M1 V-Twin 20W50

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9,448
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USA
I noticed it has a flash point of 510F ! This is really high. Is this just a product of the viscosity or are other base stocks at work here. THis is the highest flash point I have seen so far for M1 products or any other oil for that matter. Any idea how this would do in a car?
 
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5,785
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Dixie
JB, How much is it worth it for you to know...? [Wink] Generally a FP of at least 475F means it has a fair amount of ester in the formulation, either diester or polyol-ester ....Way back in the late 1970's the FP of the original Amsoil 20w-50 was up in the 500F range, with their diester formulation. This oil could be 100% diester or perhaps 30% PE like the Redline stuff is. Most likely the latter, I'd suspect .... BTW, there is not an exact correlation between FP and Noack volatility, as the vaporized esters seem to be harder to light than vaporized PAO fluids. Take a look at the FP's and Noacks for the range of Redline fluids and compare them to the latest Amsoil specs. ..................Flash Point .....Noack Volatility Amsoil 5w-30: 442F ...............5.1% (from 3/03) Redline 5w-30: 480F...............6.0% The particular type of additive chemistry also profoundly influences both these properties. Some of the low vis "carrier oils" for the additive package seem to burn pretty easily .... Tooslick Dixie Synthetics (256) 681-3590 [ January 11, 2004, 08:25 AM: Message edited by: TooSlick ]
 
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79
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Texas
Just an observation-conventional petroleum oils, particularly monogrades in the higher viscosities, can have high flash points as well, for example, Delvac 1350 with a flash point of 290C or 554F. Typical Properties Mobil Delvac 1300 Monogrades Mobil Delvac 1330 Mobil Delvac 1340 Mobil Delvac 1350 SAE Grade 30 40 50 Viscosity, ASTM D 445 cSt @ 40ºC 90 132 202 cSt @ 100ºC 11.5 14.7 19.5 Viscosity Index, ASTM D 2270 117 112 110 Sulfated Ash, wt%, ASTM D 874 1.4 1.4 1.4 Total Base #, mg KOH/g, ASTM D 2896 12 12 12 Pour Point, ºC, ASTM D 97 -30 -21 -18 Flash Point, ºC, ASTM D 92 250 256 290 Density @ 15ºC kg/l, ASTM D 4052 0.889 0.892 0.896
 

JohnBrowning

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9,448
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USA
Thanks TooSlick. I tried searching the V-Twin oil but did not find much. I might have to try this oil my Camry this summer and see how she does!! I was guessing that it must have some additional esters in the base stock. Nice to know I am not the only one. AV8R, I know that high vis mongrades have some high flash points but this is not a mono grade. Good point though. AV8R, Like the handle. What type of equipment are you flying?
 
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948
Location
Kyiv, Ukraine
Comparing PDS and MSDS I noticed that high Flash Point does not always mean high Coking Point. Sometimes the oil with a non impressive Flash Point (210-220 C) have 20-30 C higher Coking Point then another oil with Flash Point of 230-250 C. Monograde oils is an example. Anybody knows the reason and would clarify the issue ?
 
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1,653
Location
New England, USA
I've used the M1VTwin 20W-50 as a summer oil in a '74 Triumph TR6 (40K miles, spin-on filter conversion) and haven't had any problems. I also us the M1 MX4T 10W-40 as a Spring-Fall and hibernate for Winter oil. I haven't had any problems, but this car only does 1-2K miles/year. I chose these as I wanted a quality synthetic in the original recommended weights, though I have used M1 15W-50 on occasion. They also advertise as being engineered to protect stored engines...but I am sure all oils do to some extent. The only concern I'd have is catalyst compatibality as these m/c oils are supposed to have higher phosphorus and other additive levels that could affect cat activity. I can't say much more about that, only rumors...but it was on the 'net so it must be true! [I dont know] Anyone have any thoughts on that? Best luck! Regards
 
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43,651
Location
'Stralia
quote:
Originally posted by AV8R: Just an observation-conventional petroleum oils, particularly monogrades in the higher viscosities, can have high flash points as well, for example, Delvac 1350 with a flash point of 290C or 554F. Typical Properties Mobil Delvac 1300 Monogrades Mobil Delvac 1330 Mobil Delvac 1340 Mobil Delvac 1350 SAE Grade 30 40 50 Viscosity, ASTM D 445 cSt @ 40ºC 90 132 202 cSt @ 100ºC 11.5 14.7 19.5 Viscosity Index, ASTM D 2270 117 112 110 Sulfated Ash, wt%, ASTM D 874 1.4 1.4 1.4 Total Base #, mg KOH/g, ASTM D 2896 12 12 12 Pour Point, ºC, ASTM D 97 -30 -21 -18 Flash Point, ºC, ASTM D 92 250 256 290 Density @ 15ºC kg/l, ASTM D 4052 0.889 0.892 0.896
AV8R, I want the U.S. Delvac 1330 down here. we get a V.I. of 95, flash point of 218, pour point of -18, and a TBN of ">10".
 
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450
Location
The Bay Area
quote:
Originally posted by TooSlick: 30% PE like the Redline stuff is. Tooslick Dixie Synthetics (256) 681-3590
TooSlick- How did you find this out? Dave is tight lipped about Red Line's formulation. Oil analysis doesn't show us much either due to calibration issues. Just want to know how you got 30% PE. THX.
 
Messages
79
Location
Texas
JohnBrowning, thanks, PA-32-300T; by the way, I didn't assume this was infomation new to anyone, just thought it interesting, but then I find all this stuff interesting. Also interesting is the fairly high correlation I have observed between flash points and iron (negative, of course) in piston aircraft engines using mineral oils with organic dispersants, no Zn, P, or Ca. Going from SAE 50 to 40 seems to increase Fe about 25%, going to multigrade doubles it. I'm really tempted to try Delvac 1350 for a few hours.
 
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