Lubegard Power Steering Flush

Messages
1,724
Location
Cocoa, FL
I have not, but the site seems to say you do not need to use a "flush machine":
Quote:
Without Flush Machine STEP 1. Open the reservoir & add one bottle of LUBEGARD® Power Steering Flush, do not overfill. With car in park and brake on, start engine. Turn steering wheel at least 4 times all the way left and right. Shut off engine and remove old fluid. STEP 2. To refill; Open the power steering reservoir. Add 4 fl oz (118 mL) LUBEGARD Power Steering Fluid Protectant and top off with appropriate power steering fluid to proper level. (*refer to vehicle manual for proper fluid type)
siphon method may be OK (with a long hose....) - definitely better than the messy turkey baster method I saw done in a Walmart parking lot today - and no it was NOT being performed by the Walmart TLE!
 
Messages
1,645
Location
SF Bay Area
in friday's Auto section in the paper, someone wrote in about flushing their p/s fluid. the answer was to goto a shop and have it flushed, OR on the cheap turkey baster method, but instead of waiting for an OCI, drive the car around the block or turn the wheel several times back & forth and suck more fluid out, and do it like 5 times. It said probably 75% of the fluid would be "exchanged", but it would be better than having nothing done.
 
Messages
25,982
Location
Upstate NY
In my Camry with a separate unattached reservoir it was simplier to just remove the reservoir and dump it out. The way the reservoir was made you could not get a turkey baster in. I did it twice a week apart. I am not sure how long one actually needs to wait. I might do a little more than just a drive around the block.
 
Messages
8,598
Location
Florida
Originally Posted By: Donald
In my Camry with a separate unattached reservoir it was simplier to just remove the reservoir and dump it out. The way the reservoir was made you could not get a turkey baster in. I did it twice a week apart. I am not sure how long one actually needs to wait. I might do a little more than just a drive around the block.
My dad's Lexus ES300 had the same type of reservoir. I bought a small syringe that draws out and precisely measures 2 cycle oil. It worked well.
 
Messages
4,564
Location
NW Ohio
The thing I don't like about the turkey baster method is that you aren't removing many of the contaminants vs a full oil change/flush. The metallic stuff is what cases the wear and is the stuff I want to be rid of. IMO, the turkey baster method is valid only after the oil has been full changed first (to get rig of all the manufacturing and break in gunk but note the tests below. On the older Ford, which had been changed two or three times previously in its life (I am the original owner) it was still very nasty. I had the PS oil of my two trucks tested for contaminants: '05 Ford F150: ISO code 20/17/12 for oil with about 15K miles on it. Pretty nasty and most generic sources list 16/13 or so as an idea ISO code for PS systems. BTW, I installed a Magnefine filter on it and got it down to 17/15/12 in about 550 miles. I subsequently changed it the oil. '86 F250 had about 6-10 years and over 30-40,000 miles on the oil and it started at an ISO code of a filthy 21/18/14. With the Magnefine, it went down to 18/16/13 in just 289 miles. Bear in mind that you can remove the return line from the reservoir (plugging its port on the reservoir), extend the hose it into a container by any practical means, and run as much oil thru to flush as is necessary. I found a manual diversion valve online that could be permanently installed (on my Ford at least) to make that job even simpler (I have since lost the link but will find it again by the next time a change is due). All you do then is set the valve to divert to the "oil change nipple", run the engine and add fluid until the discharge is all clean oil.
 
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Messages
6,388
Location
Washington St.
As jim says, the fluid in many systems can be re-routed to a waste container. Try the job with the front wheels jacked up and turn the steering with the engine off. The action should pump the fluid. A full flush isn't usually needed unless someone poured a contaminating fluid (antifreeze, brake fluid, etc.) into the system, or if a part failed and put particles into the system. In the latter case, a Magnefine in line filter on the return works great.
 
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