P1457 on a Honda

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18,168
Location
NH
Our '03 CRV threw a couple of codes a while ago; I misread the P1457 as an O2 sensor error (apparently it is on BMW's but not Honda--how that works I don't get, they're supposed to be standardized, no?). Apparently it's an evap code. So the last time it set the code I went to check the gas cap, see if the seal was bad. The tank promptly vented, as it had been sitting for a few days outside, in the sun and whatnot--so I think the cap is fine, and much of the system is holding, but either it's a sensor, valve or wiring problem.

I'm on the fence if I should just find a shop and have them look at it? I don't mind tossing a part or two at it, but I don't even have a scanner for this vehicle, let alone some what to pressurize nor smoke test this system. I read a few threads online about this and it sounded like this was a pain in the rear to fix--not sure I want to pay a shop to fix, but at the same time, it sounds like it is out of my league.

What are the odds it's a simple part to swap out?
 

supton

Thread starter
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18,168
Location
NH
Messages
3,051
Location
The Northeast
I think my Accord had that same code several years back. Luckily, a new gas cap from the dealer fixed it (old one had fine cracks on the gasket).

If it isn't the cap and you don't want to pay a shop to possibly fire the parts cannon, you could just live with it.

Does your state have inspections?
 
Messages
822
Location
Cali
Our '03 CRV threw a couple of codes a while ago; I misread the P1457 as an O2 sensor error (apparently it is on BMW's but not Honda--how that works I don't get, they're supposed to be standardized, no?). Apparently it's an evap code. So the last time it set the code I went to check the gas cap, see if the seal was bad. The tank promptly vented, as it had been sitting for a few days outside, in the sun and whatnot--so I think the cap is fine, and much of the system is holding, but either it's a sensor, valve or wiring problem.

I'm on the fence if I should just find a shop and have them look at it? I don't mind tossing a part or two at it, but I don't even have a scanner for this vehicle, let alone some what to pressurize nor smoke test this system. I read a few threads online about this and it sounded like this was a pain in the rear to fix--not sure I want to pay a shop to fix, but at the same time, it sounds like it is out of my league.

What are the odds it's a simple part to swap out?

There is a leak towards the fuel tank side. Since you dont have the proper tools, I would make sure your fuel cap has a good seal and make sure it is tight. You can reset the engine light by disconnecting the battery. Drive it a couple days and see if it comes back on. If it does, it needs to be smoke tested to find the leak.
 

supton

Thread starter
Messages
18,168
Location
NH
Does your state have inspections?
Yep. Has to pass for 2 more years, darn it! After that it should be a "don't care". But until then, it needs to get fixed.

I have zero desire to work on this car. Don't know why but I don't like this vehicle. Didn't want it but it was given to us (will go to our oldest once he has a license) so I have to make the most of it. But since I didn't want it and don't like it, it's like pulling teeth to get myself to work on it. But. I don't know the shops in my area, so do I drive the half-hour to a shop that I've been using while hoping it's trivial? Hard life I know.
 
Messages
5,670
Location
Fort Worth, Texas
Good place to start.......


* Locate the Canister Vent Shut (CVS) valve on the side of the charcoal canister and the bypass solenoid under the cover next to the canister. Both solenoids have a Green/Yellow wire that supplies voltage to the solenoids. Also verify the hose from the purge solenoid is not restricted from the solenoid to the canister. On a CR-V, if people drive in the mud it can get in the line and restrict the vacuum supply to the canister.

* Verify that there is voltage to the solenoids, key on. If there is voltage to both solenoids, the second wire is the wire that the Engine Control Module (ECM) will ground to control the solenoid. On the CVS valve, backprobe the White/Red wire, ground it and verify that the valve will close and hold vacuum. Also verify that it will open when the ground is taken away.

* Test the bypass solenoid, Ground the Gray/Red wire and verify that the bypass solenoid will click and operate. If either solenoid fails, replace the solenoid and see if the code resets. If the solenoids pass and operate correctly, an Evaporative Emission Control System (EVAP) simulation test will need to be performed.

* To perform an EVAP simulation test, ground the CVS valve and the bypass solenoid at the same time. Put a voltmeter on the Fuel Tank Pressure (FTP) sensor Green (GRN) wire and then start the vehicle, Tap/backprobe a ground on the purge solenoid and draw vacuum on the system. Wait until the pressure sensor reads 1-1.5 volts and then stop. If the voltage does not go up, there are no leaks. If the voltage increases, look for a leak in the system. If the voltage increases when performing this test, clamp the hose from the 2-way valve to the fuel tank, if voltage no longer rises, there is a leak on the tank side. Normal FTP sensor voltage is 2.5 volts no vacuum or pressure in the system.

*********The bypass solenoid and 2-way valve are one part********

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supton

Thread starter
Messages
18,168
Location
NH
Gave in and took it to a shop--I tried to backprobe the connectors and realized I didn't have anything do that with, plus I just didn't feel like messing with this, outside my scope of knowledge plus busy with other things. Am told it was the 2 way bypass valve and the cannister shutoff. Hopefully that takes care of it.
 
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