Kia Niro engine oil specification confusion

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The oil gets thinner as it warms up
Yes it does.

But "Weight" doesn't mean a specific viscosity at a specific temperature.

Actually, it doesn't meant anything.

The correct term is "Grade"

Guys, you gotta STOP using "Weight" or we will always have the Multigrade "W"inter confusion.

A 5W30 performs like a 5W monograde when Cold**, then like an SAE 30 grade when HOT ( KV100 min/max).

What happens at KV40 is quite variable among brands and that is still "fever temperature"
_______________________________________________

**At least to CCS and or MRV test requirements for oil grade classification.
 
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Yes it does.

But "Weight" doesn't mean a specific viscosity at a specific temperature.

Actually, it doesn't meant anything.

The correct term is "Grade"

Guys, you gotta STOP using "Weight" or we will always have the Multigrade "W"inter confusion.

A 5W30 performs like a 5W monograde when Cold**, then like an SAE 30 grade when HOT ( KV100 min/max).

What happens at KV40 is quite variable among brands and that is still "fever temperature"
_______________________________________________

**At least to CCS and or MRV test requirements for oil grade classification.
What's a "5W monograde" oil? I don't see that designation in SAE J300.

Nothing that's quite so misunderstood as what the winter rating means, and what it does not.
 
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I know what he means...... Hyundai gives you the first six oil changes on the house now. They say "Three years of free maintenance" which translates to six oil changes with that cheap bulk oil and six tire rotations. Of course, that gives them the chance to sell you something extra for six visits too.

But you can always give them a jug of oil to use. Cost you an extra $15 to have them feed your beast whatever flavor you can get at Walmart. I don't see any evidence that their cheap bulk oil doesn't work just the same.
I just cut the interval in half, change via dipstick sucker, refill with Stupertech 5w-30. Then let them service at 7500, where they change the filter and rotate tires. I sleep better ag night now.
 
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What's a "5W monograde" oil? I don't see that designation in SAE J300.

Nothing that's quite so misunderstood as what the winter rating means, and what it does not.
The are NO Engine applications that I am aware of, It was a moot argument for illustrative purposes within this discussion. And sorrowfully likely added to more confusion than less.
5W is more often seen in Motorcycle Fork oil and possibly some Hydraulic oils, though I'm more familiar with SAE 10W Hydraulic oils. The MRV spec is into play when you add the W rating to a 5, 10, 20 or 25 SAE Grade oil providing anti-waxing or gelling in "Winter" environments. Since there is no SAE measurement for viscosity at 32F/0C then it is true that the we cannnot ascertain though specification that a 5W20 would indeed approach an SAE "5W" at the freezing point - or thereabouts; then as a further differentiator, the Multigrade would have the benefit of it's associated higher operating grade HTHS.

I think the old inferred transferrability between Multigrade W designations and their SAE monograde equivalents
Has long been a point of confusion, as is the often discussed inappropriate transposition of terms "winter" and "weight"
 

4WD

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Might be helpful if ?

 
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My daughter owned a 2014 Elantra and now a 2019 Santa Fe and my son owned a 2010 Soul so I can tell you from experience that their oil recommendations in the owners manual are a complete mess. They used to recommend Quaker State, that's still what Hyundai recommends in my daughters Santa Fe, and the owners manual lists 5W-20, 5W-30 and 10W-30 along with the goofy ACEA A5 or higher recommendation.
My 2020 Kia actually specs Total Quartz as the recommended brand -- I tend to agree, Hyun/Kia seem to be all over the road with regards to a preferred brand of oil. Total Quartz is available via Internet sales, but I personally haven't seen much of it on store shelves in my area.

The 2.0L engine in my Kia Soul specs 5w20 (CAFE, of course), with 5w30 and 10w30 allowed -- so I go with Valvoline Advanced Synthetic in 5w30, along with the OEM filter. There's an entirely separate debate around the 35504/05 OEM filter, but I use it with confidence.
 
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If the owners manual gives you choices, then use whatever you want.

Hyundai/kia was already warned concerning OE filters. You don't need to use Hyundai/Kia filters.

My recommendation, because of some garbage engineering and/or supplier issues that Hyundai will never fess up to, is to use the thickest grade in your owners manual, in full synthetic, considered safe for you weather conditions.

Both of my NA theta-ii's recommend conventional 5w20 oil. I use full synthetic 5w30. My theta-ii turbo recommends conventional 5w30 and I used 5w40. And, because I don't want to be one with clattering engine disease, or permanently stalling when needed(aka seizing), I practice the severe service interval and check the oil level weekly keeping them full always.

I've used 15w50 in Northern winters(Me/NH/VT) and never had an issue with my engines many years ago.... always starting every cold day with no problems all winter. So, I don't see ANY problem with using a 5w30, 10w30, or 5w40, year round, unless you plan on trips to the north pole during winter. Moronic tech writers recommend ACEA A5 or above, but don't define 'above'. They recommend API SM or above which is easy to understand since SN, SN+, and now SP are API's newer specs. So, use API SM or 'newer'. And, ILSAC GF4 or above, like GF5 and now GF6. They even allow ACEA A3. And, as long as it meets "1", you're covered. ACEA or API or ILSAC or 0w20 or 5w20 or 5w30 or 10w30 and you're good! If the start/stop is often exercised, might toss in a 0w30 too! See, 0w exceeds the cold weather capability of 5w or 10w and the 30 is equivalent regardless!

Concerning multi grade and single grade...
A prefix with have the "w". A suffix will not. A multi-grade will have one prefix and one suffix.
In the attached picture, the left column is a list of single grades.
Single grade prefixes... 0w, 5w, 10w, 15w, 20w, 25w
Single grade suffices... 8, 12, 16, 20, 30, 40(x2), 50, 60
Combing 1 prefix and 1 suffix is a multi-grade.

To prevent confusion, and because some grades 'overlap', a multigrade can only use 1 suffix and 1 prefix.... In the old days, a 0w30 could be labelled a 0w/5w/10w-30 but not anymore. How about a 0w/5w-40, or a 0w-16/20? No more confusion is allowed for simple consumer minds.
HTHS is another ballgame.

The finance guy at Kia recently told use we must use OE filters. I told him to go pound sand in a very uncensored way. He said that Wix filters will leak. I let him know that Wix and Hyundai filters cruise down the same Korean assembly line and the only difference is the extra baseplate hole needed to meet 'other' automaker requirements. I guess the cost to drill that hole exceeds the Hyundai/Kia budget for bulk filter purchasing.
 

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My 2020 Kia actually specs Total Quartz as the recommended brand -- I tend to agree, Hyun/Kia seem to be all over the road with regards to a preferred brand of oil. Total Quartz is available via Internet sales, but I personally haven't seen much of it on store shelves in my area.

The 2.0L engine in my Kia Soul specs 5w20 (CAFE, of course), with 5w30 and 10w30 allowed -- so I go with Valvoline Advanced Synthetic in 5w30, along with the OEM filter. There's an entirely separate debate around the 35504/05 OEM filter, but I use it with confidence.
Not really,

Hyundai has always been (Well, last 10 years or so) Quaker State/SOPUS and KIA, Total.
 
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Not really,

Hyundai has always been (Well, last 10 years or so) Quaker State/SOPUS and KIA, Total.
Given that's the case, I wonder what the difference is between SOPUS and Total? Are there significant differences between Hyundai and Kia engines to warrant different recommended oils? Or is it all just business/endorsement deals?

(Not trying to be difficult, just trying to learn something!)
 
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Or is it all just business/endorsement deals?
That's exactly what Quaker State has going with Hyundai. It's a comprehensive program that includes special pricing based on volume. It's used as factory fill, and is available to dealers at a really good price. There are also products, packaging, merchandising and programs that are geared towards helping dealers sell lube services.

Edit/disclaimer: This was accurate information as recently as a couple of years ago. But, I've retired, and don't know for certain if the Hyundai/QS business arrangement still exists.
 
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