Real World Testing

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[Titanium_Alloy August 06, 2004 04:10 AM “I'd like to share my personal experience with Redline Power Steering Fluid. .....” “Last year I did about 6 (or maybe 7) drain-refills of my PS system with Redline PS fluid to replace factory filled PSF. You can see results on Redline PS fluid posted in UOA section. Results weren't very good, but that's not the point of my story.” “I was doing drain-refills with a plastic suction gun which has rubber part (about 1/2" thick) attached to the piston end (the one which goes into the cylinder) so it seals the cylinder well for a better vacuum. All drain-fills took about 2 maybe 3 weeks. After the 3rd drain fill I noticed that piston has difficulties fitting into a cylinder. By the 5 drain-fill I couldn't get the piston into the cylinder at all because the rubber part on the piston had swollen significantly. I had to get a new thing to finish last couple drain-fills. Some might say that all PS might do it. But this isn't what I noticed. Afterwards I did a multiple drain-fills on other 3 cars with a new suction gun and swelling didn't happen. I used it with Honda PSF, regular (SuperTech) and synthetic (Mobil 1) Dexron III, as well as with Valvoline SynPower PSF. NONE of the products exhibited ANY swelling (not even slight one, and certainly not to a degree of Redline PSF). .....” This is an example of the kind of problems that sometimes develop twixt the lab and the real world. In this case a full consideration of the compatibility of the product would entail evaluation of every elastomer, gasket, hose, and seal in not only current production vehicles, but in older vehicles already in use, other equipment which might specify power steering fluid, ancillary equipment such as grease guns, suction guns, storage devices, and perhaps paints, adhesives, hoses, and other vehicle components with which the product might reasonably come in contact. Consideration would be given to compatibility with residual amounts of other power steering fluids present in existing vehicles or equipment, and topping off with products other than the product. The kinds of problems field test turn up is illustrated by Mazda’s restriction on the use of synthetic motor oils in their rotary engines. Mazda has been close-mouthed about exactly why the restriction was placed on, but rotary engines inject oil to lubricate the apex seals. Service technicians report that certain high flash point synthetics leave a hard residue which can become glass-like. Once this residue makes its way on and around critical seals and springs, the engine fails due to seal collapse or apex seal breakage. Upon disassembly, it is always evident that a synthetic oil was used by the contamination on the rotors and the severity of the damage. In fact, Mazda apparently could identify which brand was used based on an inspection after teardown.
 
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