Pre winter car preparation

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5,295
What wax did you use. I just did my Forester yesterday with Turtle Wax Ice, the liquid (spray) version. Decent shine but nothing to write home about, ridiculously easy on/off and doubles as protectant on the plastic trim and lenses of head and tail lights. Given the ease of use and almost water like consistency, durability may be questionable or down right poor. I usually use REJEX aerospace sealant, which has superior durability through everything winter throws at it but it is tedious to use and stains the black plastic trim if it gets on it.
 
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19,528
Location
Lake Forest, CA
Originally Posted By: LoneRanger
What wax did you use. I just did my Forester yesterday with Turtle Wax Ice, the liquid (spray) version. Decent shine but nothing to write home about, ridiculously easy on/off and doubles as protectant on the plastic trim and lenses of head and tail lights. Given the ease of use and almost water like consistency, durability may be questionable or down right poor. I usually use REJEX aerospace sealant, which has superior durability through everything winter throws at it but it is tedious to use and stains the black plastic trim if it gets on it.
I'm looking for "easy on/off" since I'm very lazy in term of washing/waxing my cars. So far, I tried Eagle One "Wax-as-you-Dry" once or twice a year, non of my cars had a real wax for more than 6-7 years. I will try Liquid Turtle Wax Ice on my next car washes probably next spring, since we may have some good rainy days this winter, I'll let mother nature wash the cars for me. Thanks for the tip.
 
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4,398
Location
Connecticut
I'm still in the stone ages when it comes to waxing/protecting the car. My previous daily driver ('97 Lincoln Cont) didn't get a single waxing in the 8 years that I owned it (terrible, huh?). I took it from 22K miles to 232K miles until the engine seized. Even before that happened it was basically a parts car because of the under-carriage rust, and numerous little issues. I'd have taken $400-$500 for it. The paint on the car was quite faded on top but it was not blistered or rusting. It was still a rust free sheet metal car after no-maintenance other than frequent car wash visits to spray the junk off it. Every body panel on the car in prime condition for re-use. On my latest daily driver I did start a twice per year waxing routine with Carnuba wax. No sealer, no polish, nothing else. Wash and wax. After 6 years the 2002 Lincoln still gleams, it's extremely clean on top and underneath. It's not garaged. Just waxing the car is a pain for my back. I'm not sure I could even attempt a clay bar, sealer, wax, etc. But I'm considering advancing myself another step. The wheels on KrisZ's car are hopefully just plastic wheel covers over steel wheels. If you let alloy wheels go very long with any brake dust on them it will start the corrosion process. Both my Lincolns had alloy wheels and the '97's were a basket case by the time I sold it (50-65% rusted). All 4 wheels leaked air and needed a charge every 1-2 weeks. They looked horrible too. I waited too long to start a weekly cleaning regimen on them. On my 2002 I started right away. But those 7 years under the 1st owner already allowed some spots to get started. After 13 years they are still about 85-90% rust free in the slots, the hot zone....holding up many times better than the '97 did. If you drive heavily in winter salt, this may have to be done after every drive. Either that or some type of protective coating applied when the car is new or nearly so. Corrosion is at its peak between 30-40 deg F. If it's too cold the rust process is much slower. Parking a slushy car in a 35 deg garage might be one of the worst things for it. It definitely doesn't help much for a concrete floor.
 

KrisZ

Thread starter
Originally Posted By: LoneRanger
What wax did you use. I just did my Forester yesterday with Turtle Wax Ice, the liquid (spray) version. Decent shine but nothing to write home about, ridiculously easy on/off and doubles as protectant on the plastic trim and lenses of head and tail lights. Given the ease of use and almost water like consistency, durability may be questionable or down right poor. I usually use REJEX aerospace sealant, which has superior durability through everything winter throws at it but it is tedious to use and stains the black plastic trim if it gets on it.
The finish you see is after washing the car with ONR (Optimum No Rinse), the car hasn't been waxed in about 3 years. However if you want an easy to apply protectant that lasts a long time, use a sealant called Opti-Seal. There is really no on-off application to it, you just apply it very sparingly with a sponge applicator. And it works in direct sunlight as well.
Originally Posted By: 69GTX
The wheels on KrisZ's car are hopefully just plastic wheel covers over steel wheels. If you let alloy wheels go very long with any brake dust on them it will start the corrosion process. Both my Lincolns had alloy wheels and the '97's were a basket case by the time I sold it (50-65% rusted). All 4 wheels leaked air and needed a charge every 1-2 weeks. They looked horrible too. I waited too long to start a weekly cleaning regimen on them. On my 2002 I started right away. But those 7 years under the 1st owner already allowed some spots to get started. After 13 years they are still about 85-90% rust free in the slots, the hot zone....holding up many times better than the '97 did. If you drive heavily in winter salt, this may have to be done after every drive. Either that or some type of protective coating applied when the car is new or nearly so. Corrosion is at its peak between 30-40 deg F. If it's too cold the rust process is much slower. Parking a slushy car in a 35 deg garage might be one of the worst things for it. It definitely doesn't help much for a concrete floor.
These wheels are aluminum, but they are painted, or maybe powder coated IDK, but they are holding up so far pretty well and I have a dedicated set of steel wheels for winter. But unprotected aluminum wheels do tend to oxidize pretty badly if not taken care of.
 
Messages
3,996
Location
United States of America
I am kind of questioning frequent waxings. A family memer's Avalon got very frequent details for probably five years. I think he used a machine buffer and some no-name wax, but the hood looks terrible...like the paint is degrading. Growing up, my Subpnbird was waxed and cared for quite often...same result-ugly hood. I think some OMs just say occasional waxing or polishing, like once or twice a year is sufficient.
 
Messages
724
Location
MB - Manitoba
Turtle wax ice works great if you use a cleaner wax first. The paint has to be clean. I use turtle wax ice on my airplane. Its the only stuff that works well on its paint.
 
Messages
12,517
Location
OH
Originally Posted By: 69GTX
On my latest daily driver I did start a twice per year waxing routine with Carnuba wax. No sealer, no polish, nothing else. Wash and wax. After 6 years the 2002 Lincoln still gleams, it's extremely clean on top and underneath. It's not garaged. Just waxing the car is a pain for my back. I'm not sure I could even attempt a clay bar, sealer, wax, etc. But I'm considering advancing myself another step.
A nanoskin sponge is around $13 on www.autogeek.net. No need to throw out if dropped on the ground, don't have to fold the clay, just rinse it in the bucket and works just as well. Get the "fine" grade one to minimize any scratching. You will need Detailer. Spray the panel, glide the sponge across the panel, wipe with a plush MF. Done! The Ultima detailer concentrate works great and has some protection in it so you can stop there.
 
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Messages
974
Location
Orlando, FL
Originally Posted By: LoneRanger
What wax did you use. I just did my Forester yesterday with Turtle Wax Ice, the liquid (spray) version. Decent shine but nothing to write home about, ridiculously easy on/off and doubles as protectant on the plastic trim and lenses of head and tail lights. Given the ease of use and almost water like consistency, durability may be questionable or down right poor. I usually use REJEX aerospace sealant, which has superior durability through everything winter throws at it but it is tedious to use and stains the black plastic trim if it gets on it.
I used turtle wax ice spray on the car last weekend. That's the weekend after I had put Nu Finish Polish on it. Turtle Wax spray is very easy to use. And I was impressed with the results (maybe it has to do with the car already having a layer of Nu Finish on it). Anyways, I too am interested in the durability of it since it's so easy.
 
Messages
12,517
Location
OH
I think Turtle Wax is bottom of the barrel. It's always a little bit cheaperer for mediocre results. Not well reguarded on the detail forums or by professionals. You won't find any of their products on www.autogeek.net which sells a ton of different detailing supplies. Meguiars, Mothers, even Nufinish and so many others are good to very good.
 
Messages
3,996
Location
United States of America
First we want the paint to protect the metal underneath from rusting....then aerodynamics, then looks, ease of use, durability, cost etc. Probably want to go with the least abrasive possible, then only reapply after the paint appears dry and quits beading to your satisfaction. Dont want to stand by idly and really do not want to invest our effort, other's effort, resources, time, and such and overdo it and make things worse. As with much, a fine line somewhere in the middle is optimal!
 
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