My BMW 335i F30 loves Redline 0w40

Status
Not open for further replies.
Joined
Sep 11, 2006
Messages
166
Location
Mississauga, Ontario
Hi Just wanted to drop in my seal of approval for this oil.Its AWESOME. It was more than just an informed decision. Researched the choice for a good 3 months or so. Reading forums, product data sheets, oil analysis reports, compared the oil composition,pour points,viscosity index,heck even read amazon reviews. Heck, even Mike Miller-BMW expert uses Redline in his BMWs. Why 0w40 and why not 5w30. I live in Canada and if you are smart you would never use a 5w oil here, It pains me to see people running 5w and even 10w in their cars here,foolishly. Most of the wear in engines occurs at startup and more so coldstartup, 0w oils in extreme cold temps can reach the narrow passages, more crucially turbochargers much much much earlier and provide lubrication. Last winter I noticed that with the Bmw 5w30 the starts were pretty rough, and at times i had to hold on the start button for a while longer as I heard the starter furiously trying to crank, hindered by the thick peanutbutter in the sump at -30. 2.Why not Redline 0w30, why 40 weight. Well, our engines run hot and it is my belief (you may disagree with me), it is cheaper for BMW to specify and stock fewer weights of oil. I mean comeon..think about it,, all models from 320i to the M cars would use the same oil, especially when there is so much difference in output? Also, turbo engines are hard on oil and 30weight oils shear out of grade soon. Also with Direct injection, fuel dilution is also a concern, especially in cold climates and/or short trips. therefore a 40 wieght oil provides a better safety margin Also, if you drive your car hard, or track always choose a thicker weight for more protection due to elevated oil temps. I drive my car the way its meant to be driven, hard. BUTT DYNO READINGS. 1) Smoother starts This is noticeable from the get go, engine is quieter on startup. 2) Their is much less hesitation initially, you know there is some slugisshness in the first few miles you drive, well, its gone. 3) There is also this eagerness to rev, the engines wants to rev, this is the most noticeable aspect after the switch. I am guessing it has to do with Redlines ester base. There is much less fluid friction as esters have uniform size molecules and the oil has great flow properties at all temperatures thus creating less drag on the crankshaft. 4) Engine is quieter at high speeds, this is very noticeable at any speeds above 130..140..km/hr. I had also recently swithced my differential fluids to Redline 75w90 (although noticed no difference)..no problems yet. I also plan to do an ATF drain and refill with Redline D6 and Lubeguard Platnium additive, will provide a review. The Catch Well Redline oils are not BMW-LL-01 certified. Redline recommends its 5w30,0w40 and even 0w30 for our engines. My car is CPO but I took a leap of faith and got rewarded, my car loves it. I plan to do uoas and keep this thread updated. Question..I dont know where I read.. the initial UOAs of Redline are never stellar, it takes a few intervals for Redline to establish it chemistry and deliver excellent numbers, is that correct? Also should I expect the first switch to Redline will cause a slight spike in oil consumption,and that it would go away soon? One of the times I wish i had a dipstick.
 
  • Like
Reactions: a5m
Joined
Feb 6, 2014
Messages
3,897
Location
Canada
Not Surprised, On my BMW in the sig, I also noticed a change when going from the PO's diet of M1 15w50 to Mobil Delvac 1 5w40. Considering it's always been a summer only car, everyone on the BMW boards said I was crazy. Even on summer mornings the engine would crank over faster and revved far easier than on the 15w50.
 
Joined
Oct 30, 2002
Messages
41,949
Location
Great Lakes
Some of your statements are questionable at best, but I'm glad you chose your oil. We all use somewhat subjective logic to arrive at our oil choice. smile
 
Joined
Jul 22, 2015
Messages
3,768
Location
MD
Good for you. I posted last week that there ain't a spit difference between Amsoil signature 0w20 and 5w20 unless you live in the Arctic and its minimum... Except the Noack on the 5w20 is superior.
 

rikstaker

Thread starter
Joined
Sep 11, 2006
Messages
166
Location
Mississauga, Ontario
Thanks for the input guys. i think you guys dont realize how cold it can get here. I remember once in Saskatchewan, on a -45 night, I got on the highway after warming up the engine and let the coolant temperature gauage climb up to 25%, on the highway and the frigid cold hitting the front of the engine made the guage drop to 0!!.. I took the off ramp and took the street.So yes..0w makes a difference up here
 
  • Like
Reactions: a5m
Joined
Jan 4, 2006
Messages
1,601
Location
GA
While I think Redline products are good, if your transmission is the ZF 8 speed automatic, I would use the ZF recommended fluid here (Lifeguard 8). It has been tested and provides good results in that transmission. If it has the French GM transmission (not sure if these were used in the F30 cars, but they are in the E90 cars), then Redline fluid would be fine and recommended. Nice car, by the way. I'm sure it's a lot of fun to drive. Enjoy!
 

OVERKILL

$100 Site Donor 2021
Joined
Apr 28, 2008
Messages
53,969
Location
Ontario, Canada
Originally Posted By: rikstaker
Thanks for the input guys. i think you guys dont realize how cold it can get here. I remember once in Saskatchewan, on a -45 night, I got on the highway after warming up the engine and let the coolant temperature gauage climb up to 25%, on the highway and the frigid cold hitting the front of the engine made the guage drop to 0!!.. I took the off ramp and took the street.So yes..0w makes a difference up here
But it doesn't get that cold in SW Ontario. Maybe "with windchill" (which your engine doesn't feel) but I don't recall it being anywhere near that cold in quite a long time. In Edmonton or Winterpeg sure, but not in our area. Usually around -30C is the lowest we see. I'm a HUGE advocate of running a 0w-xx oil in the winter months but the reality is that there are very few days in the winter when it is actually bordering on necessary. BTW, regarding your temp gauge experience, I had similar fun with my 2001 M5. It had a hard time getting up to temp in the winter and would shed heat like crazy. This was reflected in oil temperature as well. I blame it at least in part on the huge mechanical clutch fan. My wife's Charger (the '06) which is my current winter ride only has an electric fan, and it comes up to temp like a champion, even when it is -30C. Comically, a few years ago we were driving our Expedition back from Nova Scotia and it was an honest -30C and colder. I stopped in at McDonalds to grab a coffee and as I'm sitting there I watch the temp gauge slowly creep down below the operational temp mark. Once back on the highway and under load, it went back to where it normally was. Was rather comical to observe.
 
Joined
Apr 27, 2012
Messages
13,462
Location
MA
You should get a UOA and then compare it to Mobil 1 0w40 or Castrol 0w40. I believe they both meet the BMW spec. Usually when some oil does, like a small boutique oil like Redline, it's usually because they don't want to pay the fee or the license to get it approved.
 
Joined
Oct 30, 2002
Messages
41,949
Location
Great Lakes
Originally Posted By: Wolf359
You should get a UOA and then compare it to Mobil 1 0w40 or Castrol 0w40.
If only a UOA was good for this sort of stuff...
 
Joined
Oct 4, 2012
Messages
1,342
Location
Rabbit Creek, Alaska
Originally Posted By: rikstaker
Thanks for the input guys. i think you guys dont realize how cold it can get here. I remember once in Saskatchewan, on a -45 night, I got on the highway after warming up the engine and let the coolant temperature gauage climb up to 25%, on the highway and the frigid cold hitting the front of the engine made the guage drop to 0!!.. I took the off ramp and took the street.So yes..0w makes a difference up here
Meh, I'm at 62 degrees latitude(20 more than you and with colder temperatures) and I can say 0w weights aren't necessary. Most 5ws are perfectly fine. Lots of people buy whatever conventional 5w30 is on sale and just truck along not knowing any better. Plug in with a block heater if it's very cold and make sure your starter and charging system are in great shape. Those things mean more in the winter than the most expensive 0w oil you can order.
 
Joined
Oct 30, 2002
Messages
41,949
Location
Great Lakes
Originally Posted By: Jetronic
Originally Posted By: Ramblejam
"Thick peanut butter?" Hmm...
The pumping viscosity isn't measured in centiPoise, the table is wrong.
Then what is it measured in?
 

OVERKILL

$100 Site Donor 2021
Joined
Apr 28, 2008
Messages
53,969
Location
Ontario, Canada
Originally Posted By: Jetronic
Originally Posted By: Ramblejam
"Thick peanut butter?" Hmm...
The pumping viscosity isn't measured in centiPoise, the table is wrong.
You may want to argue that with Mobil: shrug
 
Joined
Feb 27, 2009
Messages
8,089
Location
down in the park
No, you(re correct, I'm wrong. I got confused by the shear viscosities being expressed in cP, (CCS and HTHS), and no shear viscosities in cSt (KV40, KV100 and -incorrectly- MRV)
 
Joined
Dec 5, 2009
Messages
28,049
Location
Regina, Saskatchewan, Canada
Originally Posted By: rikstaker
I live in Canada and if you are smart you would never use a 5w oil here, It pains me to see people running 5w and even 10w in their cars here,foolishly.
While I'd be cautious with a 10w-XX, a 5w-XX works just fine in most conditions one will encounter in Canada, including Saskatchewan winters. That's not to say there's something wrong with choosing a 0w-XX option, but there are many people using 5w-30 conventional in Canada with the blessing of the OEM, with the engine still outlasting everything else on the vehicle. If someone is, however, doing a lot of unaided starts in a brutally cold area during a really cold spell, and has to really rely on their car, I'd suggest they choose more carefully. Personally, I have a heated garage these days, and am not afraid of using an oil pan heater, either, not to mention the block heater. Of course, when using a synthetic, there is something to be said for choosing the most suitable grade for the winter, and I'd tend to prefer something like, for example, Castrol 0w-40 A3/B4 and 0w-30 A3/B4 over their 5w-40 A3/B4 option.
 
Joined
Mar 8, 2012
Messages
17,041
Location
Colorado Springs
Originally Posted By: rikstaker
Thanks for the input guys. i think you guys dont realize how cold it can get here. I remember once in Saskatchewan, on a -45 night, I got on the highway after warming up the engine and let the coolant temperature gauage climb up to 25%, on the highway and the frigid cold hitting the front of the engine made the guage drop to 0!!.. I took the off ramp and took the street.So yes..0w makes a difference up here
Well, there are people of various backgrounds here. I for example skied on -42c in Bosnia. So, several things about Redline 0W40. 1. I would personally also run 0W oil in that climate. However, I am not so sure about number after W that is doing any favor to you. I think personally in that kind of climate during the winter, Castrol 0W30 would do much better job. You are running actually very thick W40 oil on operating temperature. That oil will need more time to warm up then Castrol 0W30, which has also pour point of -60 like Redline. I think you are taking hit on MPG, and if you run car hard oil might not reach operating temperature fast enough. 2. As for temperature gauge, since when F30 has coolant temperature gauge? I thought they have oil temperature gauge? When you hit cold like that, turn OFF your heating and ventilation first few minutes, and after few miles just turn heat on to be comfortable. That will limit amount of air that is going through secondary radiator. 3. Transmission fluid? Stick to ZF fluid!
 
Last edited:
Joined
Sep 22, 2016
Messages
157
Location
Minnesota, USA
Problem is with most european cars is the oil runs hot, very HOT. They do this on purpose for better fuel economy and better imissions. I own a 135i myself and track it a few times a year. After a few encounters with 280 degree F oil temps at track (even with 40wt Redline race oil) i knew i needed to do something about this. After some research, the stock oil thermostat on the n54/n55 motors is set at 235 degrees F. So, in the garbage went the stock thermostat and the 10 row oil cooler. Replaced them with a 180 degree F thermostat and a 48 row cooler. Now, during the hottest of summer and sprited driving i see 220 degrees F at the most. On track it stays under 240. Car is ran on a 25psi, 500whp tune on the street and a 20psi, 450whp tune for track. For street i use Redline 5w30 in fall/spring. Car is stored during winter. Summer i use 10w40. On track Redline 40wt. So if you are planning on keeping the car then a bigger oil cooler is a must.
 
Joined
Dec 26, 2005
Messages
23,730
Location
Upper Midwest
They do? Which ones? Just for track or street too? My BMW runs much cooler than my Sienna, it has a huge radiator and (apparently) better cooling capability.
Originally Posted By: Serge
Problem is with most european cars is the oil runs hot, very HOT. They do this on purpose for better fuel economy and better imissions. I own a 135i myself and track it a few times a year. After a few encounters with 280 degree F oil temps at track (even with 40wt Redline race oil) i knew i needed to do something about this. After some research, the stock oil thermostat on the n54/n55 motors is set at 235 degrees F. So, in the garbage went the stock thermostat and the 10 row oil cooler. Replaced them with a 180 degree F thermostat and a 48 row cooler. Now, during the hottest of summer and sprited driving i see 220 degrees F at the most. On track it stays under 240. Car is ran on a 25psi, 500whp tune on the street and a 20psi, 450whp tune for track. For street i use Redline 5w30 in fall/spring. Car is stored during winter. Summer i use 10w40. On track Redline 40wt. So if you are planning on keeping the car then a bigger oil cooler is a must.
 
Status
Not open for further replies.
Top