recommendation for extremely steep, wet conditions

JHZR2

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Tire is 225/75R15, vehicle is 05 Ford Escape FWD. Application is one with extremely steep hills, including extremely steep hills on curves, and a good deal of rain. In this application (tropical), many cars use snow tires, I assume because the softer compound helps provide additional traction. Traction to accelerate up these hills and stop properly coming down is paramount. "High speed" driving is 35-45 MPH, and "long distance" is 8-10 miles. Recommendations? Thanks!
 
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225/75 Those are your options; if you don't need off road traction, the Kumho KR21 is a good tire. Some of the more all terrain tires have bigger, deeper lugs with less siping. I'd think you'd want a tread with more siping and a tread pattern that evacuates rain from the tread, which the KR21 does.
 
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JHZR2

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The terrain is severe, it is rough and tires dont last long at all. Hondas kill their ATs in less than 40k (personal experience). But it is mostly all concrete or asphalt, but "regular" tires often do poorly. What is rated good for the rain and wet on a highway may not do as well. Thus I think that lots of siping and soft compounds are key. People could care less about mileage rating, the tires are UV or other types of destroyed before the cars ever get to mileage.
 
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I have some used 2008 Hercules winter tires that I used all summer on the Tracker this year. Seemed to wear fine and were pretty good on wet pavement, very good on grass and dirt compared to my former all seasons with similar tread depth. They also have a normal passenger tire tread and sidewall plys(2)which might make them a bit tougher than a normal single ply snowtire sidewall. I see Hercules has a current light truck/SUV snow tire so maybe its a bit tougher than a Passenger rated snow tire.
 
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Tires by Web has a pretty decent selection of 225/75R15 tires. The idea of using a winter tire in a tropical climate because it supposedly gets better wet traction is a little scary to me - even if hydroplaning isn't an issue (and if 35 mph is 'fast', hydroplaning isn't an issue) you're still giving up a lot of tread stability for little to no gain in wet grip. Probably 35 years ago when snow tires were the only thing you could buy that had deep lugs and siping, people started using them because they worked. A modern all-terrain tire should be a much better option...
 
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Originally Posted By: JHZR2
Tire is 225/75R15, vehicle is 05 Ford Escape FWD. Application is one with extremely steep hills, including extremely steep hills on curves, and a good deal of rain. In this application (tropical), many cars use snow tires, I assume because the softer compound helps provide additional traction. Traction to accelerate up these hills and stop properly coming down is paramount. "High speed" driving is 35-45 MPH, and "long distance" is 8-10 miles. Recommendations? Thanks!
any particular reason you arent mentioning the location?
 
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Pennsylbammyvania
Originally Posted By: Quattro Pete
Originally Posted By: UG_Passat
where in jersey do you live and travel that it's that severe?
I'm pretty sure he's not talking about Jersey. smile
crackmeup Yes, Bermuda, or V.I. maybe??
 
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Yeah. I want details about the location as well. I have heard that winter tires are used in a lot of places in the Caribbean because traction is paramount, while the speeds are low and no one cares about tire wear. I can somewhat see this, but I wonder if an all terrain tire might be a better choice. Also, more details about how the vehicle is used, how many miles it puts on in a year, stuff like that. Filling the picture in will help generate better answers!
 
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Greenville SC
Originally Posted By: CapriRacer
Also, more details about how the vehicle is used, how many miles it puts on in a year, stuff like that. Filling the picture in will help generate better answers!
aww ... don't confuse us with science and facts ... THANKS Capri for offering sound, well researched, and above all as accurate as practical information.
 

JHZR2

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Application is St. Thomas, USVI. Figure 5-10k/year is a lot of driving. No single trip will be more than 5 miles on average, but most all of it is either on very hot pavement or very wet/slick pavement. Vehicle is just driven around on the surface roads, most of which are asphalt. Some driveways are concrete with cuts made in it to help with traction. The major issue is the wet roads that are slick and very steep. Going up or stopping going down is the biggest safety concern.
 
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Originally Posted By: UG_Passat
where in jersey do you live and travel that it's that severe?
It's a tropical location. Although 'extremely steep hills on curves' describes the road through Eaglerock Park pretty well.
 
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Pennsylbammyvania
Originally Posted By: PeteTheFarmer
Originally Posted By: UG_Passat
where in jersey do you live and travel that it's that severe?
It's a tropical location. Although 'extremely steep hills on curves' describes the road through Eaglerock Park pretty well.
As well as the raods through South Mountain Reservation which brings one to Eagle Rock Park/Res. wink
 
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OK, 2 thoughts: The first is that summer tires designed to have good wet grip (as opposed to good treadwear) are probably going to have the most grip of any possible alternative. But those are expensive! I would think that in the size we are talking, that any all terrain tire would make a good choice. - again, there's the grip vs treadwear thing! And my brain is just going nuts over the business possibilities. - Siping. This is one of those situations where aftermarket siping would be absolutely perfect. Low speeds, wet grip issues, wear not an issue. At $10 a tire, you could make a killing! - Used tires! Buy a whole container full of used tires from mainland US and resell them - offer aftermarket siping to extend their life. Buy them for $5 and sell them for $20! It doesn't matter if they are wornout. A few snips of cross siping and you're good to go!
 

JHZR2

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Good stuff. Any recommendations for which of the AT tires are best? Can one buy a siping machine, or is it done by hand?
 
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Looking at Tire Rack, most all of the 'good' A/T tires are very highly rated for wet grip. There are three available in the size you were looking for - Firestone Destination A/T ($111), Kumho Road Venture SAT KL61 ($102), and General Grabber AT 2 ($93). There are a few others, too, but I'd stick with one of those three. Unless you're a competent surgeon, I wouldn't try siping by hand. I know that Discount Tire offers it (they tried to sell it to me on my Nokians), but I can't tell you anyplace in 'Jersey or St. Thomas that does it. I bet you wouldn't have to call more than five tire shops before you hit one that could do it for you.
 
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