Potenza RE930i

NJC

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3,013
Location
Vancouver BC
I had Potenza 205/60/15's on the front of my Volvo wagon ... in grooved or uneven road conditions the car moved around laterally. All suspension bushings check out OK. I swapped the Potenzas to the back and brought the Toyos to front and it definitely helped the lateral movement problem. The Potenzas were kept at equal pressure, no excessive wear patterns etc. Questions: 1. Opinions of the RE930? 2. Looking at Costco for next set: either Michelin or BF Goodrich. Suggestions? I'll be going back to a 195/60/15. Mostly concerned with quietness and handling.
 
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6,091
Location
northern Alabama
Are you looking for (4) all-season tires or summer tires which you usually swap out for winter tires? What model of Toyo tires are on the front now? Why are you going back to 195/60/15? I have never had a set of BFGoodrich tires before. I assume that you have done some research at Tire Rack? If not, I would head over there. Of the two brands you mentioned, I would pick the BFGoodrich Traction T/A H based on what TR sells. However, it is a directional tire & I don't know how what you think about that. Michelin tires are expensive (at least to me).
 
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40,718
Location
Great Lakes
If we're talking about all-season tires, also check out Yokohama Avid H4S. I've been very pleased with mine so far (also in size 195/60/15). BTW, I've never heard of RE930. Is it an older model?
 
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40,718
Location
Great Lakes
NJC, we're not necessarily telling you to buy from TR, just do your research there, as it's got a load of good info and test comparisons, plus user reviews which are helpful to some extent, too. As far as your lateral pull, I doubt a difference between 205 and 195 will account for a noticeable improvement. More important would be tread pattern, sidewall stiffness, and rubber compound (stickiness/rolling resistance), me thinks. Also check out your alignment.
 
quote:
Originally posted by NJC: I'm looking for all-season tires I want the smaller tires to minimize the effect of lateral pull in the grooved road.
I may be misreading you, but I think you are laboring under two incorrect assumptions. The second of those is that the width of the footprint is the primary determinant of the tendency to pull. While it is true that on a relatively smooth surface, a footprint that is relatively longer and narrower is more directionally stable than one that is wider and shorter, within the range of sizes you are looking at, the effect is so minor that it is completely swamped by other factors. The grooved pavement problem you allude to is generally called "tramlining" and is most affected by the tread pattern: two tires of the same size may be drastically different in tramlining characteristics. The first of the two (possibly, if I read you correctly) incorrect assumptions is more fundamental, and contravenes conventional wisdom drummed into our brains by repetitive advertising. For wet streets, "all season" tires are the worst type of tires you can have. The "all season" designation refers to traction in light, unpacked snow, which is gained by making the tread compound not repel water as "summer" tires do. That means that on wet roads. a thin film of water adheres to the tread (as it was designed to do for snow traction) and reduces the friction available to the tread for wet braking. Your sig line says you are in Vancouver, B.C., about 300 miles north of where I am. As we do, you get a lot of rain and very little snow. If my assumption is correct, you would be much better served by a "summer" tire for better braking on the many wet days than by an all season tire for better traction on the few snowy days. Bottom line for your original question: Dunlop SP Sport 01 in the 205/60-15 size. (It is not a tire for driving in the snow, however.)
 

NJC

Thread starter
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3,013
Location
Vancouver BC
Guys, sorry for the lack of info. I'm looking for all-season tires and have not looked at Tire Rack since I assume it would be a hassle to ship into Canada. I want the smaller tires to minimize the effect of lateral pull in the grooved road. Pete, I've only had the car for 2yrs but I suspect the RE930's are an older model. And benjamming, not sure about the model of Toyos although they are a hard compound and NOISY.
 

NJC

Thread starter
Messages
3,013
Location
Vancouver BC
Good points made. Considering the difference between 205/195 is only 10mm it probably won't amount to much. And hadn't thought of the summer vs all-season designations ... nor did I know that was called "tramlining." Thanks GC4, great info. EDIT Tirerack is an excellent source of info. [Cheers!] [ September 08, 2006, 05:03 PM: Message edited by: NJC ]
 
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