Mos2http://www1.eere.energy.gov/vehiclesandfuels/p

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So they are seeing a 20-40% reduction in friction and wear with nanoparticles. What are these nanoparticles? Are they any different than the Moly that Shaeffers (med to high dose), Redline (high dose in non-diesel oils), M1 (low dose) are already using?
 
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Bump to see if there is any differences in these Moly nanoparticles vs those used in Shaeffers, Redline, M1 etc.
 

MolaKule

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If you have ever played with mica or held it in your hands, then you know its layers can be split into finer and finer layers. (BTW, mica was and is still used in electronic tubes to separate electrodes and to make capacitors; ask any old Ham Operator ). Anyway, these nanoparticles of Boron, calcium, or moly, or titanium or whatever, form very thin sheets of particles with dimensions in the 1 X 10^-9 meter (nano = 10^-9 of course) ranges. They do a good job of coating and filling in asperities (mechanical hills and valleys) in metal and therefore reduce friction. Improved mechanical and laser milling has reduced the size of these particle from 1 X 10^-6 to 1 X 10^-9 meters. Since many of these particles (in colloidal suspension) are somewhat non-polar, sulfur is usually attached to them to help them bond, so one has to be careful in the formulaton to keep TAN low and TBN high. But base chemistry is usually raised in order to do this, so I don't see a problem with TAN in balanced formulations.
 
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Wow thanks for posting this info. I've been reading up on this for a while now, and have some 1.5um ultra fine moly I'm thinking about testing. Very helpful information! AD
 
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 Originally Posted By: ADFD1
Wow thanks for posting this info. I've been reading up on this for a while now, and have some 1.5um ultra fine moly I'm thinking about testing. Very helpful information! AD
+1, thanks for posting the presentation and a big thanks to Molakule for helping us understand a very-little-understood topic. Does anyone know if the old claims that used to be on BITOG about gears "healing" over time is true (see below)? Has this been debunked? I am wondering because I have seen some engines that run high moly oil that look literally new after 300k miles and I always wondered if the "healing" properties of moly (fill in the asperities I mean) wasn't one of the primary reasons.
 
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