ONE FOR THE BOOKS

Messages
421
Location
LUBBOCK, TX
I just talked to a guy Saturday that owned a 94 Ford F150. This truck has 250K + miles with no work being done to the engine internals. The only oil he has used is Quakerstate straight 30W. Does this make anybody wonder about thicker oils being better. He lives here in Texas on the high plains? Winter temps sometimes get below 0 degrees F. [I dont know]
 
Messages
706
Location
Boynton Beach FL.
[Roll Eyes] Long before they had or used multi weight oil we used 30 wt or straight weights. Your oil filter will allow the pressure to build rather quickly so it shouldn't hurt anything. A + is less additives.
 
Assuming you have a reasonable OCI, I'm really not clear on how much you can influence engine wear with different oils. There's UOA data, that indicates one oil may, for example, have twice the wear metals of another oil, but the relationship between those figures, and actual engine longevity seems pretty soft. If anyone on this board hits the lotto, please promise to buy a dozen Ford Focuses, and answer this question, okay?
 
Messages
275
Location
High Up in the Rockies
I wouldn't stay that straigh weights are better just because his truck has 250k on it. Most ford engines are good and if maintained can easily hit this mark, ours did as well on a diet of M1 since 2,500 miles. DEWFPO
 
Messages
3,705
Location
Chattanooga, TN
quote:
Originally posted by mountainhouse: [QB] There's UOA data, that indicates one oil may, for example, have twice the wear metals of another oil, but the relationship between those figures, and actual engine longevity seems pretty soft. /QB]
Amen!
 
Messages
772
Location
Ohio
quote:
There's UOA data, that indicates one oil may, for example, have twice the wear metals of another oil, but the relationship between those figures, and actual engine longevity seems pretty soft.
If the relationship is truly soft, or insignificant, comparing oil analyses between engines, even the same engine, with the intention of increasing engine life are essentially meaningless. The millions of high mileage vehicles that have used many different oils, both dino and synthetic, with few major engine problems would also seem to support the quoted statement. The common denominator in those engines are typically driving habits and maintenance/care/OCI, not the choice of oil or oil filter. Oil analysis would seem to be a good tool to give early indications of engine problems (coolant leaks, vacuum leaks, etc.), and also appears to be a good tool for establishing OCIs. However, it may not be a good tool to evaluate a given oil’s ability to maximize longevity of engines.
 
Messages
170
Location
Houston, Texas
I have 2 cars in my family that fit that catagory... 1972 Chevy Monte Carlo, 350cuin with over 300K before rebuild 1987 Chevy Suburban, 350cuin with over 380K and still going strong (recently sold to a close family friend) Both of these engines survived on straight 30wt and Detuch filters for their entire lifetime. Even more facinating is how hard they have been run during that time.
 

KW

Messages
1,686
Location
Central Arkansas
There is nothing wrong with straight 30 and 40 weight detergent oils as long as it is used in warmer temps. They are not loaded up with polymers and stuff that is not needed in warm weather. That's why they are used in lawn equipment.
 
Messages
7,409
Location
Austin, TX
quote:
Originally posted by Spector:
quote:
Originally posted by mountainhouse: [QB] There's UOA data, that indicates one oil may, for example, have twice the wear metals of another oil, but the relationship between those figures, and actual engine longevity seems pretty soft. /QB]
Amen!

I see your Amen, and raise you an additional Amen. [Big Grin]
 
Messages
43
Location
NY
Both of you guys with the straight 30 weight oils live in Texas. If I used straight 30 weight in my modular Ford V8 through a northen NY winter where the temps can hit -30 F it probably wouldn't last too long. There's a time and place for just about every oil. Not every oil is suited for every time and place.
 
Messages
7,409
Location
Austin, TX
quote:
Originally posted by Bdiddy: There's a time and place for just about every oil. Not every oil is suited for every time and place.
This has to be the quote of the week. It gets my vote, at least. [Cheers!]
 
Messages
542
Location
South Central Texas
I think there are too many variables to think about, regarding vehicles attaining high mileages. Are the vehicles warmed up, before driven on cold days, and are they driven on long trips aas opposed to stop and go? Are they driven only on paved roads, or only on dusty dirt roads? Two identical vehicles driven the same way will have different maintenance needs. This reminds me of a joke. An old guy bragging about how he had this old, old axe. He replaced the handle 12 times, and the head 3 times, but other than that, it was the same old axe. I have heard people brag about their old car running so long, only needing two new engines, 3 new transmissions, and a new rear differential, but other than that still the same car. Anyway, dont want to offend. I just feel some vehicles are luckier than others to achieve high mileage with minimal maintenence.
 
Messages
555
Location
south texas border
Maja, as you may be aware, a truck here in texas is identified by the cab and the included vin number plate. where the rest of the truck came from or how often its been replaced don't matter [Big Grin]
 
Messages
555
Location
south texas border
94 f150 would either be a 302 or 351 i would think. Either engine should have no problems seeing 2-300k of service. I had a 92 302 f150 manual called for 10w30. South texas old school is run straight 30 winter and straight 40 summer. For down here it seems to work fine. Personally I'm using 5w20. [Cheers!]
 
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