oil/water seperation time

Messages
6,388
Location
Washington St.
Detergent oil doesn't separate the water out readily. You'll need to drain everything to get the moisture out. Is that creamy colored goo any problem in the usual small amounts that show up every winter? Ken
 
Messages
661
Location
Ottawa, Ont CANADA
If there is any problems..?? I would have to say -no- . Like you said -every winter- . The constant hot-cold cycle, coupled with less than 5km trips cant help... I JUST did an oil change M1 5w30, I mean 1 week ago. I looked under the cap, when I checked the oil level last .. and sludge was already there.. [Eek!] So I thinking of trying to eleminate some of the water in a little while. Jean
 

Jay

Messages
1,607
Location
Idaho Falls, ID
Water can be emulsified in oil. That is, water can be churned into globules so small that they won't separate out of the oil. Water greatly promotes oxidation and greatly weakens the strength of the lubricating film. You should try to get the oil hot enough to drive the moisture out periodically.
 
Messages
157
Location
Roseville, MI
If you changed the oil one week ago and you can already see water in the oil, it may be reason for concern. How many miles? Could the water be coolant? Jason
 
Messages
661
Location
Ottawa, Ont CANADA
'98 Pontiac Transport with 85,000 km on it... no tell-tale white smoke from the exhaust, other than regular condesation exhaust at an outside temp of -20. As mentioned above only in the winter..... [ January 31, 2003, 03:46 PM: Message edited by: 2K2AcuraTL ]
 
Messages
661
Location
Ottawa, Ont CANADA
The evidence of water/moisture in the oil is presently manifesting itself with this cream sludge under the oil cap. Probably due to all the short driving distances I do.. If I were to put the car on ramps after a short drive, what would be your best guess at the time it would take for the water to settle at the bottom of the sump, so I can drain a little oil off and top up. Thanks Jean
 
Messages
3,317
Location
Bolivia
You need to get the engine hot. Engine oils have emulsifiers to intentionally absorb the moisture so it can evaporate and disappear. Hydraulic oils have demulsifiers that separate the water to the bottom so it can be drained off. Once a week you should go for a nice drive or take the long way home. You might also make sure your thermostat is closing properly when the engine is cold.
 
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