Oil filter PARTICLE COUNT tests

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For my next motor oil change, I'll be getting a particle count of the Toyota / Denso OEM YZZF1 oil filter, so I can compare it to a particulate count of the oversized Mobil 1 209 filter, which will replace my Denso YZZF1. I like using Blackstone for motor oil UOAs because they provide a high quality service at a good price, but I understand their particulate count test isn't quite as good and accurate as the particulate count tests performed by some other companies. I'll be sending my used motor oil to Blackstone, as usual, but what company can I use for a better particulate count test?
 
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Even Polaris feels that the pore blockage test is the best for determining filter efficiency. The problem is the opaque nature that is typical with used oil. They already employ dilution factors to the optical laser samples that lowers the accuracy of the process. Additional dilution to meet the translucency requirements would multiply that error factor. ..but I imagine if your used oil is still translucent (some virgin oils are quite dark), that it could work.
 

Built_Well

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 Originally Posted By: Gary Allan
Even Polaris feels that the pore blockage test is the best for determining filter efficiency.
Well, Gary, I dunno. There's a 2.5-year-old sticky in the Bypass Filters forum posted by Arkapigdiesel that seems to favor "particle counting with the ISO 11171 method" to obtain "an authentic ISO 4406:99 cleanliness code count of 4,6, 14 microns." The author ends by saying he "will leave the 'pore blockage' and 'mathmatical' conjecture to others." Of course, Arkapigdiesel was having oil analyzed from an engine cleaned by a bypass filter, so the oil probably wasn't as dirty and opaque as engine oil which is cleaned by just a full-flow filter, but the post still does bring up the question as to which method is better for particle counting (even for full-flow sytems): the laser or the pore blockage method. Here's a link to the interesting BITOG sticky, which also mentions BITOG poster "SW Heat": http://www.bobistheoilguy.com/forums/ubbthreads.php?ubb=showflat&Number=785788#Post785788
 
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Well, I won't dispute what anyone says about anything. I merely state the obvious. Used motor oil is not commonly subjected to optical laser particle counting. Machinery ..or anything not subjected to combustion, can be. I guess in the process of ferrography, one could wash away all the oil, replace it with a lab standard clean oil, and do the optical particle count. I don't have a dog in either fight
 
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