New oil with no Zinc or Phosphorus

MolaKule

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Originally Posted by tundraotto
Fuchs!!!!
Yes, I believe that is the one. Apparently the new Chevron Delo 600 ADF is a "Low Ash" not an ashless oil; there is a difference. smile
 
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110
Location
SC
Originally Posted by dnewton3
If I am understanding correctly, the differences are thus: - SA is an issue in that the residuals can attack the susceptible elements in the cat converter, primarily. But the new low=SAPs lube of discussion in this thread clearly talks to regen issues as well. Additionally with very low (zero?) Ca and Mg and such, there's a very low base number; issues with acids and some bearings, as stated above. (All the more reason to have sealed crankcases and make sure you don't short trip the drive cycles). - Soot is an issue in that higher concentrations cause more frequent regen cycles, as well as eventually may (will?) require cleaning or replacement of the DPF? And there's some evidence that FBCs can alter this concern in a positive manner. As a summary, do I have all that right?
I think what you're missing is that ash doesn't have anything to do with regens. Regens remove soot. The ash remains. Eventually it builds up to the point of causing obstruction and requires either a cleaning or replacement of the DPF. What I'm saying is that this oil has little to do with regen frequency but a lot to do with service life of the DPF. DPF is good for over 100k miles and often much longer. But... replacement is a few thousand dollars. That's the impact and what is being addressed by this oil, as I understand it.
 
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Alaska and Wisconsin
Originally Posted by SavagePatch
Full disclosure: I'll be running this next summer's towing season because I'm a sucker for new oils. That said, 1) Does the "significantly reduced DPF clogging" mean that it results in less regens? 2) What's the normal expected service life of a DPF? I need to know so I can fill in x. X•2.5=New Expected Service Life 3) What the heck is synthetic technology? (rhetorical question, don't answer) All questions are asked with a modern diesel pick-up truck in mind. P.S. I walked in to an AutoZone this morning and walked out without buying any of their clearance items! Big deal for me because an oil stash doesn't work well when you're always itching to try the next newest thing. [Linked Image]
Chevron's forward example here, along with GM's newest diesel technology example -- the 2020 3.0L in-line 6-cyl diesel for their light-duty trucks -- will greatly further the modern diesel engine's exhaust mitigation, economy and performance fine-tuning. The following 3L Duramax technical review is quite revealing:
As an RF engineer, I like the fact this engineer actually mentioned a "quarter-wave tuner," acting as "matching device" and as a filter. Moreover, I like this engineer's forthrightness. It's obvious through the influences of this guy's engineering team, that GM is remaining grounded and realistic concerning the new engine's capabilities. They have made this engine's limitations known -- up front. They have realistically conveyed its design goals: decent performance with outstanding economy. I want one of these. It'll likely be my next new truck. smile
 
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853
Location
Alaska and Wisconsin
Originally Posted by demarpaint
Originally Posted by Gokhan
Looking at the article I posted: 0.2% SA test oil: near total failure, failing most OEM engine tests 0.3% SA test oil: fails Sequence IVA valvetrain wear for gasoline engines 0.4% SA test oil: 65 µm (fail limit: 90 µm) on the Sequence IVA valvetrain wear test for gasoline engines -- a poor number for an HDEO 0.4% SA test oil: copper corrosion and wear is near fail (the first attempt failed, and then they added a copper-corrosion inhibitor) 0.4% SA test oil: engine deposits near fail (don't expect this HDEO to clean your engine)
If I understand this correctly it is not an oil I'd want in my engine.
New oil such as this will be specified accordingly. We will see soon enough who specifies this oil. Obviously, Chevron didn't develop this in a vacuum. It has applications as coordinated w/ mfgrs.
 
Messages
110
Location
SC
Originally Posted by SteveG4
Originally Posted by demarpaint
Originally Posted by Gokhan
Looking at the article I posted: 0.2% SA test oil: near total failure, failing most OEM engine tests 0.3% SA test oil: fails Sequence IVA valvetrain wear for gasoline engines 0.4% SA test oil: 65 µm (fail limit: 90 µm) on the Sequence IVA valvetrain wear test for gasoline engines -- a poor number for an HDEO 0.4% SA test oil: copper corrosion and wear is near fail (the first attempt failed, and then they added a copper-corrosion inhibitor) 0.4% SA test oil: engine deposits near fail (don't expect this HDEO to clean your engine)
If I understand this correctly it is not an oil I'd want in my engine.
New oil such as this will be specified accordingly. We will see soon enough who specifies this oil. Obviously, Chevron didn't develop this in a vacuum. It has applications as coordinated w/ mfgrs.
I'm going to guess NOT Ford.
 
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1,871
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South Carolina
I'm not really onboard with the whole low ash deal. The oil that's in my Tahoe is 1.8% SA, an add pack designed by Les Rudnick, but it also doesn't have cats.
 
Messages
853
Location
Alaska and Wisconsin
Originally Posted by SteveG4
Originally Posted by SavagePatch
Full disclosure: I'll be running this next summer's towing season because I'm a sucker for new oils. That said, 1) Does the "significantly reduced DPF clogging" mean that it results in less regens? 2) What's the normal expected service life of a DPF? I need to know so I can fill in x. X•2.5=New Expected Service Life 3) What the heck is synthetic technology? (rhetorical question, don't answer) All questions are asked with a modern diesel pick-up truck in mind. P.S. I walked in to an AutoZone this morning and walked out without buying any of their clearance items! Big deal for me because an oil stash doesn't work well when you're always itching to try the next newest thing. [Linked Image]
Chevron's forward example here, along with GM's newest diesel technology example -- the 2020 3.0L in-line 6-cyl diesel for their light-duty trucks -- will greatly further the modern diesel engine's exhaust mitigation, economy and performance fine-tuning. The following 3L Duramax technical review is quite revealing:
As an RF engineer, I like the fact this engineer actually mentioned a "quarter-wave tuner," acting as "matching device" and as a filter. Moreover, I like this engineer's forthrightness. It's obvious through the influences of this guy's engineering team, that GM is remaining grounded and realistic concerning the new engine's capabilities. They have made this engine's limitations known -- up front. They have realistically conveyed its design goals: decent performance with outstanding economy. I want one of these. It'll likely be my next new truck. smile
After a bit of research, this new LD 3.0L GM diesel engine will use the correspondingly new "DexosD" approved oil. And, it appears this approved oil only comes in a 0W-20 viscosity! What is the world coming to this days? crazy It will NOT be using this new Chevron oil... New abounds this days. There's much to discover, review and learn.
 
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down in the park
Originally Posted by dnewton3
If I am understanding correctly, the differences are thus: - SA is an issue in that the residuals can attack the susceptible elements in the cat converter, primarily. But the new low=SAPs lube of discussion in this thread clearly talks to regen issues as well. Additionally with very low (zero?) Ca and Mg and such, there's a very low base number; issues with acids and some bearings, as stated above. (All the more reason to have sealed crankcases and make sure you don't short trip the drive cycles). - Soot is an issue in that higher concentrations cause more frequent regen cycles, as well as eventually may (will?) require cleaning or replacement of the DPF? And there's some evidence that FBCs can alter this concern in a positive manner. As a summary, do I have all that right?
I think what you're missing is that ash doesn't have anything to do with regens. Regens remove soot. The ash remains. Eventually it builds up to the point of causing obstruction and requires either a cleaning or replacement of the DPF. What I'm saying is that this oil has little to do with regen frequency but a lot to do with service life of the DPF. DPF is good for over 100k miles and often much longer. But... replacement is a few thousand dollars. That's the impact and what is being addressed by this oil, as I understand it.

The ash "might"remain. the pore size in the dpf is about 10 micron, soot particles are 40 to 50 micron size, and ash is 1 micron, but embedded in the soot most likely. Unless the ash clumps together to big particles exceeding 10 micron, ash loading is not a major concern
 
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