Keeping an old Tesla alive...

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6,496
Location
Los Gatos, CA
As the early Model S cars age, it will be interesting to see what it takes to keep them alive, or even if it is worth doing at all.
I will be following this series.
2013 Model S

This is a very early car; I have to believe there will be a lotta work (and $$) involved. But compared to a new one...
If someone just needed a commuter and wanted a fun, really fast one, and wanted an EV, an older Model S might be considered.
Is there a used Model S in my future? Just maybe...
 

OVERKILL

$100 Site Donor 2021
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45,790
Location
Ontario, Canada
As the early Model S cars age, it will be interesting to see what it takes to keep them alive, or even if it is worth doing at all.
I will be following this series.
2013 Model S

This is a very early car; I have to believe there will be a lotta work (and $$) involved. But compared to a new one...
If someone just needed a commuter and wanted a fun, really fast one, and wanted an EV, an older Model S might be considered.
Is there a used Model S in my future? Just maybe...

Pretty impressive TBH. The wiper arm wear is interesting, last time I saw something like that was my sister's old 5-series, which had similar mileage on it.
 

OVERKILL

$100 Site Donor 2021
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45,790
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Ontario, Canada
LOL, my newest gasoline burner is 2011. Daughter drives a 2001.
So when I saw "old" and "Tesla" in the title I was kind of... whaaat?

Yup, my parents drive a 2000 Expedition and a 2003 Town Car. The Expedition has similar mileage to the 2013 Tesla here though, it has a lot of miles on it, which I think is a big concern for people, how many miles they'll be able to put on before battery replacement is necessary.
 
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359
Location
VA, US
The first Tesla S cars were build more... had made, than on a true production line. Errors were easier to be made.
 
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6,323
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Suburban Washington DC
This is a very early car; I have to believe there will be a lotta work (and $$) involved.
Why? Electric motors and their transmissions are much simpler than on gas cars. The battery is the bugger. Early Leafs are totaled when they need a new battery, unless you can live with a 30 mile range. And that's with NIMH batteries. The Tesla used LI which lasts much longer but probably costs 3 times as much.
 
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1,519
Location
iowa
A guy I know has a 2013 or something one of 300 Tesla Roadsters, which he doesn't drive much, and the battery went belly up. The car could not be moved, and had to be drug up with the wheels locked onto a flat bed. I got to drive that thing once, and it was amazing.
 
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6,415
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Scruffy City
To be honest it is pretty impressive for 215ish thousand miles... yes it would have been nice if the PO had fixed the wipers before they ate the hood...

I don't see why it should be that expensive to fix, other than the Tesla model of restricting parts and so forth.

If he thinks that car is in bad shape, he would absolutely have a stroke at what 80 % of America drives....
 

JeffKeryk

Thread starter
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6,496
Location
Los Gatos, CA
A guy I know has a 2013 or something one of 300 Tesla Roadsters, which he doesn't drive much, and the battery went belly up. The car could not be moved, and had to be drug up with the wheels locked onto a flat bed. I got to drive that thing once, and it was amazing.
My understanding is, while the range was short, the first Roadster is now a collector's item.
And can be expensive...
 

JeffKeryk

Thread starter
Messages
6,496
Location
Los Gatos, CA
Why? Electric motors and their transmissions are much simpler than on gas cars. The battery is the bugger. Early Leafs are totaled when they need a new battery, unless you can live with a 30 mile range. And that's with NIMH batteries. The Tesla used LI which lasts much longer but probably costs 3 times as much.
I believe the drivetrain is fine. Fixing up any old car is crazy expensive and a labor of love.
Don't ask me how I know...
68 shiny.jpg
 
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10,631
Location
Jupiter, Florida
It's always possible the aftermarket will provide replacement parts. Unfortunately, there are an insufficnet number of these old Tesla's around, there is not much of a market.

I strongly suspect a more modern aftermarket battery could be made in a cost competitive way. Maybe even using larger and more reliable (but less energy dense) LiFePO4 cells.
 

JeffKeryk

Thread starter
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6,496
Location
Los Gatos, CA
Problem with these once they age is getting parts.
Yes, and a really early car like this would not be my choice, because Tesla added a lot of tech in the following years.
Always start with the best car you can. And know what you want to end up with.

When we bought out car in Dec 2018, I considered a used Model S.
But in comparison, the Model 3 was clearly the tech leader; it was an easy choice.
 
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1,455
Location
USA
Keeping a Tesla running will be a huge feat if they can't get their parts supply in place, and covering parts under warranty that should be covered. Tesla was recently forced to recall alot of model S and X as the screens fail prematurely, leading to a safety hazard. They fought the recall. If this is any indication, they will become throw away vehicles. Tesla forced to recall over failed screens.
 
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400
Location
WA
2013 old? getting parts?
I can still get NOS parts recently recycled '80 Bronco.
This is laughable. Is it really that disposable and hassle to own when the warranty expires?

We're so screwed when it fills the landfill and water aquifers.
considering the way ICE cars run to 400k + (miles). Camry & Accord et al beat electrics handily. Resale too. No wonder Tesla wants
the old stuff to vanish from the market instead of doing no-win battery replacement math.
 
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