is mobil 1 5w30 that bad for lt1/ls1 motors

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Ive read on here that mobil 1 5w30 isnt the best option for lt1/ls1 motors people claim its too thin. Is it the 5w30 weight that is too thin or just mobil 1 5w30. I searched pds and mobil 1 has more viscosity 100c cst and hths then Pennzoil plat, qsud, synpower, and syntec 5w30. I cant find hths for royal purple but cst wise mobil is thicker.
 

irocurpony

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everytime i read about mobil 1 5w30 its people saying its too thin i guess they are talking about the weight. i run mobil 1 10w30 high mileage in my lt1
 

ls1mike

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I have run M1 10W30 in 2 previous LS1s, Current one with a bunch of mods, and my 6.0 2002 Silverado. I have never had a problem. I think 5W30 is what is recommened.
 
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M1 5w30 is fine for LS1 engines. The engine in my Camaro had nothing else for the first 158,000 miles of its life, and the engine still runs strong and does not use oil.
 
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My LS1 got a bit quieter when I switched from M1 10W-30 to German Castrol 0W-30, but I can't say M1 was bad for the engine. With the heat here in Vegas, and the possibility of track days (hey, I can dream, can't I?) I prefer the thicker oil, and am willing to give up a mile or so per gallon of gas. When I replaced LIMs in my '97 Vortec 5.7 that had a steady diet of the same weight M1, the I noticed you could eat off of the oil passages they were so clean.
 
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GC is on my list of oils to try in the Camaro, but I'm still in the process of evaluating Red Line 5w30. I didn't switch from M1 over any dissatisfaction. I just wanted to sample the unequaled high-temperature qualities of Red Line. Since the Camaro gets 8-10 track days a year, I figured the extra protection couldn't hurt.
 
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Originally Posted By: irocurpony
Ive read on here that mobil 1 5w30 isnt the best option for lt1/ls1 motors people claim its too thin. Is it the 5w30 weight that is too thin or just mobil 1 5w30. I searched pds and mobil 1 has more viscosity 100c cst and hths then Pennzoil plat, qsud, synpower, and syntec 5w30. I cant find hths for royal purple but cst wise mobil is thicker.
The KV100 spec' is of no importance in terms of operational viscosity, but the HTHSV 3.1cP that most 5W-30 oils like M1, PP, PU and the rest likely have is more than adequate for a street driven LT1 and LS1. A_Harman has experience running M1 5W-30 on the track with high oil temp's in his Chevy that you will never see on the street, without issue. Bottom line, for the street, running an oil heavier than the 3.1cP spec' is counterproductive.
 
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The answer to the original question is M1 is one of the best oils you can put in your Vette which is why GM chose M1 and never looked back. 20 years of engine testing and racing with M1. It's ability to handle high engine temperatures is superior to most other synthetic oils and the new 5w30 SN formula does exceptionally well in the SEQ IVA and IIIG wear tests.
 
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Originally Posted By: CATERHAM
Originally Posted By: irocurpony
Ive read on here that mobil 1 5w30 isnt the best option for lt1/ls1 motors people claim its too thin. Is it the 5w30 weight that is too thin or just mobil 1 5w30. I searched pds and mobil 1 has more viscosity 100c cst and hths then Pennzoil plat, qsud, synpower, and syntec 5w30. I cant find hths for royal purple but cst wise mobil is thicker.
The KV100 spec' is of no importance in terms of operational viscosity, but the HTHSV 3.1cP that most 5W-30 oils like M1, PP, PU and the rest likely have is more than adequate for a street driven LT1 and LS1. A_Harman has experience running M1 5W-30 on the track with high oil temp's in his Chevy that you will never see on the street, without issue. Bottom line, for the street, running an oil heavier than the 3.1cP spec' is counterproductive.
^^^^Quite true. BUT, if I were going to use M1 for a LOT of combined street/track use, in the heat, I would opt for their exemplary 0W-40, or at the very least, M1 5W-30 HM, despite the great luck/results A_H has had with plain old 5W-30 on lapping days/HPDEs. wink
 
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M1 5W-30 and 10W-30 (from my observation) has the highest wear numbers of any oil in the UOA section. It puzzles me why people use that oil - if you can even call it an oil.
 

OVERKILL

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Originally Posted By: Merkava_4
M1 5W-30 and 10W-30 (from my observation) has the highest wear numbers of any oil in the UOA section. It puzzles me why people use that oil - if you can even call it an oil.
Considering the purpose of UOA's, the fact that you are drawing any sort of "conclusion" from that is alarming. If you can even call it a conclusion....... Nothing is stopping you from trying to learn sharp shooting with a 12-gauge. But that doesn't mean it is the right tool for the job.
 
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Originally Posted By: OVERK1LL
Considering the purpose of UOA's, the fact that you are drawing any sort of "conclusion" from that is alarming. If you can even call it a conclusion.......
We're not supposed to draw conclusions from UOA's ? I'm referring to those two specific viscosities; I'm not referring to their HM oils or their thicker grades. I feel comfortable in my assertion that if you take two identical cars, each driven the same mileage and driven in the same identical conditions; each having identical silicon, potassium, and fuel dilution numbers; one car with M1 5W-30 and the other car with a good quality Dino 5W-30; the Dino will EASILY give you lower wear numbers.
 

OVERKILL

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Originally Posted By: Merkava_4
Originally Posted By: OVERK1LL
Considering the purpose of UOA's, the fact that you are drawing any sort of "conclusion" from that is alarming. If you can even call it a conclusion.......
We're not supposed to draw conclusions from UOA's ? I'm referring to those two specific viscosities; I'm not referring to their HM oils or their thicker grades. I feel comfortable in my assertion that if you take two identical cars, each driven the same mileage and driven in the same identical conditions; each having identical silicon, potassium, and fuel dilution numbers; one car with M1 5W-30 and the other car with a good quality Dino 5W-30; the Dino will EASILY give you lower wear numbers.
And the "wear" numbers mean what exactly? You are using a hammer as a screwdriver here.
 

OVERKILL

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............
Originally Posted By: Doug Hillary
UOAs are a great tool in the Management of any machinery that uses liquid lubricants. Unfortunately, their real value is often misunderstood by those who contribute to BITOG. Firstly, it is important to realize that you get what you pay for. The most common forms of UOA are limited in their scope. It is a case of if you pay more you get more. So my comments here relate primarily to the “simple” UOAs – the cornerstone of those appearing on BITOG Secondly, it is easy to assume that by carrying out a UOA you will be able to determine how quickly the engine is wearing out. As well, if you change lubricant Brands you will be able to compare the wear metal uptake results and then make a balanced best lubricant choice to make your engine last longer. Sadly that logic is seriously flawed. Single pass (random) UOAs will provide some information regarding wear metals but unless you have a history of your engine’s performance up to around 1 million miles the results are simply that – UOA results! As an example a limit of 150ppm of Iron is a reality – after say 100k it means the lubricant should be changed and all is well. But what is the situation if you have 150ppm of Iron at 5k? Where would you look what would or could you do? So UOAs are really a diagnostic tool – one of many! The other parts of the UOA Report will be much more valuable to you – it will tell you about the CONDITION of the lubricant and its suitability for further use. This will enable you to get the maximum safe use from the lubricant saving a valuable resource in the process.
 
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