Quality difference between milk "brands"?

Joined
Jun 8, 2016
Messages
2,087
Location
Texas, USA
Braum's in my favorite for taste and longevity. Great Value is the worst of both worlds. I can easily finish a gallon of Braum's before it starts to smell sour. I've yet to make my way through a gallon of Great Value in the last year before I detect sour. Aldi's milk has been a nice surprise as it performs a lot like Braum's. Borden from Kroger is hit-or-miss.
 
Joined
Oct 31, 2017
Messages
3,083
Location
California
Don't look up 'milk cows mastitis.'

I buy milk in glass bottles. The other packaging affects the taste negatively.
 
Last edited:
Joined
Oct 5, 2005
Messages
5,178
Location
Kansas
Just posting to clarify a few things about cows and milk. First, cows no longer eat grass. Cows ate grass decades ago when every farmer had a few pigs for butchering and a few cows so the farmer could have some milk to drink every day. Back then, milking cows (cows are often "dry", a time when the cow doesn't give milk to prepare the animal to have a strong, healthy offspring), were penned up at night close to the milk barn and then milked once in the morning and once in the evening. During the day, they were put in the pasture to eat grass. Unless you currently buy your milk from some farmer who only has a couple of cows, now your milking cows are either in the barn getting milked, or they are in a "loafing" or a "free stall" barn where they eat, drink and sleep. The food is brought to them, which usually consists of silage (the complete corn stalk is chopped up for feed) and a little bit of roughage, such as hay or alfalfa. A very small amount of ground-up grain may also be given to them, which could be made from the seed of corn or milo.
When that cow is being milked, she doesn't know and couldn't care less if her milk goes to WalMart, Aldi or some other place where the milk is sold for twice the amount. Feed CAN affect the taste of milk, but most dairy farms feed the same feed 365 days a year. However, a sudden introduction of fresh feed or if the small farmer suddenly switches from fermented feed to fresh feed, can definitely change the taste of milk.
When you taste the difference of your milk between the brands, it's because of how the milk was treated or stored after the milk comes out of the cow. We have a local mom-and-pop grocery store that sells milk that will be good until the the date printed on the carton and not any later. Some other milk in my area sold by WM or Aldi's can taste good a week after that date.
Yes, I grew up on a dairy farm.
 
Joined
Nov 23, 2011
Messages
5,149
Location
Lima, Ohio, USA
this is the small local dairy I get milk from.(link to their FAQ page)
https://knuevencreamery.com/pages/faqs

I have a Subscription with them for a 1/2 gal each of Whole and Chocolate milk every 2 weeks. Costs me $7 every 2 weeks. Delivered. They would Deliver here, nearly to the edge of their delivery zone, but i feel bad asking them to come this far, and have it delivered to my sister's place, maybe 10 mi from their farm. (gives me an excuse to visit her and the kids every 2 weeks)

the whole is mostly used in Coffee/Tea. (I'm the only one in the family that's not Lactose Intolerant.) the Chocolate I drink straight from the jug, a slug or 2 a day, just like god intended.

the whole milk is mildly vat pasteurized, and Non- homogenized. you do need to shake it to get the cream back into suspension.

main reason i know of them is b/c my nephew's friend who works there, and brought my sisters fam all sorts of products back when they were in their test phase, before they were allowed to sell anything....
 
Joined
May 6, 2005
Messages
7,334
Location
San Francisco Bay Area
Just posting to clarify a few things about cows and milk. First, cows no longer eat grass. Cows ate grass decades ago when every farmer had a few pigs for butchering and a few cows so the farmer could have some milk to drink every day. Back then, milking cows (cows are often "dry", a time when the cow doesn't give milk to prepare the animal to have a strong, healthy offspring), were penned up at night close to the milk barn and then milked once in the morning and once in the evening. During the day, they were put in the pasture to eat grass. Unless you currently buy your milk from some farmer who only has a couple of cows, now your milking cows are either in the barn getting milked, or they are in a "loafing" or a "free stall" barn where they eat, drink and sleep. The food is brought to them, which usually consists of silage (the complete corn stalk is chopped up for feed) and a little bit of roughage, such as hay or alfalfa. A very small amount of ground-up grain may also be given to them, which could be made from the seed of corn or milo.
When that cow is being milked, she doesn't know and couldn't care less if her milk goes to WalMart, Aldi or some other place where the milk is sold for twice the amount. Feed CAN affect the taste of milk, but most dairy farms feed the same feed 365 days a year. However, a sudden introduction of fresh feed or if the small farmer suddenly switches from fermented feed to fresh feed, can definitely change the taste of milk.
When you taste the difference of your milk between the brands, it's because of how the milk was treated or stored after the milk comes out of the cow. We have a local mom-and-pop grocery store that sells milk that will be good until the the date printed on the carton and not any later. Some other milk in my area sold by WM or Aldi's can taste good a week after that date.
Yes, I grew up on a dairy farm.

I don't know about your area, but I see dairy cows in the field eating grass. There are dairy cows in every county in the San Francisco Bay Area except for San Francisco. I live in the hills where there's actually cattle grazing a few miles away. I've gone hiking in some parks where the cattle were actually quite calm, even with calves.

I certainly understand that most of what dairy cows eat is some sort of feed, but I still see local ranches where they're wandering around the pasture before being brought back for milking.
 
Top