M1 5w30 -> GC 0w30 -> what next for G35 drinker?

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OVERKILL

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Given the consumption, I'd be tempted to try a less expensive 0w-40 like Petro-Canada's Duron-E which I ran in my Expedition for a stint.
 
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compression test for sure. simple enough to do and the tool is cheap enough. vq's seem to eat valve cover gaskets as well, so a visual look would confirm that. for my g37 it was when i had the spark plugs out that i could see the oil in one of the banks.
 
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Originally Posted By: OVERKILL
Given the consumption, I'd be tempted to try a less expensive 0w-40 like Petro-Canada's Duron-E which I ran in my Expedition for a stint.
Bingo, or a pail of Delvac Elite 222 0w-30. The price should be fairly hard to beat on that product.
 
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Synthetic oil does not shear down like conventional oil. It will thicken to the higher side with age as it's base viscosity is the 40 and conventional oil's base is the lower number (5W or 10W) with additives to increase viscosity.
 
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ATP AT-205 for 3000 miles followed up by Valvoline 10w30 Synthetic Maxlife. Bet you $10 it lowers consumption.
 
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Originally Posted By: Rygrego
Synthetic oil does not shear down like conventional oil. It will thicken to the higher side with age as it's base viscosity is the 40 and conventional oil's base is the lower number (5W or 10W) with additives to increase viscosity.
No, that is not correct on any of your points.
 
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Originally Posted By: Shannow
Originally Posted By: OCDriver
Also came across this interesting / concerning tidbit:
Quote:
The idea behind 0W is that, after any engine sits for awhile, all the oil has drained down to the pan, and there's not much protecting the metal parts of the engine ... I understand about oil draining back to the crankcase over time and that the '0W' would pump up quicker on startup, but I'm not surprised to here that bearings can be damaged thru it's use cuz b4 startup it's ALL drained back and there's nothing left 'sticking' to the bearings. Whereas there would be with a '5W' or '10W'. You gotta have something left 'sticking' or it's metal on metal on startup.
Don't read that, you'll lose IQ points trying to follow the falsities in it.
+1. I use 0-20 and after several days of setting you can still feel an oil film on the cam lobe that can be seen through the oil fill hole.
 
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I should have taken a little more time to think how to word my previous post. A 10W-40 multi-grade mineral based oil is made from a 10 grade oil and has viscosity index improvers added to thicken the product. It acts as a 40 grade oil when hot. It acts more as a 10 grade oil at startup. in comparison a 10W-40 synthetic oil is based on a 40 grade oil. This is unlike its counterpart mineral oil based on a 10 grade oil. There are no viscosity index improvers needed. It will never thin but will have the same long term problem as the mineral based oil. But they both thicken with extended age.
 

OVERKILL

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Originally Posted By: Rygrego
I should have taken a little more time to think how to word my previous post. A 10W-40 multi-grade mineral based oil is made from a 10 grade oil and has viscosity index improvers added to thicken the product. It acts as a 40 grade oil when hot. It acts more as a 10 grade oil at startup. in comparison a 10W-40 synthetic oil is based on a 40 grade oil. This is unlike its counterpart mineral oil based on a 10 grade oil. There are no viscosity index improvers needed. It will never thin but will have the same long term problem as the mineral based oil. But they both thicken with extended age.
The number in front of the W is not a viscosity rating, it is simply representative of the oil's cold performance. An oil sporting the 10W-xx designation needs to meet the CCS and MRV requirements set out in J300 at -25C and -30C respectively. Oils are blended using a variety of base stocks and leveraging VII's and PPD's to meet both the cold performance targets as well as the hot (100C) viscosity grade as also spelled out in J300. While it is possible to blend a synthetic oil using no VII's, that is generally not the case. They may require a lower treat rate than a comparable conventional-based blend, and if PAO-based, may not require PPD's to meet their cold temperature target either. AMSOIL's 10w-30 is one example of a synthetic oil without VII's, Redline's 5w-30 is another, however these are exceptions. Most synthetic oils are blended in the same manner as conventional ones.
 
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