Lunch

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47,786
Location
Everson WA - Pacific NW USA
What - are you rich? I ride a car pool. No car. Nowhere to walk for lunch here. Forgot to bring something to eat. Cafeteria has beef dip sandwich special or order some other sandwich. Pass the habanero sauce.
 
Messages
1,357
Location
California, USA
Company cafeteria or "roach coach" here. Chile relleno and bean burrito yesteday. The pastrami sandwich is good, too. Good tasting, not healthy.
 
Messages
47,786
Location
Everson WA - Pacific NW USA
The beef dip was amazingly good. I had vege beef soup on the side. Mazzetta habanero sauce on the guts, dip in jus. mmmmmm(ps au jus does not equal Australian juice [Smile] Comes with tater salad and pickle. I'm all set up. Big belch in the cubicle should get a chuckle...lemme see......brrrraaaaaaaaaaapppppppppp.... Here's the score good one - 3 gross - 1 dude hear this one (all were lame, though) - 4 Maybe I'll do better next time. [Smile]
 
Messages
1,979
Location
Houston
today was last night's leftover jambalaya with diced Chappel Hill (TX) jalapeno sausage, spicy beans, nuked for 3 min at 50%. Them’s eats boys… Dr Pepper from home is 20 cents, in the vending machine they’re 50 cents. 30 cents is 30 cents. Normal is nuke-able frozen dinner, <$2, current favorite is NightHawk. Other times it’s deli meats on lettuce/celery with pepperjack cheese for taste. With a treat packed by My Lovely Wife. Today was rice krispie treat and a few junior mints. She loves me…. Once a week I treat myself to a bought lunch: Whataburger, Subway or if I’m feeling frivolous, Chinese Buffet. Used to watch yuppie-wannabes buy a $10 lunch everyday, impressing each other with their particular plastic du-jour. They all got fat and then had to “work-out” every night to counteract it. Most failed. Then they complained that they weren’t paid enough.
 
Messages
47,786
Location
Everson WA - Pacific NW USA
[LOL!] On Monday we made a yuppie lunch run to a Vietnam pho noodle place. One that I've never been too, 3 of us, one guy, Vietnamese, one mixed Pablo dude, and one Pole with a German name. Mr. Cao got the shlitz [poof] [Duh!] [Embarrassed] - us two white boys thought it was good eats and no belly ache.
 
Messages
47,786
Location
Everson WA - Pacific NW USA
I brought from home today and just ate: Egg sandwich (not egg salad - yuck) 3 eggs slow fried in butter/EVOO mix (this am). Sprinkled with Crystal (brand) Hot Sauce (from the cafet). Bread = organic sprouted flax bread Raw baby carrots Orange slices Hot water
 

sprintman

Thread starter
Messages
11,006
Location
Canberra ACT Australia
Noodles flat type with all sorts of stuff. I'll see if I can find a description somewhere. Have it least once a week for longer than I can remember well at least twenty years. Sometimes Hokkien Mee or Mee Goreng for a change but CKT is my favourite. Mmmm nearly lunchtime.
 

sprintman

Thread starter
Messages
11,006
Location
Canberra ACT Australia
Char Kway Teow (Stir-Fried Rice Noodles) Ingredients : 2 x Chinese sausages (lop cheong) 1/4 lb Medium shrimp (36 to 40 per pound), shelled and deveined 1 tsp Salt 1/4 lb Cleaned squid, with tentacles (See Technique Note) 1/4 lb Chinese barbecued pork 1/4 tsp White pepper 1 1/2 tbl Dark soy sauce 1 1/2 tbl Light soy sauce 1 tbl Oyster sauce 2 lb Fresh rice noodles, in 5/8-inch-wide strips 4 tbl Peanut oil 4 x Cloves garlic, chopped 4 x Shallots, sliced (1/2 cup sliced) 6 x Fresh red chiles, seeded and chopped 1 cup Bean sprouts, tails removed 1 cup Shredded Chinese cabbage 2 lrg Eggs 4 x Green onions, chopped Fresh coriander sprigs, for garnish Method : Nothing is more fascinating and delicious than eating at the open- air street hawker centers in Asia, particularly in Singapore. Each stall serves a specialty, typically an honest, unpretentious, home-style dish for $1 to $3 a plate. This rice noodle dish is hawker food at its best. If done right, its fragrance will tell you how good it's going to be as soon as it arrives at your table. Singapore hawkers will use whatever seafoods are available, including cockles and sliced fish cakes in addition to those suggested in this recipe. Feel free to experiment. 1. Steam the sausages for 10 minutes. Cut them in thin diagonal slices. Toss the shrimp with 1/2 teaspoon of the salt. Let them stand for 10 minutes, rinse well with cold water, drain, and pat dry. Cut the squid into 1/4 inch rings and tentacles. Cut the barbecued pork into 1/4-inch-thick slices. Combine the white pepper, soy sauces, and oyster sauce in a bowl; set aside. 2. Just before cooking, put the noodles in a large bowl and pour boiling water over them. Stir gently with chopsticks to separate the strands, drain, and shake off the excess water. 3. Preheat a wok; when hot, add 2 tablespoons of the oil. Add the remaining 1/2 teaspoon salt and the garlic, shallots, and chiles and cook over medium-high heat until the garlic is golden brown. Increase the heat to high and toss in the shrimp and squid; stirfry until the shrimp turn bright orange and the squid looks opaque white, about 2 minutes. Add the sausage slices, barbecued pork, bean sprouts, and cabbage; toss and stir until the vegetables begin to wilt. Remove everything in the wok to a platter and set aside. 4. Add the remaining 2 tablespoons of oil to the wok; when hot, toss in the well-drained noodles. Gently toss and flip the noodles to heat them through. Be careful not to break them; it is okay if they brown slightly. Push the noodles up the sides of the wok to make a well in the middle; pour in the soy sauce mixture, then toss the noodles gently to sauce them evenly. Make a well again and break the eggs into the middle. Without mixing them with the noodles, scramble the eggs lightly. When the eggs begin to set, add the green onions and return the seafood mixture. Gently toss together to reheat and mix. Serve hot, with a hot chill sauce for seasoning to taste. Garnish with coriander sprigs. NOTE: Both here and in Asia, fresh rice noodles are usually purchased rather than made at home. Look for them in Asian markets or Chinese take-out dim sum shops. This dish can be prepared with dried rice noodles; however, it is worth taking the time to seek out the fresh variety. Make certain that your wok is well seasoned or the fragile rice noodles will break apart and stick to the pan. Although I hesitate recommending that you cook with a non stick wok or skillet, they will work fine if you are more comfortable with them.
 
Messages
47,786
Location
Everson WA - Pacific NW USA
I know the dish!! Yes very delicious. What are you calling it?? I had this in Hong Kong and China as well as Seattle, SF and LA. I just don't what the name you are attaching - can you spell it in pinyin mandarin? My wife (Japanese ancestry) does her version as yaki soba. Also she makes another noodle dish translated as "ants on a branch". The Thai noodle dish, pad thai, of course is world famous, with shrimp, squid, etc., but it's not my favorite.
 

sprintman

Thread starter
Messages
11,006
Location
Canberra ACT Australia
Or Char Kway Teow is another spelling. **** it's good if done well. Somtimes a poor version is to oily or worse burnt. Don't know any pinyin Mandarin and a co-worker who would is in HK for a week (was summoned by the parents).
 
Messages
1,979
Location
Houston
quote:
Originally posted by Pablo: I have no idea what you just ate.
and I have no desire to KNOW what it was.....
 
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