Is it bad to put tire sealant as a permanent fix to a slow leak?

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Jan 29, 2012
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As per the title. I made the mistake of using a set of allow wheels for my winter tires. Although I personally wire brushed the bead sealing lip perfectly before installing my winter tires, 5 years later the tires have slow leaks in varying rates. I figure I have maybe 2-3 seasons left on these winter tires, and I don't really want to pay a shop to unmount + remount all of them. So I'm thinking to just inject a bunch of Slime/generic tire sealant in there to hold for the time being. Is the next shop that works on these going to hate me for it?

Also, does anyone know if shops usually clean alloy wheels properly before install, or are they just throwing bead sealant on them and calling it a day? Last time I wire brushed them with an air tool, I remember it being super time consuming so I can't imagine most shops to be cleaning these wheels off properly before an install.

Next time I wear out these tires, I'm thinking I should use the alloy rims for the summer and my steelies for the winter.
 
Yes, tire shops will clean, prep the bead area on a wheel / rim and apply a rubber lube prior to installing the tire.

Sealant is not a permanant repair. I won't use it even on a riding mower tire. Slime is corrosive and many tire shops won't touch a tire if they know Slime was used. Anything from a can, shouldn't be in a tire.
 
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My lawnmower tire got an extra 7 yrs out of the leak by using slime. However, it started to leak again & I'm afraid to take it into the tire shop for a tube install. I'll have to ask them over the phone first if they want to mess with something that I had to put like 3 cans of slime into it just to get it to stop leaking. It's a temp. band aid. If you're talking about an actual automobile then there is no doubt in my mind. Pony up the cash now & get new tires. 5 yrs out of a set of tires is about the time I need to replace mine anyways just from weathering cracks alone.
 
Nope! I do it :D

The shop will hate it if you don't tell them. So when you need new tires, just tell them you have slime in it.

The green slime in the clear plastic bottle is the good stuff. Don't use the metal can version, as it's not the same formula :sneaky:
 
I've done it with traditional fix-a-flat, and it works some of the time.

Here's how you do it, though. Many screw this part up.

Let all the air out of your tire. Throw a jack underneath so you aren't pinching the sidewall.

Put your fix-a-flat in. Now the can won't be fighting your residual air pressure, and more will go in.

Add air, to 45-50 PSI.

Drop the car off the jack and quickly go for a drive. Alternate between 25 and 60 mph as much as you can. This flings the sealant into all the corners. The additional air pressure forces it through your leak holes more effectively.

This all said, I think you should get the HF tire machine so you can dismount your tires and clean your wheels up the correct way. Nobody will pay more attention to your needs than you yourself.
 
I grasp the basics of a clean, serviceable wheel as well as what effort is needed to refinish one.

I've never seen people in videos machine buffing/polishing wheel beads to assure a good tire seal.

How do people get steel spring lead weights off aluminum wheels without scratching? Those scratches go near the bead.
 
My lawnmower tire got an extra 7 yrs out of the leak by using slime. However, it started to leak again & I'm afraid to take it into the tire shop for a tube install. I'll have to ask them over the phone first if they want to mess with something that I had to put like 3 cans of slime into it just to get it to stop leaking. It's a temp. band aid. If you're talking about an actual automobile then there is no doubt in my mind. Pony up the cash now & get new tires. 5 yrs out of a set of tires is about the time I need to replace mine anyways just from weathering cracks alone.
You will be surprised how much rust will be present on the inside of the rim. The rim is likely ruined.
 
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