Old Campstove Propane

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I found in the garage a partially used small propane cylinder (circa late 90s) and the Coleman camp stove it was used for. I have no desire to use either one but do not know what I could do to safely dispose of this fuel. Think maybe the local volunteer fire dept. would be a place to start? Thanks for any assistance.
 
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Our local solid waste disposal place aka "dump" takes propane bottles and cylinders.

Bet it you left the stove and fuel on the curb, though, it would save you a trip.
 
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I found in the garage a partially used small propane cylinder (circa late 90s) and the Coleman camp stove it was used for. I have no desire to use either one but do not know what I could do to safely dispose of this fuel. Think maybe the local volunteer fire dept. would be a place to start? Thanks for any assistance.
Sell it on CraigsList?
IMO: Best way to dispose of that fuel is for somebody to use it as it was intended.
 

GrtArtiste

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My initial thought was to use the stove to try and vent the fuel without lighting it....approx 0.5 pound of fuel. Again...concerned about safety. The back of my back yard is about 60-70 feet behind my house and much further the the other nearby houses and the road.
 
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Those make a nice emergency stove. I would keep it or give to someone.
 

GrtArtiste

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Those make a nice emergency stove. I would keep it or give to someone.
I don't know how I could be sure that the fittings and valves on the stove would be safe to use after sitting unused in a dusty, unheated garage for so long. I thought about throwing it away for that reason. Thanks for your suggestion.
 
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Those older Coleman stoves are well built and many people want them. Post a FB add or something. I usually list stuff I dont want for $10. Then the first person that’s not a PIA and shows up I just let them have it.

Every time I list stuff for free I have 218 people asking a million questions and nobody showing up. If I list it for $10, more times than not the first person to contact me actually comes to inspect it. They almost always take the item home for free.

One time I had a inflatable kids “water park” type thing I put out by the road for free. Some lady came and picked it up. 2 days later she dumped it back in my yard when I wasn’t home. It annoyed me so I dont put stuff out by the road anymore.
 
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My understanding is that there's only one manufacturer (Worthington Industries) of those 1 lb disposable cylinders. Doesn't matter what the brand is, although Coleman is obviously the biggest seller.

I don't really know of any way to properly recycle them in most areas. I think maybe a hazardous waste pickup/dropoff. Obviously many campgrounds have recycling bins for them, but I've seen them overflowing. My home recycling can't handle them. Coleman used to include these little "Green Key" things that were supposed to demonstrate that they were completely emptied by opening the valve. However, I heard that it didn't go anywhere because there wasn't a lot of understanding of what they did. Apparently Maricopa County, AZ recognized what they were an integrated it into their recycling program.

DEERFOOT-260421-105235.JPG



Disposal-Instructions-for-Coleman-Propane-Cylinders---Green-Key-PDF




There are compatible refillable versions. There's an upfront cost and refills vary too. I've heard of some sellers that refill for free for those with some sort of membership scheme.
 
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I don't know how I could be sure that the fittings and valves on the stove would be safe to use after sitting unused in a dusty, unheated garage for so long. I thought about throwing it away for that reason. Thanks for your suggestion.


There is one way to find out. Hook it up with the valves closed and smell for propane. Before that I’m sure you can remove the burner parts and check for insects or whatever. If the valve knobs turn easily I would think you are in good shape.

Those stoves are pretty simple. We had a two burner Coleman-like stove for a number of years that we kept in the garage. It came in handy during a couple of winter storms after sitting for a long period.
 

CleanSump

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Most counties have hazardous household waste disposal sites. Google it up for your county.
I have taken empties there with other stuff, like oil paint and bug sprays.
They aren't allowed in trash in most of the US.
Screw it into the stove away from the house a bit. It won't explode or anything, nor give you cancer or make your sterile if you get a whiff. If it leaks, it leaks = empty container. BUT you are still supposed to take the empty container to the hazardous waste disposal site.
 
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