Lincoln TC - Adding Remote Filter not DIY

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I have a '96 Lincoln Town Car with 65,000 miles. The fluid may or may not be original. I want to add a Remote filter to it. I will not be doing this myself. I'm going to find a good trans shop to do it for me. I would love to hear opinions from you folks. Is inline or the oil filter type superior for my car? Any particular brand that is know to be best? Is there a best place to mount it? Does the line to the filter have to be level or can it be raised up, should the filter need to be mounted high? I wanted to run it through the secondary filter for a couple of weeks before changing out all the fluid to new. This way I don't wind up with any metal shavings getting caught where they don't belong. Hopefully! Are there any negatives to a secondary filter system as far as flow rate and shifting efficiency? My car holds 13.9 quarts of fluid if that makes a difference.
 
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The easiest would probably be an inline like a Magnefine. They dont do much in the way of restriction, are inexpensive and feature a traditional element and a magnet w/ a bypass if it were to ever clog(not likely). The magnefine filters to about 35 microns. You could get a perma-cool type mount or hydraulic one from notherntool.You have to mount it, and the elements are usually more expensive, but filtration will be better than the magnefine if you go the hydraulic route and get a 10um rated filter. Most claim this setup reduces flow some, but not enough to affect the behavior or longevity of the transmission. I have never had any issues. Lastly, you could go with a by-pass setup. This is what I am running. Element EaBP-90 rated at 2um absolute. The whole thing will run about fifty bucks. It does little to nothing with flow since it is plumbed across the cooler circuit, so only a small percentage is being filtered at any given time. This in my opinion is the best way to filter transmission fluid and extend drain intervals. Gary allen helped me with mine. He is the guy to talk to. One other thing, if you want to mount the filter high or low it won't make a difference. If you had to you could mount it upside down. Instead of running dirty fluid through your auxillary filter, why not just have them flush it and after they are done have the filter installed. That way you only have to buy one filter element and if anything is suspended during the flush (debris of metal or clutch material) it will be caught by your new filter.
 
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you can get one from the ford dealer. ford requires one to be installed when a trans is repaired and the dealer does not have the proper flush machine to clean out the cooler lines.
 

Art_Vandelay

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 Originally Posted By: AzFireGuy79
The easiest would probably be an inline like a Magnefine. They dont do much in the way of restriction, are inexpensive and feature a traditional element and a magnet w/ a bypass if it were to ever clog(not likely). The magnefine filters to about 35 microns. You could get a perma-cool type mount or hydraulic one from notherntool.You have to mount it, and the elements are usually more expensive, but filtration will be better than the magnefine if you go the hydraulic route and get a 10um rated filter. Most claim this setup reduces flow some, but not enough to affect the behavior or longevity of the transmission. I have never had any issues. Lastly, you could go with a by-pass setup. This is what I am running. Element EaBP-90 rated at 2um absolute. The whole thing will run about fifty bucks. It does little to nothing with flow since it is plumbed across the cooler circuit, so only a small percentage is being filtered at any given time. This in my opinion is the best way to filter transmission fluid and extend drain intervals. Gary allen helped me with mine. He is the guy to talk to. One other thing, if you want to mount the filter high or low it won't make a difference. If you had to you could mount it upside down. Instead of running dirty fluid through your auxillary filter, why not just have them flush it and after they are done have the filter installed. That way you only have to buy one filter element and if anything is suspended during the flush (debris of metal or clutch material) it will be caught by your new filter.
Thanks for all that information. The reason I wanted to run the dirty fluid through the new filter is that I'd like to remove any suspended particles that are in the fluid. This way when I do the drain, there is less debris flowing out at the end. Like when coffee grinds come out only at the bottom of the cup. It's worth the cost of another filter for this piece of mind to me.
 

Art_Vandelay

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 Originally Posted By: bdcardinal
you can get one from the ford dealer. ford requires one to be installed when a trans is repaired and the dealer does not have the proper flush machine to clean out the cooler lines.
Thanks. This is the inline type I take it? How effective is something like this in removing the metal shavings from the fluid? I can see some gray matter in the fluid on my dipstick. Any idea what Ford charges for the part with installation? This doesn't sound like a bad idea at all to me.
 
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An inline will take care of a good majority of the metal shavings. As far as the gray matter ( most likely clutch material) it will have some impact on that but not much. The fluid change should purge most of that, but eventually it will build up again. Bypass filtration keeps the fluid very clean. Both of mine have zero build up of the gray/black clutch material in the fluid!
 

Art_Vandelay

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 Originally Posted By: bdcardinal
the install kit lists for ~$82, the install charge is going to be different for each dealer.
Thank you! Now this is what is considered an inline filter? Hooked right into one of the fluid lines and I guess bolted to the frame/body somewhere? Is this type similar in size to say a fuel filter, as opposed to the oil filter sized ones?
 
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An inline filter is easiest, less problematic, nd way cheaper. And it will help a lot. Our rebuilder won't warranty a tranny unless the inline filter is installed. So get one of those, and a trans cooler. Actually, the tranny cooler is the first thing I'd attend to.
 
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The inline filter is very easy to install and a great spot to use to install a clear tube for the cooler line flush. The filter is good for say 30K miles.
 
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