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investopedia.com is a good place to start. I learned it by myself at first then when I did my MBA.
 
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I also learned (perhaps more than I would have liked at the time) while getting my MBA. Really, you can learn a lot from investopedia. You can get a one year subscription to a magazine like Kiplingers personal finance for ten bucks. Spend 30 minutes a month reading at and thinking about how it applies to you and it will pay itself back thousandfolds. Also, some time at yahoo finance playing with calculators will give great insights as to the huge leverage time and interest rates have on what your future will be like.
 
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 Originally Posted By: ravenchris
Learn about saving and compound interest results over 40-50 years.
Staggering results, yet few believe or employ it.
 
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Learn to reduce or eliminate debt, and the risk vs. return on each business before you decide what is right for your comfort level. This is the reason I would never recommend stocks to my parents (too risky for them), or real estate to my in-laws (too lazy to take care of rental properties). Also what you are familiar with is a very important tool that can help you see pass what big corp can't see from a 30,000 feet bird eye view in investment selection and market timing.
 
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Find out about, learn, and start buying 2X and 3X long ETF's. Don't put all your money in them, and don't watch them too closely. Just buy 100 shares here, 100 shares there. Check back in 30 years.
 
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 Originally Posted By: Pablo
Just buy 100 shares here, 100 shares there. Check back in 30 years.
And realize that your return is always behind the market average due to high cost/fee?
 

JHZR2

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+1 to pablo I also like to try various scenarios... wacky ones, ones based upon various research, evaluations, etc. Lots of scholars have done this, but in the path of doing it yourself, you gain benefit from learning from others, getting knowledge, experience and leads, and start to see firsthand some of the basis for why certain claims are made in any media that is offering suggestions.
 
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 Originally Posted By: PandaBear
 Originally Posted By: Pablo
Just buy 100 shares here, 100 shares there. Check back in 30 years.
And realize that your return is always behind the market average due to high cost/fee?
Yes and no. Even at $8 trade it's not that bad with ETF's - better than most regular mutual funds and with 2X and 3X funds - you will be ahead of the market "average", either direction. So basically you are incorrect.
 

JHZR2

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 Originally Posted By: Pablo
Yes and no. Even at $8 trade it's not that bad with ETF's - better than most regular mutual funds and with 2X and 3X funds - you will be ahead of the market "average", either direction. So basically you are incorrect.
SSO, for example has an expense ratio of 0.95%, IIRC. No vanguard index fund expense level, for sure, but not as bad as the typical fund, with what? 1.5% in fees?
 
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ON, Canada eh?
 Originally Posted By: SuperDave456
I'm 28. The most important thing is to start young. The time value of money is the greatest multiplier out there.
+1 \:\! I started at 18 (now 27) and my Advisor says that if I stopped now I would still retire extremely comfortable. I socked away every penny I didn't need and I'm still living at home. (about to move out next year) I always drove s-boxes until 3 years ago when I needed a more reliable vehicle for my job, which the mileage covers the car payment, maintenace/repairs. To me having money for tomorrow is more important that big-screen TV's and morning Lattes ;\) My advice: -Save every penny you can, while still enjoying a vacation or two along the way. -Get a good advisor that uses: Dollar cost averaging, regular portfolio re-balancing and will manage your tax burden and risk properly. -DO NOT INVEST WITH A BANK, go to a private institution that only does investments, taxes, insurance etc. -If they seem pushy then they are probably pushing you into products and investments that help their bottom line and not yours. -If your employer offers a match plan, take advantage of every penny you can.
 
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