Oil for a hard working Hemi

Messages
254
Location
Noblesville, IN
From what we have seen if you do just cam and lifters there is a high chance it will come back with engine failure shortly after. But of course customer will raise hell when you tell them it needs and engine for a simple lifter cam job in their eyes

you just have to tell them it needs this and let them make the choice
 
Messages
1,938
Location
Muncie, Indiana
As far as I know the only Rotella T6 that's 5W30 is Rotella T6 Multi-Vehicle which is a modern dual rated oil which is constrained to the API SN limits for phosphorous it should cause no harm to your cats more so than any other SN PCMO, I believe Shell introduced it after they began removing the dual ratings from all of their HDEO offerings because they exceeded the phosphorous limits and they agreed with the API that HDEOs should no longer allowed to exceed the limits if they are dual rated.
 
Messages
847
Location
Alaska and Wisconsin
As far as I know the only Rotella T6 that's 5W30 is Rotella T6 Multi-Vehicle which is a modern dual rated oil which is constrained to the API SN limits for phosphorous it should cause no harm to your cats more so than any other SN PCMO, I believe Shell introduced it after they began removing the dual ratings from all of their HDEO offerings because they exceeded the phosphorous limits and they agreed with the API that HDEOs should no longer allowed to exceed the limits if they are dual rated.
That Rotella Multi-Vehicle 5W-30 is outstanding oil.

If memory serves me correctly, Multi-Vehicle 5W-30 has an HTHS of 3.5.

How one could find a better towing option 5W-30 oil, IDK!
 
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Messages
708
It's bad QC on the lifters, seems to be the general conclusion. GM has been plagued with the same issue, guess this can happen when you outsource/offshore your lifter manufacturing. I assume they likely share a supplier (FCA and GM). I think both have had several revisions at this point, supposedly they are "fixed" now, but that's been the case several times over.

The vast majority of the engines never experience the failure, but the main difference is that with the GM engines, the cam is often saveable, since it uses a billet core, whereas with the HEMI cams being SADI, the cam is usually a write-off too.
Yes that's basically what I've read on the subject.
 
Messages
708
One other difference besides camshafts not typically failing is it doesn't seem like the gm LS engine's are prone to failing if you fix the bad lifter.
Personally I run M1 0w40 FS in my 2005 Silverado and it's not worked nearly as hard as the OP's Hemi, but it has 200k and I want 400k out of it or more. It's also among the years that could potentially have a lifter failure. My friends 2004 5.3 had a lifter fail at around 250k but his previous truck a 2000 4.8 went 420k miles without any issues.
 

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Messages
46,199
Location
Ontario, Canada
One other difference besides camshafts not typically failing is it doesn't seem like the gm LS engine's are prone to failing if you fix the bad lifter.
Personally I run M1 0w40 FS in my 2005 Silverado and it's not worked nearly as hard as the OP's Hemi, but it has 200k and I want 400k out of it or more. It's also among the years that could potentially have a lifter failure. My friends 2004 5.3 had a lifter fail at around 250k but his previous truck a 2000 4.8 went 420k miles without any issues.
We have a group of HEMI's at work (I know I posted this before, so I apologize for the redundant contribution) that are all at around 200,000 miles and we've had one where it had lifter failure, the others are all fine. The one with lifter failure was sold privately to a party that knew it needed an engine. Some of the other trucks have higher mileage than it did. Every single one of them has needed the exhaust manifold studs done.
 
Messages
254
Location
Noblesville, IN
One other difference besides camshafts not typically failing is it doesn't seem like the gm LS engine's are prone to failing if you fix the bad lifter.
Personally I run M1 0w40 FS in my 2005 Silverado and it's not worked nearly as hard as the OP's Hemi, but it has 200k and I want 400k out of it or more. It's also among the years that could potentially have a lifter failure. My friends 2004 5.3 had a lifter fail at around 250k but his previous truck a 2000 4.8 went 420k miles without any issues.
Right it doesn’t have all the metal in the engine from camshaft
 
Messages
424
Location
Owego, New York
I was just talking to the owner of the forming company yesterday (pulled up next to me in his 14ish ram) and it had a pretty significant lifter tap (did not sound like exhaust manifold). I do not know about the maintenance history but judging by the age and condition of several of their other vehicles (a mid 90s Cummins flat bed in mint condition) I'd guess it's good.

My understanding on this cam and lifter issue is bad quality parts. Some last and some don't.
I saw a vid stating the issues were primarily in fleet vehicles over 150k that saw a lot of idle time. Poor lubrication at idle. Posted by a man who claimed to be a mechanic. Not stating this as fact, just sharing information.
 
Messages
34
Personally, I would recommend Valvoline full synthetic 5W-30.
And if your around a hundred thousand miles or so, go for the high mileage.
That's just my preference though. Good luck with whatever you choose!
 
Messages
2,765
Location
Caldwell Idaho
Have you considered Pennzoil Ultra SRT 0W40? I would follow the Owner's Manual. The most wear occurs at start up. According to BITOG and related studies. Amsoil makes stout oil. Redline is another one. It's polar! Best of luck sir and welcome!
Most of the occurs during the engines warm up cycle until the engine is at a stabilized operating temp.
 
Messages
2,012
Location
Crawfordville FL
Most of the occurs during the engines warm up cycle until the engine is at a stabilized operating temp.
Specifically from about 40-80C.

When cold the oil is thick and everything is in hydrodynamic lubrication, which is good because the additives don't start activating until 60-70C (I don't remember the exact temp). When the oil is up at operating temp, it's thinned out AND all the additives are activated so you have optimal protection.

The max wear zone is when the oil has thinned enough to allow boundary lubrication regimes but the additive pack hasn't activated completely. So you have metal on metal before your ZDDP is ready to sacrifice itself for the cause.
 
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