Parriffin based oils?

Messages
702
Location
Ilinois
Just heard that Pennzoil is paraffin based and is a sludge prone oil from a local mechanic. He wouldn't let me get in a word edgewise. IS there proof this is false?
 
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1,261
Location
KY
I've found it's better just to let them beleive what they want than too argue about it. 9 times outta 10 there not going too listen anyways. Just point them to BITOG. [Smile]
 

SSQ

Messages
209
Location
OR
it's going to be hard to prove, as both the car maintaince and the oil can contribute to formation of sludge. Those who's got the sludge in their car will blame it on the oil and those who like the oil would blame it on the car. Pennzoil was rumoured to be a sludgy oil, and some people stand strongly behind that claim. There really isn't much proof, but if you worry that it's gonna cause sludge, there are lots of good oils other than Pennzoil for around the same price.
 
Messages
550
Location
Wisconsin
This topic has been beaten to death in the past. You can use the search function to find lots of posts, but here's the short answer: Paraffin does not mean wax, it is an old term used to describe properties of certain petroleum products. It literally means "without affinity" . . . in other words something that's chemically stable. Paraffin wax and paraffin oil describe two different types of petroleum products that tend not to break down easily. Who wouldn't want their motor oil to be chemically stable? Crude oils that tend to refine into nice clear oils and white waxes rather than smelly reactive compounds and sticky black tars are also termed paraffinic, as opposed to being naphthenic or asphaltic. Historically, a particularly good paraffinic crude for making motor oil came from Pennsylvania (the Quaker State) and that is where the brands originated. Now their crude oil mainly comes in on big tankers from who-knows-where. Modern refining methods can make equivalent base oils out of a variety of crudes. These urban myths about Pennzoil will never die. In its current formulation it is a very good conventional oil, probably better than many of the other brands. [ April 12, 2006, 04:58 PM: Message edited by: BigAl ]
 
Messages
4,009
Location
Calgary Canada
Ask him to tell you what parrafin is. From what I remember from high school chemistry, paraffin is a really long chain hydrocarbon that is separated from the shorter chain hydrocarbons like the ones that make up gasoline, through a distilling process applied to crude oil. I think in the UK diesel or kerosine is referred to as paraffin. I have to admit I'm not sure what paraffin is.
 
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4,478
Location
Southern California
quote:
Originally posted by 95_carvan: Just point them to BITOG.
Great, just what this site needs - additional morons ranting on about the alleged evils of paraffin?) [Roll Eyes]
 
Messages
1,381
Location
Southeast Kentucky
Folks who know nothing of chemistry hear the word 'paraffin' think of the paraffin wax you buy in the grocery store to make candles and candy. As my Mom says, "You can't teach anyone who already knows it all".
 
Messages
14,013
Location
Retired | Wausau, WI
I could go in to a long explanation on this but I've done it at least 6 times and it's all posted here somewhere. So to keep it simple the answer is NO! Take the local mechanic out back and [Dual]
 
Messages
8,711
Location
Nothern USA
quote:
Originally posted by 95_carvan: I've found it's better just to let them beleive what they want than too argue about it. 9 times outta 10 there not going too listen anyways. Just point them to BITOG. [Smile]
Like Molekule, I am a chemist. Paraffin comes from the Greek para affin, without affinity. It just don't react with nothing. Well it burns. It can be applied to a wide range of H(CH2)nH compounds where n can be any number from 1 to thousands. Methane, ethane, propane, butane, ... octane... kerosene... oil...wax............polyethylene......ultra high molecular weight polyethylene. Chemically and physically, they only vary in degree. Let your mechanic try this. Take a wax birthday candle and put it in a tin can along with a couple of ounces of Pennzoil. Heat it gently until the candle dissolves. I used my quartz shop lamp. Then put it in the freezer. In a couple of hours, you will have some very thick oil, but no wax deposit.
 
Messages
6,431
Location
New Braunfels
This always comes up yet BITOGers are here to set the facts straight if one asks this question. Penzzoil is well formulated well distributed and you can pick a quart up for top off just about anywhere. What's not to like? Will somebody who is well versed please describe ISO-Paraffins and how they are differnt than your regular paraffin? This will get all the Parafin issues on one thread.
 
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