snowbelt rescues... 1. straps are nice in that they have some give and don't give as much whiplash. (talking about your average AAP strap with hooks on both ends). 2. however, they snap almost every time you get slack and then have to "catch" the towing vehicle as the line goes taut. 3. otoh, steel cables last and last, but don't have a safety factor of snapping before something important on the car. Good to use only after you've used straps for a while. 4. I've never used fancy rigging like #2. #2 could make a good slingshot as first strap will have less force than second; 2nd snaps and the elasticity of #1 launches #2 through a windshield. BOTH ENDS must be secure in the event of snap. M
 
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Messages
4,434
Location
Massachusetts
 Originally Posted By: simple
Zaedock, I appreciate your input. I really do. Listen, I'm not saying you're wrong, but how would you describe the link below then? He's using method 2. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oISdDPliZSA
The video is correct. However, the 1st strap is a bridle (similar to a tree saver) and is not designed to stretch. I still do not recommend that method because 95% of off roaders do not have these types of specialty straps and will use "snatch" straps thinking that's what it is. If you have a bridle, then you're fine for method 2. I hope you understand why I didn't recommend it.
 Originally Posted By: meep
1. straps are nice in that they have some give and don't give as much whiplash. (talking about your average AAP strap with hooks on both ends).
NEVER use straps with hooks! They should be banned!
 Originally Posted By: meep
2. however, they snap almost every time you get slack and then have to "catch" the towing vehicle as the line goes taut.
Real snatch straps are designed to stretch and recover the towed vehicle with recoil. There are also some nice ropes out there too, that really stretch, literally yanking the vehicle out! If your strap snaps every time, stop buying Walmart straps and get a quality unit from Warn or Pro Comp. It will be the best money you ever spent.
 Originally Posted By: meep
3. otoh, steel cables last and last, but don't have a safety factor of snapping before something important on the car. Good to use only after you've used straps for a while.
While some people may use chains or cables, I cannot recommend these for safe recovery. There is no give, place stress on vehicles and mounting points, can be terrible projectiles, and need to be very heavy gauge when compared to a 30,000 lb strap.
 
Messages
3,130
Location
Phila,PA
With my jeep and f250, offroading was a weekly thing. To pull someone out I would use my tow hooks on the jeep, or tow points on the truck. I would put the strap on to the tow points or hooks on the other car. Worked every time. Now one time in my jeep I was stuck in a 3 foot mud pond. The only way for a truck to get to me was at the rear. And there was no point back there for the tow strap. So I had to wrap the strap around the rear axle. NOT FUN IN 3 FEET OF MUD!!! I was scared, but I had to get the jeep out. It worked GREAT. Nothing broke and I drove that jeep for another 20,000 miles before trading it in.
 

simple

Thread starter
Messages
97
Location
WI
 Originally Posted By: Zaedock
[quote=simple]Zaedock, I appreciate your input. I really do. Listen, I'm not saying you're wrong, but how would you describe the link below then? He's using method 2. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oISdDPliZSA
The video is correct. However, the 1st strap is a bridle (similar to a tree saver) and is not designed to stretch. I still do not recommend that method because 95% of off roaders do not have these types of specialty straps and will use "snatch" straps thinking that's what it is. If you have a bridle, then you're fine for method 2. I hope you understand why I didn't recommend it. AH, I see where you're coming from now. I didn't know a bridle wasn't designed to stretch.
 
Call a wrecker. I have seen to many "do gooders" create way more damage than you could imagine. theirs ALOT of physics in a proper recovery that most people will never understand. LEAVE IT TO THE PRO's
 
Messages
1,389
Location
Nebraska
Having pulled out many small cars/trucks and two articulated single-axle trucks with my F250SD, I always go for one chain/strap hooked up to the best point on the towee. Yank only when absolutely required and the hookup point won't go flying. I have an assortment of clevis' and hooks, as well as chain, polypropolene w/hook at each end, and a couple of straps. The poly w/hooks has been invaluable for pulling stumps and bushes out of the ground, and I've used it on the smaller cars. I think they work pretty well, but the straps and chain come out for anything heavy.
 
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