Pre 2007 diesel oil question

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CI-4+ and older had no limits on ash and other metallic additives that are implicated in plugging DPFs, if you think catalytic converters are expensive, I don't think you wanna find out how expensive a DPF is, stick to CJ-4 or newer or equivalent ACEA sequences and appropriate manufacturer approvals in HD diesels that are equip with a DPF.
 

Steve F

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Thanks for the replies. If I could make my DPF and the electronics that communicate with it
go away and not cause my engine and shifting to behave abnormally would this older spec oil
then become an excellent oil choice for great engine longevity with no downsides?

SAE 15W-40 Heavy-Duty Diesel and Marine Oil
 
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Agree with the others above it’s emissions related. A plugged DPF will set you back a big chunk of change.

Good luck getting the electronics and necessary parts to modify your truck. The EPA has cracked down hard on suppliers in the last couple years. By some small miracle you do get it done I would say that oil won’t hurt your engine. It likely has higher zinc / ZDDP amounts.

Just my $0.02
 
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Thanks for the replies. If I could make my DPF and the electronics that communicate with it
go away and not cause my engine and shifting to behave abnormally would this older spec oil
then become an excellent oil choice for great engine longevity with no downsides?

SAE 15W-40 Heavy-Duty Diesel and Marine Oil
If you do what they are now calling, "Putting truck on a diet" in other words deleting all the emission stuff, then you could run that oil. Just curious but why are you looking at this oil? Do you have a boat and want to use all the same oil?

There are still a few places that will delete emissions on diesels but not many. The EPA is cracking down hard on them.
 
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Concur with above. A “deleted” engine will find this sort of oil very agreeable, and in fact better than current oils for the remaining high sulfur countries.
But you should have done the deed 5 years ago, it’s a bit late….
 
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Thanks for the replies. If I could make my DPF and the electronics that communicate with it
go away and not cause my engine and shifting to behave abnormally would this older spec oil
then become an excellent oil choice for great engine longevity with no downsides?

SAE 15W-40 Heavy-Duty Diesel and Marine Oil
If you hit a bump and the DPF "fell off", then CI-4/+ would last longer than the newer oils, especially with the ULSD in use today. DPF & urea systems are why all my diesels have gone away (except the F-Super Duty, don't want to throw away big $ on a newer one). I'm not convinced that even CK-4 completely prevents DPF plugging failure, it just postpones it until it's out of warranty!🙃
 

Steve F

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If you do what they are now calling, "Putting truck on a diet" in other words deleting all the emission stuff, then you could run that oil. Just curious but why are you looking at this oil? Do you have a boat and want to use all the same oil?

There are still a few places that will delete emissions on diesels but not many. The EPA is cracking down hard on them.
I don't really have a need for this oil per se. I really just want to get something settled in my mind about the ability and the quality of this oil in comparison to these new emissions approved oils.
I know not to and I'am not running this older formulation in my newer vehicle. This question is mostly just for me so let me ask it this way to see if I can get resolve.
A while back they started removing some of the beneficial components of our oil for the sake of our catalytic converters. Fast forward to diesel vehicles and now we have emissions equipment that again need an oil with some of these beneficial components removed.
So here is my scenario...
This is hypothetical but I should be able to get an answer.
You have two identical 2500 diesel pickups. They would be modern, efficient and capable just like our new equipment but without the omissions components that clog them up and choke them off reburn things and over complicate the design.
So you're running these two vehicles in the different capacities that we all use them for. I'm going to refer Amsoil but it could be any other oil with the same parameters I suspect.
One truck has the older 15/40 formulation spec that I've been speaking of and one truck has the newer formulation for emissions purposes.
Given that you're changing your oil at proper intervals and piling up the mileage and years on these vehicles is one engine going to live longer and be cleaner than the other?
Does the older formulation have the best of the best to take care of the engine and protect it and provide great longevity?
Is the newest formulation the absolute best to allow this engine live longer than the older formulation?
 
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I don't really have a need for this oil per se. I really just want to get something settled in my mind about the ability and the quality of this oil in comparison to these new emissions approved oils.
I know not to and I'am not running this older formulation in my newer vehicle. This question is mostly just for me so let me ask it this way to see if I can get resolve.
A while back they started removing some of the beneficial components of our oil for the sake of our catalytic converters. Fast forward to diesel vehicles and now we have emissions equipment that again need an oil with some of these beneficial components removed.
So here is my scenario...
This is hypothetical but I should be able to get an answer.
You have two identical 2500 diesel pickups. They would be modern, efficient and capable just like our new equipment but without the omissions components that clog them up and choke them off reburn things and over complicate the design.
So you're running these two vehicles in the different capacities that we all use them for. I'm going to refer Amsoil but it could be any other oil with the same parameters I suspect.
One truck has the older 15/40 formulation spec that I've been speaking of and one truck has the newer formulation for emissions purposes.
Given that you're changing your oil at proper intervals and piling up the mileage and years on these vehicles is one engine going to live longer and be cleaner than the other?
Does the older formulation have the best of the best to take care of the engine and protect it and provide great longevity?
Is the newest formulation the absolute best to allow this engine live longer than the older formulation?

I'll be honest I think you are splitting hairs here. It is not the oil that is driving newer trucks to the grave it is the emissions crap on them. EGR's pump burnt fuel air mixtures back through the engine. This increases the soot in the oil and carbon inside the air intake and CAC's. The extra canisters hanging of the exhaust pipes don't really help much either, but FT4 (DEF) did reduce some EGR use over iT4 (pre-DEF) vintage trucks...

In short to answer your question, my opinion would be in your scenario both trucks could go several hundred thousand miles without an oil failure, old or new formula. The older formula has ZDDP. The newer formula replaces some of the ZDDP with additives like Moly, Calclium, Phosphorus etc, to compensate for ZDDP. On top of this more diesel engine manufacturers are moving to hydraulic lifters and this reduces the need for Zinc and ZDDP.

Just my $0.02
 
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