Just had to replace the sump pump

Messages
11,196
Location
NY Capital District
So I just had to help my grandfather and replace the sump pump. The one that was here was an old Shur-dri, that's been in there for about 17 years. It has been through 3 floats in that time, and the bearings recently have been... Well, less than healthy sounding. It runs about every 10 minutes on a normal day, but when it's raining heavily (like that big storm we had the other day) it will run about 15 seconds after shutting off from the previous one. The old one had started working intermittently since about february, but it had gotten worse in recent weeks. The battery backup needs a new control panel, and because of that, it makes a heck of a racket when it tries to turn on. I was sitting on my computer minding my own business about a week ago, when suddenly I hear said awful racket. It was raining pretty good too. I went over, and it had not turned on, and was all the way to the top of the sump pit. I reached down and shook the float around for a few minutes, and it finally came on- but then wouldn't shut off again. I had to babysit it for the better part of 45 minutes until it seemed to work by itself. I did some research, and ended up going with a Wayne CDU800 subersible pump. It's a 1/2 Horse, and for the 4-5' rise we have, according to Wayne it should be able to pump a good 3900GPH or so. More than enough. I had to go to Lowes and buy new fittings to make the backup fit, and get it from the pump and the check valve, to the hard line. It was a lot of fun, something I haven't had to do before. 2-3 days after I put the new pump in, we had a massive storm, the one mentioned above. This thing worked flawlessly. I'm extremely happy with the decision. And I don't have to go to bed and worry about if my computer will be destroyed by water before the morn'. Here it is, working hard during that storm.
 
Messages
7,246
Location
MIchigan
I've went thru 2 sump pumps in the ten years I've lived in my home. The first was a Rigid that had a pressure switch to turn the pump on/off. The switch went bad from moisture getting on the wiring and corroding. Called Rigid and they sent me a new one. When I got the new switch I took it apart and coated the wires with diaelectric grease and sealed it back up with silicone. About a year and half later the pump failed. A couple of the bolts that hold the thing together rusted away and it wouldn't work right so I had to get a new one. I ended up getting a Wayne this time and before putting it into the sump I coated all the metal parts with grease. Grease is your friend since these things are submerged in water 24/7 so grease it up.
 
Messages
6,367
Location
Midwest
It actually runs every 10 minutes on a normal day? I'm surprised anyone would invest in a home with water issues that severe.
 
Messages
36,537
Location
ME
Originally Posted By: Pop_Rivit
It actually runs every 10 minutes on a normal day? I'm surprised anyone would invest in a home with water issues that severe.
What is this, I don't even... Thanks Nick for looking after your grandpa! A house in Phoenix comes with heat issues that need electrical contraptions to pump the heat back out. One in Buffalo has snow issues that need OPE to blow it all away. Florida needs hurricane ties. This place, water comes in, water goes out, life goes on...
 
Messages
19,686
Location
Sunny Florida
^^^Hahaha, ole Pops is always good for entertainment. We live in Fl and have a rear patio that requires a sump pump to help keep it dry. Actually drains well, but not when we get 2 inches in 20 minutes, which happened a week ago! I use 2 pumps, one is a 110 volt 1/2 hp model that really moves the water, then I have a Basement Watchdog as its backup for some redundancy...
 
Messages
3,622
Location
Ohio
Originally Posted By: Pop_Rivit
I'm surprised anyone would invest in a home with water issues that severe.
Where exactly is this perfect world you live in located?
 
Messages
17,298
Location
OH
I replaced a dying ten year old Wayne pedestal pump with a Flotec submersible about eleven years ago. I have a spare on hand. In heavy rain events, the thing will run almost continuously and it isn't unusual for the pump to run once or twice a day, except when we go through an extended dry spell and there's little water moving through the ground. Good work on your part, since your quick and correct actions saved your grandfather from having a flooded basement.
 
Messages
40,848
Location
Great Lakes
Originally Posted By: SteveSRT8
I use 2 pumps, one is a 110 volt 1/2 hp model that really moves the water, then I have a Basement Watchdog as its backup for some redundancy...
I've got a similar setup at my house. Can't recall what the original primary pump was that the home builder put in, but it failed within 5 years. I had it replaced with a PHCC Pro Series pump that's made by the same company that makes Basement Watchdog (Glentronics). They are actually local to where I live, so that's probably why my plumbing company uses them. Anyway, this new pump is a lot quieter than the old pump and it also seems to pump faster. The downside is that it came with some funky float switch that sits in a plastic cage. Well, I had some debris/styrofoam pieces get into the sump pit, and they got stock in that little cage and prevented the float switch from returning to the off position which in turn prevented the pump from shutting off. I was away from home for 2 weeks, and when I came back, the pump was running with practically no water in the pit. Not sure how long it's been running like that non-stop. Supposedly it has a thermal protection switch that prevents it from overheating, but I'm not looking forward to my electric bill next month. frown I'm also wondering how much this stint shortened the pump's life.
 
Messages
17,298
Location
OH
The pump's life has no doubt been reduced, but a quality pump lasts a long time anyway. I wonder why the maker caged the float, since debris in the sump pit is not uncommon and the outcome that you saw is probably also not uncommon.
 

Nick1994

$50 Site Donor
Messages
13,447
Location
Phoenix, AZ
Originally Posted By: eljefino
Originally Posted By: Pop_Rivit
It actually runs every 10 minutes on a normal day? I'm surprised anyone would invest in a home with water issues that severe.
What is this, I don't even... Thanks Nick for looking after your grandpa! A house in Phoenix comes with heat issues that need electrical contraptions to pump the heat back out. One in Buffalo has snow issues that need OPE to blow it all away. Florida needs hurricane ties. This place, water comes in, water goes out, life goes on...
Actually almost no house in Phoenix has a basement, I even had to use Google to figure out what a sump pump is for, we don't use them. Lol
 
Messages
36,537
Location
ME
Originally Posted By: Nick1994
Originally Posted By: eljefino
Originally Posted By: Pop_Rivit
It actually runs every 10 minutes on a normal day? I'm surprised anyone would invest in a home with water issues that severe.
What is this, I don't even... Thanks Nick for looking after your grandpa! A house in Phoenix comes with heat issues that need electrical contraptions to pump the heat back out. One in Buffalo has snow issues that need OPE to blow it all away. Florida needs hurricane ties. This place, water comes in, water goes out, life goes on...
Actually almost no house in Phoenix has a basement, I even had to use Google to figure out what a sump pump is for, we don't use them. Lol
I was talking about air conditioning in an example where Nature and how your house sits don't always get along but there's a thing for that.
 
Top