Latest Production Engine Technologies

Messages
9,448
Location
USA
Thanks! One thing they neglected about the LS7 is that the piston comes out of the bore partialy. They had to add a skirt to the liner to make sure the piston makes it back into the bore with out any hang ups. While I am sure I would love to drive BMW's new I6 I would not want to wear one out!!! It sounds like it might not be rebuildable? Yamaha is really getting quite good at designing engines for other companys! Toyota owns them now. Toyota had them do the work on their HO 1.8L.
 
Messages
4,872
Location
MN
Cool link. You have three modern engines, each with it's own goal. One looking for ultimate performance without outrageous cost, one aimed at lightweight and technology, and one designed for compactness and power. -T
 

427Z06

Thread starter
Messages
7,409
Location
Austin, TX
OK, let's play Dr. AEHaas for a moment. Which of the three engines featured in the article has an oil-water heat exchanger?
 
Messages
39,805
Location
Pottstown, PA
quote:
OK, let's play Dr. AEHaas for a moment. Which of the three engines featured in the article has an oil-water heat exchanger?
Now just wait a minute 427ZO6 ...  - you've got to make it multiple choice and include all of the above and none of the above!!! The answer: Any that don't have it already and eventually get into GeeAea's hands [Big Grin]
 
Messages
1,357
Location
California, USA
Great article, thanks. I am amazed by how much emissions-legal power on pump gas GM can get from an "old fashioned" layout. I love my BMW and am glad the I-6 is alive and well, but I cannot, by looking at the pictures, understand how the valve train works. They should have gone to solenoids instead of that Rube Goldberg mechanism. The rated power assumes 98 octane and we only have 91.
 
Messages
4,872
Location
MN
BMW has been experimenting with electric valves for a while, but the technology is still a little out of reach. This gets to most of the way there though. By looking at the pic I get this: They vary the ratio of the rocker arm(or whatever terminology is correct) by turning the second cam on the top. This allows you to continuously vary the lift of the cam. Combined with a VVT, which allows changing of advance and overlap, you have a lot of camshaft profiles instead of just a couple like some of the currently available setups. -T
 

DJ

Messages
750
Location
New London WI
A few years ago a read an article about some testing Saab was doing with variable compression ratio. The head actually tilted to vary ratio to suit load and could go as high as 14:1 under light throttle and dropped some under acceleration do it could get by on pump gas. Haven't heard anything on since, obviously because of the intake manifold this design was aimed at inline engines, imagine a V8 that could do that talk about an engineering nightmare.
 
Messages
151
Location
Massachusetts
quote:
A few years ago a read an article about some testing Saab was doing with variable compression ratio. The head actually tilted to vary ratio to suit load and could go as high as 14:1 under light throttle and dropped some under acceleration do it could get by on pump gas. Haven't heard anything on since, obviously because of the intake manifold this design was aimed at inline engines, imagine a V8 that could do that talk about an engineering nightmare.
That Saab engine was a supercharged inline 5 cyl, 1.6L I think. It put out 225 hp and got excellent gas mileage. I suspect (without a shred of proof) it never went into production due to marketing - some reviews of the engine gave it high marks for its performance. It'd be hard to sell a luxury car with a 1.6L engine when competitors have 3L and up V6/V8's etc. Then again, perhaps there were long-term reliability issues. From google: http://64.233.161.104/search?q=cache:Ly_SpyFC0NgJ:www.popularmechanics.com/automotive/auto_technology/1266656.html+saab+variable+compression+engine&hl=en&lr=lang_en
 
Top