Ravenol RSP vs REP vs DXG

03marin

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RUP is same .8 % SAPS as REP. I mentioned HTHS and it's specced by the manufacturer.
Just see the links below. RUP is virtually same formulation as REP except for slightly thicker
base oils. While REP is at the thicker end of 5W-30, RUP is at the thinner end of 5W-40.
Honestly, I doubt you'll notice the difference.
Both BMW LL-04, MB 229.51 and probably also Porsche C40 and VW 511 010 mandate
fuel savings requirements that can only be accomplished by using not too thick base oils.
Generally all MB 229.5/51 and BMW LL-04 approved PCMOs are fairly close in viscosity
whether they're 5W-30 or 0W/5W-40. A thinner 0/5W-30 at 9.5 cSt and 3.0 mPas wouldn't
meet the requirements, as well as a thicker 5W-40 at 15.7 cSt (100°C) and 4.5 mPas HTHS
very most likely wouldn't.






I seem to have got you wrong then. I have read that discussion you refer to some time ago.
I doubt batches do vary. Actually cheap consumer oil analysises do vary. You cannot assess
viscosities based on imprecise analysises. We use to see the same with Blackstone. If I do
remember correctly that discussion refered to a German forum where expertise is rare. The
only things worth reading on that forum are VOAs and UOAs, but you need to draw your
own conclusions from them.
That said, I don't think Ravenol are going the 'Made in Germany' route just like LM. Their
data sheets makes no mention of it. It's just on the bottle. I see lots of US made products
saying 'proudly made in America'. Nothing wrong with that. I almost only buy European and
American stuff anyway, in particular when it comes to cars. Bad enough my smartphone is
assembled in China. Wish it was made in Cupertino.
.
I appreciate the answers, and the explanations. I'm going to call Blauparts tomorrow and see if the REP is just "out of stock" like it says, or, if they are no longer carrying it.
 
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I've searched and read alot of different threads about these oils. Just trying to figure out which would be best for Turbo Direct Injection (Ford Fiesta ST 1.6). I'm looking for something that is D1G2, low saps, etc, etc. No long OCI's and the car is driven very hard, lots of track days. I don't care about cost either, that's menial.
It looks like Blauparts might not be carrying the REP any longer.

The other option I might consider is the Catrol Edge 0w40 from Wallyworld.....if it can hold up.

Any opinions or recommendations?

Thanks guys.
When was the last time you got a rebate on Ravenol? Currently Castrol has a rebate let Wallyworld be your friend!
 
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I'm assuming it was mechanical shear due to the UOA.
As Overkill noted, Blackstone is incapable of properly measuring fuel dilution with their indirect method. Mechanical shear is uncommon, especially with the fuel you are using and your driving it is far more likely to be dilution.

A change in brand will not help dilution if that is the root cause. Either correct the cause of the dilution (probably unlikely in this situation) or use an oil with a higher grade. Physics is physics, you're diluting the oil viscosity with a fluid with a very low viscosity.

Besides a UOA that actually measured dilution another way to check would to use a properly rated monograde oil and see if the viscosity still deviates. If it does then it's not mechanical shear.
 

03marin

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As Overkill noted, Blackstone is incapable of properly measuring fuel dilution with their indirect method. Mechanical shear is uncommon, especially with the fuel you are using and your driving it is far more likely to be dilution.

A change in brand will not help dilution if that is the root cause. Either correct the cause of the dilution (probably unlikely in this situation) or use an oil with a higher grade. Physics is physics, you're diluting the oil viscosity with a fluid with a very low viscosity.

Besides a UOA that actually measured dilution another way to check would to use a properly rated monograde oil and see if the viscosity still deviates. If it does then it's not mechanical shear.
I think I'm just going to try the slightly thicker Redline 5w30. If it shears, it shears. I'll keep the OCI short.
 

03marin

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Think it is $10 a Jug but Google it!
$10!!!!!!! Lol. C'mon. Honestly, I could care less about the "savings" on an oil change, The suspension alone on this car was over $4k.......obviously saving $10 is of no interest to me. I want the best, and am willing to pay for it. Baffles me as to how some guys will complain about "boutique" oils prices, and then spend $18 on their Venti Mocha Crapola latte from Starbucks.
 
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$10!!!!!!! Lol. C'mon. Honestly, I could care less about the "savings" on an oil change, The suspension alone on this car was over $4k.......obviously saving $10 is of no interest to me. I want the best, and am willing to pay for it. Baffles me as to how some guys will complain about "boutique" oils prices, and then spend $18 on their Venti Mocha Crapola latte from Starbucks.
LOL it is your money but curious minds would like to know just how many 100's of thousand more miles is that oil going to give you?
 

03marin

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LOL it is your money but curious minds would like to know just how many 100's of thousand more miles is that oil going to give you?
Probable none, but you can't prove that it won't either....so it's a wash, but it WILL allow me to go more than 2200 miles on an oil change.
My thinking, and it may (and prob is) wrong, but if I switch to a thicker oil, it will help with the shearing, and get me a few more miles before I need an oil change.
I'm trying to decide between Amsoil SS 10w30 (it sheared the Amsoil SS 5w30) or Redline 5w20 or 5w30. I'm not sure if the Redline 5w30 is too thick. I need someone smarter than me to give me some more insight.
 

OVERKILL

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Probable none, but you can't prove that it won't either....so it's a wash, but it WILL allow me to go more than 2200 miles on an oil change.
My thinking, and it may (and prob is) wrong, but if I switch to a thicker oil, it will help with the shearing, and get me a few more miles before I need an oil change.
I'm trying to decide between Amsoil SS 10w30 (it sheared the Amsoil SS 5w30) or Redline 5w20 or 5w30. I'm not sure if the Redline 5w30 is too thick. I need someone smarter than me to give me some more insight.
You keep saying sheared, but you really don't know if the primary driver of the viscosity loss was that, or fuel dilution. I 2nd @kschachn's plan to run a monograde and get a UOA and see how much viscosity loss there is, that should help determine how much is shear and how much is dilution.

AMSOIL makes or made a monograde 10w-30, which I can't find at the moment, but would be a good one to test with.
 

03marin

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You keep saying sheared, but you really don't know if the primary driver of the viscosity loss was that, or fuel dilution. I 2nd @kschachn's plan to run a monograde and get a UOA and see how much viscosity loss there is, that should help determine how much is shear and how much is dilution.

AMSOIL makes or made a monograde 10w-30, which I can't find at the moment, but would be a good one to test with.
I agree. I believe it sheared due to fuel dilution as well. But if I change oils to an oil that has a higher HTHS than Amsoils SS 5w30 of 3.1, the shearing wouldn't be a problem, regardless if it was mechanical or chemical, right?
Say I went to Redlines 5w30 (3.6), and it sheared down to a 3.1 or something, wouldn't that be better? Instead of shearing a 3.1 oil down to a 2.8 or whatever.
Or am I just not understanding how this works? Lol......which is VERY possible!
 
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Probable none, but you can't prove that it won't either....so it's a wash, but it WILL allow me to go more than 2200 miles on an oil change.
My thinking, and it may (and prob is) wrong, but if I switch to a thicker oil, it will help with the shearing, and get me a few more miles before I need an oil change.
I'm trying to decide between Amsoil SS 10w30 (it sheared the Amsoil SS 5w30) or Redline 5w20 or 5w30. I'm not sure if the Redline 5w30 is too thick. I need someone smarter than me to give me some more insight.
None of these oil will make 10K difference in you car life. 🎣
 

03marin

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None of these oil will make 10K difference in you car life. 🎣
Maybe....maybe not. I look at it this way. That $10 "savings" that I'm giving up, I see it as I'm paying $10 for peace of mind, and to give me that warm and fuzzy feeling. IDK about you guys, but when I was in the Marine Corps, I paid WAY more than $10 for a warm and fuzzy feeling overseas! Lmfao. I see it as a bargain!!!!!
 

OVERKILL

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I agree. I believe it sheared due to fuel dilution as well. But if I change oils to an oil that has a higher HTHS than Amsoils SS 5w30 of 3.1, the shearing wouldn't be a problem, regardless if it was mechanical or chemical, right?
Say I went to Redlines 5w30 (3.6), and it sheared down to a 3.1 or something, wouldn't that be better? Instead of shearing a 3.1 oil down to a 2.8 or whatever.
Or am I just not understanding how this works? Lol......which is VERY possible!
Not to nitpick but shear is a mechanical phenomenon, the action of the VII polymers being sheared by mechanical forces within the engine, like being smashed by the timing chain.

Fuel dilution is, as the name implies, dilution, by virtue of introducing a less viscous substance, reducing the overall viscosity.

So instead of calling it shear it would be more correct to just call it viscosity loss, either from shear or dilution, make sense?

On your posit, that's exactly right, if you have more HTHS margin, viscosity loss being the same, if you start with a higher HTHS, you will have more reserve margin to account for that.
 

03marin

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Not to nitpick but shear is a mechanical phenomenon, the action of the VII polymers being sheared by mechanical forces within the engine, like being smashed by the timing chain.

Fuel dilution is, as the name implies, dilution, by virtue of introducing a less viscous substance, reducing the overall viscosity.

So instead of calling it shear it would be more correct to just call it viscosity loss, either from shear or dilution, make sense?

On your posit, that's exactly right, if you have more HTHS margin, viscosity loss being the same, if you start with a higher HTHS, you will have more reserve margin to account for that.
Ok, now that makes more sense. I was using the wrong termination. It's Viscosity loss, not "shear".
Thanks for clearing that up.
That was my thought process. Get something with a little higher HTHS for that margin.
 
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Yes, there's almost always a 'too much' of something. Higher HTHS is higher viscosity and higher viscosity equates to higher drag (viscosity is a fluid's resistance to flow). So yes, elevated protection comes at at price. Is it noticeable? I've been under the impression I felt the difference when I went from 0W-30 to 5W-40 on my GTI, its engine felt a tad sluggish. On two of my cars if not in many cases a 5W-30 with a HTHS between 3.5 and 3.7 seems to be a sweet spot. Viscosity is even much more noticeable in a manual transmission. I went from 75W-80 back to 75W-90 on my Mini's Getrag which means roughly double the viscosity at almost any temp this gearbox sees and it's immediately noticeable - it's stiffer shifting, while the engine's power is masking the effect of a thicker engine oil to some extent.
.
 
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03marin

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Yes, there's almost always a 'too much' of something. Higher HTHS is higher viscosity and higher viscosity equates to higher drag (viscosity is a fluid's resistance to flow). So yes, elevated protection comes at at price. Is it noticeable? I've been under the impression I felt the difference when I went from 0W-30 to 5W-40 on my GTI, its engine felt a tad sluggish. On two of my cars if not in many cases a 5W-30 with a HTHS between 3.5 and 3.7 seems to be a sweet spot. Viscosity is even much more noticeable in a manual transmission. I went from 75W-80 back to 75W-90 on my Mini's Getrag which means roughly double the viscosity at almost any temp this gearbox sees and it's immediately noticeable - it's stiffer shifting, while the engine's power is masking the effect of a thicker engine oil to some extent.
.maybe
Maybe I will just stick with the Amsoil, and just plan on changing it out every 2500 miles. It's seems to be working pretty well......except for the whole viscosity loss issue.
 
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