Lossless audio music

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Originally Posted by alarmguy
Here is why you are wrong, with due respect. You don't buy faulty cheap equipment, unable to properly reproduce a consistent level output across the sound spectrum when the source recording calls for it because your room will be different. Every room is different in every home or arena, you then adjust to your liking and acoustics, even though most screw that up..the key is that the equipment is capable.
Dude, relax. Where did I state that one should buy "faulty cheap equipment."? But when you say that you "adjust to your liking" you are basically saying the same thing I stated earlier: "to obtain the sound I personally enjoy, and that will be different for each of us." But you still have no idea if after "adjusting to your liking" you are hearing exactly what the artist intended or not. That was my only point.
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Yes I was talking headphones in all my threads but to the contrary it's harder or just as hard to get the headphones or plugs into a flat response vs a speaker.
The headphones or IEMs are a closed system (assuming you get a proper seal against your ear canal which is not always easy), unaffected by the room, its layout, sound reflections, etc., and therefore such environment is easier to control and design for, IMO.
 
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Originally Posted by Quattro Pete
I restate my question which you are yet to answer:. How can you know that what you are hearing at home is or is not what the artist intended?
I don't think you can know. How would you? I think it is impossible to reproduce a 100% accurate sound. Close, yes. But is is a copy. There are just too many variables. I say enjoy your sound system and music.
 

Cujet

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Originally Posted by ARCOgraphite
Anyone listen to the Bob Wood links I posted above?
Yes. Sounds good, not my style of music. Right click on the video for "Nerd" information. Seems the codec is MP4a 40.2 (140) The other is OPUS 251 and seems to sound better.
 
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Originally Posted by JeffKeryk
Originally Posted by Quattro Pete
I restate my question which you are yet to answer:. How can you know that what you are hearing at home is or is not what the artist intended?
I don't think you can know. How would you? I think it is impossible to reproduce a 100% accurate sound. Close, yes. But is is a copy. There are just too many variables. I say enjoy your sound system and music.
Exactly.
 
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Originally Posted by Quattro Pete
Originally Posted by alarmguy
Here is why you are wrong, with due respect. You don't buy faulty cheap equipment, unable to properly reproduce a consistent level output across the sound spectrum when the source recording calls for it because your room will be different. Every room is different in every home or arena, you then adjust to your liking and acoustics, even though most screw that up..the key is that the equipment is capable.
Dude, relax. Where did I state that one should buy "faulty cheap equipment."? But when you say that you "adjust to your liking" you are basically saying the same thing I stated earlier: "to obtain the sound I personally enjoy, and that will be different for each of us." But you still have no idea if after "adjusting to your liking" you are hearing exactly what the artist intended or not. That was my only point.
Quote
Yes I was talking headphones in all my threads but to the contrary it's harder or just as hard to get the headphones or plugs into a flat response vs a speaker.
The headphones or IEMs are a closed system (assuming you get a proper seal against your ear canal which is not always easy), unaffected by the room, its layout, sound reflections, etc., and therefore such environment is easier to control and design for, IMO.
Relax? Hey, dude, I am perfectly relaxed. I made some posts in here and you asked me pointed questions, I answered them, your debating me. If you dont think I am relaxed, I can only assume you do not like my answers, so chill. Its all, good, whatever works for the person who is listening to their music, as long as it brings them enjoyment. We are going in circles with this discussion, some will agree and some wont, except to say I am right. :o) Ill try one last time, if I cant explain it to you right, nothing more that I can say, I spent enough time on it. A good system will output the music (signals) that was recorded by the artist and the studio, completely unmanipulated/unaltered. Its is simple as that. How can that be hard to understand? If a manufacturer of headphones is advertising things like "Extra Bass" then it is selling a product that alters the sound to what the manufacturer thinks should be reproduced, its then, people listen to that music, not ever knowing, what it really sounds like, heck, even the instruments sound is altered but most of all the vocals in the vast majority of these devices alter the singers tone of voice. Now if that's someones thing, its fine but its not the artists voice. If you purchase equipment with words like "extra bass" or select equipment that has been doctored by the equipment maker then you can never know the "sound" including even the vocals the artist intended. Almost all lower end consumer equipment now, in the headphone/earphone market manipulates the sound to what the public perceives as "nice". Almost all high end equipment stays true to the signal and by that, one means the sound exiting the transducer when fed a broad signal across the entire audio spectrum will output that signal evenly as close to unaltered as possible across the entire audio spectrum. This ensures it is not exaggerating one part of the spectrum over the other skewing the music to something it is not. Why does this matter? Simple, you are hearing the sounds and vocals of the artist in a more accurate form, the way it was intended. So how do you know what you personally enjoy if the sound you hearing is not the sound that was recorded but is a sound, manipulated by the equipment manufacturer? You have no idea what you are missing if that is the case. So much low end consumer stuff skews the artists voice to the point, people have no idea how they really sound, some people may not like the sound based on this but if they heard the true sound, unadulterated they may not feel that way. If you alter the sound yourself, at least you had a reference point of the actual sound and vocals before you start to change the actual real life tone of someones voice! When you allow equipment makers to deliver products like Extra Bass, you have no idea what you are supposed to be hearing, its all marketing for profits own cheap stuff as it is a lot harder to make accurate equipment and therefor slightly more money but not all that much.
 
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Originally Posted by JeffKeryk
Originally Posted by Quattro Pete
I restate my question which you are yet to answer:. How can you know that what you are hearing at home is or is not what the artist intended?
I don't think you can know. How would you? uote]
Originally Posted by JeffKeryk
[quote=Quattro Pete]I restate my question which you are yet to answer:. How can you know that what you are hearing at home is or is not what the artist intended?
I don't think you can know. How would you? I think it is impossible to reproduce a 100% accurate sound. Close, yes. But is is a copy. There are just too many variables. I say enjoy your sound system and music.
Impossible for 100%, Close yes. Anyone who understands sound and how its reproduced will understand the effects vocals and instruments of equipment that inaccurately reproduces it, this is rampant in the low end consumer market and my posts in this thread in relation to headphones. But the bottom line is on a accurate system, deep vocals will sound deep, mid vocals with sound mid with no coloration from the low end and higher vocals will sound as well. A piano will sound like a piano and sax will sound like a sax, with as little coloration as possible. To obtain these results on low end headphones is extremely hard because they are marketed and skewed towards bass which much of the public thinks is high end, that is completely false. If one does not have a system, one just needs to find a high end store and listen. Many people do not know or understand about inaccurate vocals and instruments and some dont care, its all good, Ill agree with that, but there is no denying it. Feel bad, unintended hi-jack of this thread. I can tell you one thing!!!! THE OP KNOWS EXACTLY WHAT I AM TALKING ABOUT! Just read the post!
 
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Originally Posted by alarmguy
I made some posts in here and you asked me pointed questions, I answered them, your debating me. If you dont think I am relaxed, I can only assume you do not like my answers, so chill.
You never answered my original question: "How can you know that what you are hearing at home is or is not what the artist intended?" The answer is, you can't, unless maybe if you're a good friend of said artist.
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Its all, good, whatever works for the person who is listening to their music, as long as it brings them enjoyment.
I am glad we finally came to an agreement on this. smile
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A good system will output the music (signals) that was recorded by the artist and the studio, completely unmanipulated/unaltered. Its is simple as that. How can that be hard to understand?
I am not arguing that point at all. All I was trying to say is that those perfect/unmanipulated signals are then subject to so many external factors when it comes to home audio systems (not headphones), that by the time that sound reaches your ears it may not be anywhere close to "flat" and not anywhere close to "what the artist intended." You would have to personally speak with the artist and let them play it for you in their studio to have an idea of what he/she intended. They may also intended for you to play it at certain volume. If you play it at lower volume, certain frequencies will be under-represented, given how human ears work.
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If a manufacturer of headphones is advertising things like "Extra Bass" then it is selling a product that alters the sound to what the manufacturer thinks should be reproduced, its then, people listen to that music, not ever knowing, what it really sounds like, heck, even the instruments sound is altered but most of all the vocals in the vast majority of these devices alter the singers tone of voice. Now if that's someones thing, its fine but its not the artists voice.
I never stated anything to the contrary. All I stated was that it is easier for headphone manufacturer to design a product with flat frequency response because they get to control the entire listening environment and don't have to deal with in-room response issues. Naturally, many manufacturers deliberately design V-shaped response curves because they believe this will result in increased sales.
 
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To me, majority of time I listen to music is while I drive and since I don't use headphones then music quality doesn't have to be perfect due to road and other noise and inability to 'submerge' into it. When I do it at home I use headphones most of the time due to sound level I like (to catch smaller details) and not to disturb wife or others, so I can listen to the LPs, CDs and tapes and skip FLAC. FLAC is great for archival purposes only the way I personally see it. Looking at album cover and holding it does add to the experience for me.
 
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