Oz Iron Ore trains

Status
Not open for further replies.
Joined
Dec 12, 2002
Messages
43,889
Location
'Stralia
The locomotives are powered by a GE Evolution Series V-12 (GEVO-12) four stroke diesel, with 15.7 liters displacement per cylinder (total displacement 188.4 liters). They make 4,400 hp at 1,050 rpm, with a lube oil capacity of 450 gallons.

Here's a video of one of these locomotives being load-tested:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ga5G9C65uQ0
 
Originally Posted By: Mike242GT
The locomotives are powered by a GE Evolution Series V-12 (GEVO-12) four stroke diesel, with 15.7 liters displacement per cylinder (total displacement 188.4 liters). They make 4,400 hp at 1,050 rpm, with a lube oil capacity of 450 gallons.

Here's a video of one of these locomotives being load-tested:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ga5G9C65uQ0



Yup, but its a special variant with a CW6000AC frame which was intended for a larger 6000hp engine. The longer frame allows a larger radiator section to handle the high heat of the outback.
:p
 
Originally Posted By: Colt45ws
Originally Posted By: Mike242GT
The locomotives are powered by a GE Evolution Series V-12 (GEVO-12) four stroke diesel, with 15.7 liters displacement per cylinder (total displacement 188.4 liters). They make 4,400 hp at 1,050 rpm, with a lube oil capacity of 450 gallons.

Here's a video of one of these locomotives being load-tested:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ga5G9C65uQ0



Yup, but its a special variant with a CW6000AC frame which was intended for a larger 6000hp engine. The longer frame allows a larger radiator section to handle the high heat of the outback.
:p

A true railfan never lets anything get past him. Ever.
 
Originally Posted By: L_Sludger
Originally Posted By: Colt45ws
Originally Posted By: Mike242GT
The locomotives are powered by a GE Evolution Series V-12 (GEVO-12) four stroke diesel, with 15.7 liters displacement per cylinder (total displacement 188.4 liters). They make 4,400 hp at 1,050 rpm, with a lube oil capacity of 450 gallons.

Here's a video of one of these locomotives being load-tested:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ga5G9C65uQ0



Yup, but its a special variant with a CW6000AC frame which was intended for a larger 6000hp engine. The longer frame allows a larger radiator section to handle the high heat of the outback.
:p

A true railfan never lets anything get past him. Ever.

Hahahaha. Like a year ago I knew very little about locos. Then one day I was on Youtube searching for videos of something, probably detroit 2-strokes as that seems likely, and came across a video of an EMD starting.
It was a downward spiral from there. 0/10 do not recommend.
 
A long time ago my professor talked about the OZ iron ore trains. He said the tracks ran through some of most long and boring terrain - nothing but desert. It was so boring the trains had a feature where the engineer had to press a button every minute or so, or the train would stop running.
 
Originally Posted By: Kestas
A long time ago my professor talked about the OZ iron ore trains. He said the tracks ran through some of most long and boring terrain - nothing but desert. It was so boring the trains had a feature where the engineer had to press a button every minute or so, or the train would stop running.


they'd be on $200k to do that too, no jokes.
 
Originally Posted By: crinkles
Originally Posted By: Kestas
A long time ago my professor talked about the OZ iron ore trains. He said the tracks ran through some of most long and boring terrain - nothing but desert. It was so boring the trains had a feature where the engineer had to press a button every minute or so, or the train would stop running.


they'd be on $200k to do that too, no jokes.


Know a bloke who was a paramedic stationed along the train lines. Paid similarly to be close to the action (100km or so) if something happened...99.99999% of nothing, but there fly in fly out Justin Case.

They are being replaced with "drone" pilot commuters in Perth even as we speak...people go to work at a desk, and pilot mining equipment remotely, then return to their home at end of shift, rather than fly in fly out.

US military are finding that flying drones 8 hours a day is even more sleepworthy than doing it in the real.
 
Status
Not open for further replies.
Back
Top