Please give me Chili ideas!!!!!!

JHZR2

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New Jersey
Hi, I've been invited to a Chili cookoff... I make a good Chili (both Cincinnati and Texas style, IMO), but are looking for ideas of how others make it, to really knock it out of the ballpark. I'm curious particularly with respect to spices that you use or 'different' ingredients that one may not always think of. Id love to see your full recipe too! JMH
 
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1,141
Location
Texas
First off I would start off by cubing my own chili meat. I would get choice rib eyes. Of course this is just my opinion; I really don't know much about making chili, but, I don't like biting into gristle. I think prime could be a little too fat. Maybe even lightly grill the meat over charcoal (not propane) with your favorite water soaked hardwood shavings prior to cubing. Maybe prior to grilling I would marinate the meat in a suitable liquid which would probably contain beer. I would stew fresh homegrown tomatoes and prefer other fresh ingredients rather than packaged ones. My wife listens to cooking programs a lot, so, of course I do too, but, apparently appearance is important to some. Personally, I don't care. My preferred food is beans and cornbread slopped on a plate as quickly as possible. Maybe get an original bowl and garnish the top with a little bit of cilantro, fresh onion, and red and yellow bell pepper and cheese. I would use cilantro very sparingly, or possibly use some other green with a less pungent taste. I like cilantro, but, it took quite a while to develop a taste for the herb. Well, of course, put some crackers on the side. Next
 
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1,908
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Fort Worth, TX
PM sent. For chili you do not want any meat but mature (non-tender) meat. No prime this or that. Just good beef shoulder (chuck) cut to the size of a shelled peanut, or ground at 1/2". Chili has to simmer (185-190F) for several hours. My recipe calls for a total of three after initial mild boil of ingredients. Genuine chile peppers taste the best. All cutesy stuff (californio) is something besides chili. It might as well be beef stew with beans & tomatoes under some Tabasco sauce.
 

JHZR2

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New Jersey
TheTanSedan, I sent you a PM, but am not sure if it went through... Thanks again for all of the information, it is most appreciated!! JMH
 
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1,027
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East Helena, Montana
I suggest that you do a Google search for "Chili recipes". My wife never made Southern Fried Chicken or Chicken Fried Steak, both of which I love. So a few years ago I decided to start making them myself. For each, I started by doing a Google search for recipes. I got an enormous number of hits containing recipes, tips, historical data, etc. You can then pick and choose from the recipes. What I did, after a lot of reading, was develope a basic recipe of my own for each, drawing what sounded good from the online recipes, and in my starting point recipe I listed variations. Then I started experimenting with the recipe and the variations. After a few months I had come up with a recipe for each that I liked and have stuck with.
 
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1,908
Location
Fort Worth, TX
Quote:
I suggest that you do a Google search for "Chili recipes". My wife never made Southern Fried Chicken or Chicken Fried Steak, both of which I love. So a few years ago I decided to start making them myself. For each, I started by doing a Google search for recipes. I got an enormous number of hits containing recipes, tips, historical data, etc. You can then pick and choose from the recipes. What I did, after a lot of reading, was develope a basic recipe of my own for each, drawing what sounded good from the online recipes, and in my starting point recipe I listed variations. Then I started experimenting with the recipe and the variations. After a few months I had come up with a recipe for each that I liked and have stuck with.
This is my approach. For chili, it denotes (forgive the cliche) a state of mind. I've been doing the same with Chicken Fried Steak, Fried Chicken and other kinds of home cooking. Figure if I get a dozen or two under my belt then I can call myself a cook (assuming the side dishes to go with them). As to state of mind, I think on what it felt like to have worked so hard I'd sweated my clothes through several times in one day. And been at that work for several days; when food is no more than fuel. And that a bowl of chili -- with fixins'-- was the perfect antidote. However, unlike jmacmaster, I don't wear my western hat while cooking . . just the boots. (Think I'll start a thread on Fried Chicken. Found, and have been adapting a recipe recently. Let's see what you all have as well). JHZR2, yes, thanks, received the reply. Holler with any questions.
 
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1,908
Location
Fort Worth, TX
Here's another recipe that is easier to make than the one I sent (and posted a shorter version of). I think this is pretty close to what people think of nowadays when they hear "Texas Chili". I like the idea of cooking the chili powder into the meat. I may try that with some homemade (single chile) powder. Another popular chili recipe can be googled under CHASEN'S RESTAURANT and ELIZABETH TAYLOR. Hard to miss with it, I made it for years starting in college. --------------------------------------------------------- Chili Recipe: RENO RED This is the chili recipe that virtually won the west changing the way chili was judged in I.C.S. In 1978 this recipe won a regional chili cookoff held in Reno Nevada. Prior to this time most of the chili recipes were comprised of large quantities of vegetables and tomato sauce. This is the Texas style chili recipe that has won four world championships. ------------------------------------------------------------ 5 pounds coarsely ground heavy beef chuck, round or brisket. 1/4 cup wesson oil or rendered kidney suet. 2 medium onions 5 level teaspoons of Cumin seeds 8 heaping tablespoons of commercial chili powder 3 cloves of garlic 2 tablespoons of msg (optional) 5- 15 Chili pods, depending on heat level desired (if pods are not available, use cayenne pepper to taste) 1 teaspoon dried oregano leaves -------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Cooking Instructions : Remove stems, membrane and seeds from chili pods, cover with water and simmer for 30 minutes. Remove pods and blend into paste. Hold water. Chop onions. Crack cumin with rolling in or grind with mortar and pestle. Brew 1 teaspoon oregano leaves in 1 cup of water Brown meat in several batches, add black pepper while browning, Brown onions with meat then remove with slotted spoon and hold. Combine browned meat, onion and add the following : cumin, 8 heaping tablespoons of commercial chili powder, 3 cloves garlic (pressed) and msg. Cook ten minutes, using just enough pepper water to keep from burning. Stir constantly. This cooks the spices into the meat. Add chili paste and half of oregano water. Cook slowly, adding pepper water as necessary. Add additional oregano to taste, salt to taste. The meat should tender in around 1-1/2 hours. *Make sure you get chili powder, not a chili mix or ground chili pepper! Variations : Add 1 to 2 cans of tomato sauce 8oz. Hand cut meat to about the size of a navy bean. (A lot of contestants now use half chili grind and half hand cut) Add 2 tablespoons of vinegar 10 minutes before serving. Use white pepper instead of black pepper Use masa flour to thicken (mix flour with cold water and whisk until smooth, then pour in while stirring) ---------------------------------------------------------- Five pounds of beef is too much. Try three with this. The key to good chili is the beef suet. Doesn't take much but adds tremendously; there is no good substitute. With the masa harina (corn flour) only use a little at first to thicken. I don't use it at all. I draw the line at tomatoes, and I can't say what I think about vinegar. I'd leave out the MSG. And be sure to get Mexican, not Greek oregano.
 
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90
Location
Asheville, NC
Interesting recipe tansedan. Note that chilli powder is comprised of oregano, cumin, and red pepper. I also add extra oregano. I also prefer to use tomatoes and tomato juice I can myself. I prefer use different beans than kidney beans with pintos and small red beans being my favorite. My preference is a ground wild game meat in chilli, either deer or elk (it's a textural issue). My secret ingredients are ginger (just a pinch to accent the flavor of the veggies) and a little cilantro (not enough to taste per se). I liked adding the hit of smoked Chipoltle's and I highly recomend adding this flavor in conjunction with other red peppers. Other interesting flavors that can be added to chilli are Rotel, a hershey's kiss or two, or coffee. Good luck man.
 
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