My first time not using quick struts because they're not available and Bilstein is. Questions

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2015 Forester

Since KYB quick struts are sold out everywhere, I'm going to use Bilstein rear shocks. Part number 24-278515

It comes with an aluminum spring seat that just sits on a circlip. It stays on the ring, but it rotates around and doesn't lock in place. Will it stay in place and not spin around once installed? Bilstein says 19 lb ft, while Subaru says 25. Is 20-25 lb ft on the top nut enough to hold this type of spring seat in place?

Also, when it comes to tightening the top nut, I notice there is also a hex key. Can you just torque it by the hex key and just use a regular combo wrench to hold it? I have hex sockets that I can use a torque wrench with. Or can I just torque it down with just a torque wrench and regular socket and not have to worry about the shaft spinning? Is there anything wrong with using the hex and shaft to tighten it down rather than the nut?

Subaru has some special tool made by Kent-Moore, but I don't know what it looks like or how to obtain it because it doesn't seem to be sold anywhere. The part number is 20399FG000 and is not listed on any Subaru parts site or any tool store or site.
 
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The ring will hold it, not an issue, it does not need to "lock" in place. The tool you reference is a deep socket with hex on the top.
Chances are if you try and torque it with the hex on the rod it may round out, you can use a spark plug socket that fits that have a hex IIRC its a 14mm. Something like this, it does not need to be Snap on quality for around 25 ft.lb.

Edit: Forgot the link, sorry.
 
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I also put a small dab of anti-seize on the strut rod thread. Easier to make sure its tight with that on there. You don't want to have the top nut not tight enough when using the hex wrench.
 
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Top nut on E 28 was 21mm or so. Hex on strut was 8mm . I used a 1/2 7/8 socket clamped in the jaws of a 9" Vise Grip. Used an 8mm Allen wrench a Got it snug enough Guess-timate 30 lbs :cool:
 
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The threads may be different... I would follow BNA specs.

The spring set is a total non-issue it is not going anywhere. Assemble it per BNA instructions and it will be perfectly fine...
 
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Subaru has some special tool made by Kent-Moore, but I don't know what it looks like or how to obtain it because it doesn't seem to be sold anywhere. The part number is 20399FG000 and is not listed on any Subaru parts site or any tool store or site.
Is this the tool?

 

slacktide_bitog

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The ring will hold it, not an issue, it does not need to "lock" in place. The tool you reference is a deep socket with hex on the top.
Chances are if you try and torque it with the hex on the rod it may round out, you can use a spark plug socket that fits that have a hex IIRC its a 14mm. Something like this, it does not need to be Snap on quality for around 25 ft.lb.

Edit: Forgot the link, sorry.

Thank you so much! :cool:

The nut Bilstein provides is 17mm, though the original Subaru nut might be 14mm. Therefore, I can take the grommet out of a spark plug socket I have and put it in a 17mm socket. (I have a few spark plug sockets for some reason LOL)


Is this the tool?


Yes, but when you actually click anything, you can't actually buy it :cry:
 

slacktide_bitog

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The threads may be different... I would follow BNA specs.

The spring set is a total non-issue it is not going anywhere. Assemble it per BNA instructions and it will be perfectly fine...

too late to edit the OP, but I misread the manual. Subaru's torque spec is in fact 25 Nm, which is 18.4 lb ft. I just quoted the wrong column :oops:

Subaru says 18.4
Bilstein says 19
so the same :)
 
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Many times you can get away with deep offset box wrench and a hex key. I wouldn't sweat the torque wrench for 18 ft.lb. Tighten it about as tight as an oil drain plug.
These are cheap junk but good enough for jobs like this if you can get on it.

 

slacktide_bitog

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I got one done due to taking more time than I thought it would. I might do the other one tomorrow or next week :unsure:

The spring compressor I used was OEM Tools #25550, which seems to be too big for the small diameter springs that come on the rear of many Japanese cars with a coilover shock setup. What is the best compressor to use for small springs? (please no $700 wall mount compressors :D)
 

slacktide_bitog

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Another update

I couldn't get the other shock done because the spring is broken! :poop:

So I will have to take it to the dealer to get the springs replaced as part of the recall. Hopefully they will also install my shock for free as part of the recall (because the labor is the exact same, and I already installed the other one)
 
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But will they install original OEM parts? It seems many Mercedes dealers will install an OEM Mercedes part even if you bought it elsewhere.
That is often a dealer by dealer decision. But since the dealer did not have an opportunity to make money on the part, your labor charge probably gets inflated.
And "we won't warranty the new spring, without a working(new) strut/shock installed with it."
Recalls usually do not carry a warranty.
 
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That is often a dealer by dealer decision. But since the dealer did not have an opportunity to make money on the part, your labor charge probably gets inflated.

Recalls usually do not carry a warranty.
I believe the way that trick works is that they quote a price on the job including labor and parts. You show up with the part later so it's too late for them to jack up the labor hours.
 
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