M1 "extended performance" filters?

Messages
8
Location
las vegas
This is for my wife's 2008 Nissan Versa HB, 24000 miles. Do these filters really clean the oil for 15,000 miles? Is the M1 "extened performance" oil really going to last 15000 miles as they claim? PS: this filter is tiny....darn tiny for $13.
 
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Messages
2,120
Location
Southeast Michigan
As long as you have the room, use an M1-110 instead of the M1-108. The M1-110 is a bit longer but has the same diameter. It's a very common alternative used by Nissan owners.
 
Messages
2,220
Location
Indiana
Read your owners manual, do what it says. What it won't say is, "If you buy Mobil 1 EP and a Mobil 1 filter, you can ignore the advice of the engineers who designed your engine and double the maximum recommended oil change interval". Why risk your $20,000 vehicle over a $30 oil change? That's what my father used to call, 'Penny-wise and Pound-foolish'.
 
Messages
6,495
Location
Connecticut
Originally Posted By: Indydriver
Read your owners manual, do what it says. What it won't say is, "If you buy Mobil 1 EP and a Mobil 1 filter, you can ignore the advice of the engineers who designed your engine and double the maximum recommended oil change interval". Why risk your $20,000 vehicle over a $30 oil change? That's what my father used to call, 'Penny-wise and Pound-foolish'.
You realize they do that for warranty purposes right? They also know most people won't change their oil with Mobil 1. If he does a UOA on the oil that proves it is fine to go 15,000 miles, then yes it is fine to ignore the engineers. The engineers said to use a 5w30 or 10w30 in my jeep, yet it shows the least wear with a 5w40.
 
Messages
357
Location
MN, USA
Originally Posted By: jeepman3071
Originally Posted By: Indydriver
Read your owners manual, do what it says. What it won't say is, "If you buy Mobil 1 EP and a Mobil 1 filter, you can ignore the advice of the engineers who designed your engine and double the maximum recommended oil change interval". Why risk your $20,000 vehicle over a $30 oil change? That's what my father used to call, 'Penny-wise and Pound-foolish'.
You realize they do that for warranty purposes right? They also know most people won't change their oil with Mobil 1. If he does a UOA on the oil that proves it is fine to go 15,000 miles, then yes it is fine to ignore the engineers. The engineers said to use a 5w30 or 10w30 in my jeep, yet it shows the least wear with a 5w40.
that isn't strictly for warranty purposes.
 
Messages
83
Location
Massachusetts
Originally Posted By: Indydriver
Read your owners manual, do what it says. What it won't say is, "If you buy Mobil 1 EP and a Mobil 1 filter, you can ignore the advice of the engineers who designed your engine and double the maximum recommended oil change interval". Why risk your $20,000 vehicle over a $30 oil change? That's what my father used to call, 'Penny-wise and Pound-foolish'.
Federal Law requires manufacturers and dealers to stand by warranties they advertise. If a manufacturer recommends certain lubricants or filters and requires that you follow their program of oil change intervals, then they are required under the law to provide the required warranty materials and service free of charge. If they do not provide the service for free, then the burden of proof is on them to prove negligence in order to void the warranty. By the time they collect scientific information (from independent professionals) and have lawyers bring the evidence before a clerk magistrate or a judge, it would have been cheaper to just repair the car under warranty. Knowledge is power. Many dealers like to play a "tough guy" game with customers and because customers don't know the law, the dealers often get away with it. I can name several dealerships in my area that are no longer in business because they displayed "surliness" to the general public. Keep in mind that when Ford Explorers were rolling over, the courts did not hold driver error responsible for the rollovers or driver negligence responsible for under-inflated tires. It was Ford and Firestone that were held responsible. Ford was expected to build an SUV that is stable in spite of a tire blowout and Firestone was expected to make tires that don't suffer catastrophic failure. Other manufacturers didn't have the problems they had, so it was product liability, not owner negligence or incompetence that caused the rollovers. Most dealers use pretty cheap oil for oil changes. Most modern cars run too hot internally for "Dino" products...the oil cannot survive the heat without breakdown. That is not the case with the synthetics, however, and a big argument for insisting on better quality oil and filters that you can provide, if they won't, and you can use whatever OCI you want whether they like it grin or not.
 
Messages
28,123
Location
Regina, Saskatchewan, Canada
Originally Posted By: OilGuy2
If a manufacturer recommends certain lubricants or filters and requires that you follow their program of oil change intervals, then they are required under the law to provide the required warranty materials and service free of charge.
That really depends upon whether it's a recommendation or a requirement. If my G's manual stated that it must use Genuine Nissan Ester oil and OEM oil filters, yes, American law would likely put them on the hook for providing those parts for free. However, vehicles' manuals don't say that. They may recommend such things, but the say genuine whatever filter or equivalent, and when it comes to oils, they state the viscosity and any API/ILSAC/ACEA or manufacturer's specifications it must meet. They also specify OCIs through mileage, time, or an OLM. In these cases, the manufacturer is decidedly not on the hook for paying for any maintenance items. They are fully entitled to specify standards for maintenance while under warranty. If someone doubles their OCI under warranty using M1 EP and an M1 filter, they undertake certain risks. There is a reason that most oil companies' recommendations involve a disclaimer to follow the car manufacturers' recommendations under warranty. If I doubled my OCI as indicated above, and there was a problem related to the oil (let's say something unlikely like sludging it up to heck), and I took it to the dealer, they'd ask me where in the manual am I entitled to go to a 15,000 mile OCI. They'll say take it up with Exxon-Mobil, who'll ask me where they say that it's okay to ignore the manufacturer's OCI. Of course, such a scenario relies on it being a lubrication related failure. If my fuel pump fails, and I never changed my oil for 30,000 miles and was running 20w-50 SE oil, the car manufacturer would have difficulty denying warranty - it has nothing to do with the OCI or oil choice. Aside from that, manufacturers have every right to ensure that minimum maintenance standards are met. No one, be it car manufacturers, oil blenders, or electronic manufacturers, is required to warranty products that are not used as directed.
 
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